Nurse Educator without nursing experience.. (?) - page 2

by bsnwnab 8,005 Views | 41 Comments

If I finished my BSN, and went straight to doing an MSN Educator program without any clinical/work experience, once I finish my MSN Ed, would I ever be hired as a teacher in community colleges or other places that hire MSN Ed... Read More


  1. 7
    Every job posting for a teaching position in nursing I have seen has required at least two years of clinical experience, often more, and, with just the minimum specified in the posting, you would not be a v. attractive candidate when competing with candidates who have much more solid clinical experience.

    Also, students can quickly tell the difference (between instructors who actually know what they're talking about from real life experience and those who don't) and will have little respect for those who don't. I know that, when I was in school, I would have felt really insulted and cheated to have an instructor who was not at least clinically competent in her/his specialty area.
  2. 2
    Lack of experience does not automatically mean you cannot be hired in a teaching position, but it sure will limit your opportunities. As an Educator I will say that you do not know how to do everything a nurse does to teach theory and other topics, but it will be difficult for them to relate to you unless you have walked in their shoes.
    loriangel14 and NutmeggeRN like this.
  3. 0
    Did you get a license by any chance. That is not made clear by your letter. Perhaps you can find some tiype of administrative or consultant job in an institution that is big enough to need one. Perhaps you should go on and get to doctorate and then you could get a self employment postion as a nurse educator consultant. What were you thinking about when you planned your life this way. Did you have a goal in mind?





    Quote from bsnwnab
    If I finished my BSN, and went straight to doing an MSN Educator program without any clinical/work experience, once I finish my MSN Ed, would I ever be hired as a teacher in community colleges or other places that hire MSN Ed nurses? What kind of jobs can I get without ANY nursing experience? Jobs that require MSN Ed.....
  4. 3
    Why would you want to teach without experience? Would you want a teacher without experience? I can understand your desire to teach, but much of teaching is done by example and through shared experience, not just by handing out text books. If you want to be a good and respected teacher, regardless of whether or not you can get a job straight out of finishing your masters, then you should acquire experience.
    Last edit by emmyers on May 10, '12 : Reason: grammar
    loriangel14, RN In FL, and wooh like this.
  5. 3
    You need 'street cred' if you expect your students to respect you. Even if you are only lecturing.

    Put in a foley? Male? Female? Obese person? How about an elderly woman on her side in the bed?!! And what about a suprapubic?? Do you even know what I am talking about??? I've done all of these and would feel comfortable instructing on any of them. If you haven't realized that if you are right-handed you should be standing with your left shoulder toward the head of the bed then you shouldn't be teaching.

    Why would you even WANT to teach about something you have never done???
    loriangel14, RN In FL, and wooh like this.
  6. 4
    This is exactly what bugs me about MANY not all career change people, people that get that BSN, go thru accelerated programs, hop on over to MSN programs, with no intentions of "nursing", and wonder why they can't get jobs in what their intentions are in the first place. I am in no way saying this poster has done this, just sounds "suspect". If people dont want to be nurses, stay out of the profession. I may sound harsh, but I am keeping it real. Can you imagine an MSN with no clinical. Thats why many of our young nurses are being turned out the way they are today upon graduating, because of very weak clinical instructors, already.

    signed,

    Old skool RN
    loriangel14, emmyers, Andy Droid, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    Have you thought about working in the field and becoming a preceptor first? Then pursuing your Masters for nursing education? I think that would be a much better route to take and you'd be infinitely more qualified to teach at the college level than just having "book" education.

    I'm seriously considering pursuing nursing education, but I know that's years down the road after I get my BSN and get some experience under my belt. I'm switching careers at 42 and I currently teach training classes at the company I work for. I *love* to teach! But I also know that you aren't as effective as an instructor unless you've "been there, done that". I work with 2 other trainers who have never been in the field that we teach and their new hires always struggle on the job. Since I've done the job before I moved into a training role, I'm able to better prep them for the real world because I know what it's like and what's expected of you in the role. I feel this would be especially important for a nursing educator!

    Best of luck with your decision
    wooh likes this.
  8. 5
    Quote from RN In FL
    This is exactly what bugs me about MANY not all career change people, people that get that BSN, go thru accelerated programs, hop on over to MSN programs, with no intentions of "nursing", and wonder why they can't get jobs in what their intentions are in the first place. I am in no way saying this poster has done this, just sounds "suspect". If people dont want to be nurses, stay out of the profession. I may sound harsh, but I am keeping it real. Can you imagine an MSN with no clinical. Thats why many of our young nurses are being turned out the way they are today upon graduating, because of very weak clinical instructors, already.

    signed,

    Old skool RN
    Can you imagine the awesomeness of the roads if someomne who has never driven a car in their life was given the drivers handbook to read, then told to teach kids to drive?
    loriangel14, wooh, Purple_Scrubs, and 2 others like this.
  9. 3
    oh since I am on my soap box about this. I don't understand, how people that have never been in the nursing profession can all off a sudden desire to "want to teach nurses", anyway. I mean many have not even been accepted into a nursing program. I understand these are long term goals, but being on the "inside" looking out, after 29 yrs, i am just shaking my head. The way these people speak of this profession and school, to me, they view it as some sort of cake walk, as you just "breeze in and out", and I take offense to that. Yes, I am taking it personal.


    signed,


    Old skool RN
    loriangel14, HouTx, and NutmeggeRN like this.
  10. 2
    I'd really recommend getting some floor experience first. Teaching is not something I've ever really wanted to do myself and it's possible you could still be a good teacher even without any experience but I promise you, you will not be taken seriously by your fellow staff as well as your students. I had an instructor who has her MSN but has very little floor experience, she's a competent instructor, but her lack of actual nursing experience shows in a lot of ways that are for the most part pretty negative.

    I also don't really feel comfortable with someone training students who will most likely start by working on floors, who has never worked on a floor themself. It's not quite as unnerving as Nurse practioners who have basically done 0 patient care and haven't even started their nursing careers, but you do not want to be a nursing instructor with no nursing experience. But whatever you decide good luck!
    loriangel14 and wooh like this.


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