When did you know it was time to move on?

  1. 0
    I am currently looking for a new job but I had an idea it was time to move on when I got a new manager. My awesome job has just become plain out awful and even though I have tried to make it work, I am just done. Finished. Over it.
    The last nail on the coffin was that a patient asked specifically for me and he didn't even bother to tell me. So when I went to see this patient today, he was very upset that I hadn't seen him and I know for a fact my new manager saw and spoke to me right after he saw this patient. Not only did I get chewed out by the patient but my manager saw this patient and didn't even bother to do all the paperwork to boot!
    I can't wait to say I quit!
    I know the nurses on here always have interesting stories to tell so I was wondering, when did you know you were done with a job?

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    For a little over a year, I almost never ate lunch. I rarely sat down, and often worked a little late to catch up. Even with all that, I didn't feel like I gave the patients the care I would liked them to have. These elderly, often frail people only got the bare minimum with the amount of work I was faced with every day.
    I decided that I didn't want to be as dependent on CNAs. A good one made a day possible, and excellent one made the care of patients so much better and the bad/absentee ones made me want to quit.
    I plotted my escape for months. Took time to look around, and when the time came, I left on good terms with my manager and coworkers.
  4. 0
    When I realized that my spirit was dead and that I didn't sleep at all before a day shift because of severe anxiety. When I started signing up for 99% nights so I could hide from leadership.

    Full story here: http://allnurses.com/success-stories...-t-700630.html
  5. 0
    And to add to that, I just read my article and I had managed to forget many of the things that led me to quit over the last 8 months. Being away from that place has been good for my soul.
  6. 1
    When I dreamed about the residents floating up and down my basement steps.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from RNperdiem
    For a little over a year, I almost never ate lunch. I rarely sat down, and often worked a little late to catch up. Even with all that, I didn't feel like I gave the patients the care I would liked them to have. These elderly, often frail people only got the bare minimum with the amount of work I was faced with every day.
    I decided that I didn't want to be as dependent on CNAs. A good one made a day possible, and excellent one made the care of patients so much better and the bad/absentee ones made me want to quit.
    I plotted my escape for months. Took time to look around, and when the time came, I left on good terms with my manager and coworkers.
    I can relate to this on sooo many levels. You took the words out of my mouth. Get out of my head... Lol! A CNA can make or break your day, and unfortunately we only have 2 good CNAs. The others are like little Houdinis. They disappear and then I get stuck doing everything. Quite honestly I don't mind the grunt work, but I also have 6 patients to manage. I'm putting out fires all day long, and I'm doing their job too. It's too much for one person.. So, I'm a RN, a CNA, a hotel concierge, and a fireman. I'm physically and mentally exhausted at the end of a 12 hour shift (that almost always turns into a 14 hour shift).
  8. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    And to add to that, I just read my article and I had managed to forget many of the things that led me to quit over the last 8 months. Being away from that place has been good for my soul.
    Good for you, honey!! Big hugs!!
  9. 0
    When I was asked to plan to work off the clock every day I worked. When I was called negligent for not finishing ALL of my charting two hours into the shift (how is that possible? Why document ahead and guess what is going to happen in the next 10 hours? I digress...).
  10. 0
    More evidence (as we needed it) that people don't leave "jobs" - they leave "managers"- particularly when that individual's behavior actually creates a barrier between the nurse and what s/he really wants to do... practice nursing.

    A skilled and committed first-line manager can create an environment in which it is a joy to come to work each day - and they are desperately needed. Unfortunately, they are increasingly rare as health care organizations become less and less supportive - including providing development that new managers desperately need.

    Good luck OP
  11. 0
    I work away from the bedside but I'm likely to be leaving in the near future.

    Part of the reason was when our reviews suddenly turned highly critical, with no one meeting the new standards, not even the most senior staff.

    Part of the reason is that people are leaving, sometimes with little notice, sometimes after only being there a month or two. Even one of our executives left.

    Part of the reason is that we've had two meetings in less than a month where the executives have assured us everything's fine (which had the opposite effect for me)

    Too many alarm bells for me.


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