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rockstar11

rockstar11

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  1. Such a long post for something that should be so much simpler. Treat your orientee as you want to be treated. They are your colleague, not your dinner, or infant. Granted, I'm a bit cynical after having two horrid preceptors. One just frustrated with the heavy workload plus a student. The other (and her 1 year post new grad RN coworkers) got a rise out of throwing me under the bus and watching me struggle. Watching - not guiding, not advising, not helping. Waste of the patient's/corporation's money. I've also had three great preceptors. One who set me loose, yet provided kind oversight and praise for critical thinking skills. Another for being a tremendous resource and didn't let me slip up during orientation. And the other for providing positive feedback balanced with constructive criticism. And for those of you who think or are in a situation where healthcare is a blood sucking, back stabbing world - it is not like that everywhere. Better places may be harder to find, but they are there!!
  2. rockstar11

    Hesi Exit Test

    darn. not sure how to edit posts. but yes I passed the first time. our program has an AMAZING 72% NCLEX pass rate. yah. it's gross. i just didn't think it was terrible.
  3. rockstar11

    Hesi Exit Test

    I passed it the first time with a 935. I didn't study at all, just a good night sleep, and a shot of anger turned into energy. honestly. had a meeting about almost failing a class before the meeting, and then this? ok so REAL advice? you need to THINK. not to memorize. If doing questions helps you, do them. if caving your head into a review book helps you, do it. ours was over 150 questions long and, obviously... quite the marathon. pace yourself. i zoned out quite a few times and gave myself permission to take a 5 minute break (in my chair of course!). so back to my first part - THINK. to me, it was like a chemistry exam (not the math)... but just that you need to think through so many levels. This is why, this is why because of this, this... etc. I don't really know how to explain it without giving specific questions. Obviously it doesn't cover ALL the material you learned in a nursing school, but more so how to think through problems. Did I tell you you have to THINK? .....
  4. rockstar11

    university of detroit mercy second degree program

    wow, 10 students from just the health assessment class? I think only one left during those 2 weeks, but it was for family reasons, he did pass the class. After the first semester, out of like 66 or something, we have lost about 5 I think. A couple were due to family reasons and the others were probably due to grades. You need to get a 75% in each class... So, I was really, really... extremely worried about going into the program, passing all of my classes except 1 and having to do the traditional program or quit. And being out of all that money! But, it turns out that I was fairly prepared to do the coursework and had a really strong background in science and health stuff. It's not like freshman year of college when 1/2 of the straight-A-students from high school show up and say "I don't know how to study or pass these exams!!" I think that we were all very prepared, as we have already completed a bachelor's degree and passed some challenging pre-reqs. I'm not saying that I wouldn't worry about passing. Because if your work ethic slips, you might be out of the program. But for the most part, you can pass the classes if you put effort into them. Any info about the program? The biggest thing that I was unprepared for was the disorganization from the faculty/school. I was shocked at how disorganized the program was. It never got better, but I hear that a lot of accelerated programs (and nursing schools) are like that. Now I just rest knowing that no one knows what's going on :) Study groups. Get in one with people who have the same work ethic as you do and that can work together well. Don't be the person that doesn't do any work and hopes that everyone sends you material and teaches you - that gets old, fast... and it won't work very well for the exams. Laptops. Not sure if you have one, but get one. Some people have the little netbooks, those are pretty cheap and fit well in your backpack. They give out like 150 powerpoint slides/day, most of us just quit printing and bring our laptops for notes and stuff. Any other questions, feel free to ask :)
  5. rockstar11

    university of detroit mercy second degree program

    I am in the SDO right now, graduating next May. Sorry to hear that the program is full for Jan 2011. Though they say that it is full (and I'm sure that they have admitted the 70 students), some of them may decide to not enter or delay their start till May 2011. I was one of those who was supposed to start in Jan (2010) and decided to start in May (2010), along with a few other people. Some other people in my cohort were called and asked if they wanted to start sooner... so, if you are flexible in terms of start dates, let them know that and cross your fingers. Oh - and make sure that you send in your deposit ($500) - they will not save your spot unless they get that. Other than that, if you have to start in the summer, it's not all bad. The weather is much nicer and the campus will be, pretty much, all to the nursing/health profession students :).
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