I am Afraid. Please Pray for Me. - page 3

Many of us view the healthcare setting as a place of employment where we we are comfortable. To patients, however, this medical setting is a maze with frightening and uncertain twists and turns, ups... Read More

  1. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN} profile page
    1
    Very Much Enjoyed the Link, tnbutterfly, and printed it for my Scrapbook. Thanks for taking the time to be such a wonderful host to this thread, I won't forget it- or it's important message.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  tnbutterfly} profile page
    0
    I'm glad you liked the other article, Boston. Thank you for all of your kind comments in this thread.
  4. Visit  jhanes} profile page
    1
    I do not spout Bible verses or push my beliefs on others and would pray with a patient if they asked me to. I am not good at praying out loud off the cuff and have found that a general plea to the Almighty for support and help for the patient and the family in the situation consistent with God's plan suffices and covers almost all bases and most religions. I sometimes offer to pray for someone off the clock when they have some generic faith or ask if I believe but are not looking for a prayer. That kind of question can lead down Kubler-Ross Road, a real problem if you work on a busy "unit". I am greatful that in Home Care we have time to spend with individual patients and I remain alert for patients dealing with grief, death & dying issues, use therapeutic communication & make referrals where I can. I might add that I sure appreciated a prayer request from my surgeon prior to my CABG.
    I do not feel comfortable praying with a Wiccan or a Satan worshipper unless they wanted to ask for forgiveness from God but I would pray FOR them off the clock and include a fervent hope that they come to their senses. I would not express any judgement of them or their beliefs as that would be too much like an Atheist Nurse telling a patient "get over it." Praying to their "higher-power" seems like participating in devil worship. Can't do it. Maybe I'd call the Hospital Chaplain service instead. They are pros; let them figure it out...
    neverbethesame likes this.
  5. Visit  Mas Catoer} profile page
    0
    Great article. Helping me gainning more insight. Many nurses in my section have been in little conflict when in rush hours any patient or family ask for prayer companion. Not easily saying yes or even no.
  6. Visit  Ntheboat2} profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Great article about a touchy subject. Thank you for pointing out that a nurse should ONLY bring up religion/prayers if the pt initiates it. I've seen nurses without any provocation just start praying or saying things like "Jesus will save you". Unless the pt directs the conversation down that line, you should keep all that noise bottled up. Many sick people would simply be terrified by a nurse bringing up Jesus and the eternal soul and all that.

    On the other hand, I've seen scared, dying pts ask a nurse if they believe in God and the nurserespond "I'm an atheist." How is that supposed to help? A little white lie in this situation isn't going to hurt anyone. What we (nurses) believe isn't really the point. It's about the patient, not us.
    I'm a "non believer" and I've had the rare patient who seemed to just be dying to know about my religion. If someone says, "pray for me" or something like that then I just reply with, "I will." Like you said, a white lie never hurt anyone. However, it can get awkward when they flat out want to know your religion.
  7. Visit  somenurse} profile page
    3
    I am an atheist.
    I have not read the 4 pages of comments prior to posting this comment of my own. I have not even read the immediate comments above my comment, to know if i am inserting my comment into some hotbed of discussion, sorry, no idea, just posting after reading the OP remark.

    Having worked critical care areas, and hospice, where patients often turn to prayer, i have often been asked to pray with, or for, a patient. If a patient asks me, (an atheist, but not "out" at my WORK place) to pray with them, i will hug them (if we have that level of bond) while they pray. I am silent.
    I can hold their hands while they pray. I am silent, but, supportive of their wish to self-comfort in this manner. I myself, always find a polite way to get out of prayer circles around the bed, ("oh, i have to go check on someone." or something)
    but, if the patient is all alone, and asking me to pray with him/her, i will hold their hands while they pray, but, i am silent. I often offer to summon a chaplain, too.

    Sometimes, when i'd go to say goodbye to my patients, at the end of each shift, one or another might say to me, "Pray for me tonight?" and i almost always reply, often with a hug, "Oh, you WILL be so on my mind tonight. I will burn a candle for you tonight, and will be thinking of you tonight, and hoping so much, that you are comfortable tonight."

    stuff like that. In many decades, not one patient has ever seemed to realize, i didn't quite agree to pray for the patient.

    (RE: the candle, i love rituals, even though i'm atheist, i do love rituals.
    and i do own a special candle holder, which i light whenever someone i know is in trouble. Has nothing to do with gods or magic or spirits, nope. It's just a ritual, and alerts my family that someone is in trouble, keeps that person's needs forefront in our thoughts as we pass by that candle, and sometimes, having the person brought to mind so many times by my candle, i think up practical things i CAN do to help, like go over and walk their dog, or bring over a pot of soup, or shovel their sidewalk, or something therapeutic i can say to them when i see them next, etc)

    i really do light the candle, anyway.
    Last edit by somenurse on Nov 30, '12
    BusyBee91, blodeuwedd, and tnbutterfly like this.
  8. Visit  MN-Nurse} profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    On the other hand, I've seen scared, dying pts ask a nurse if they believe in God and the nurserespond "I'm an atheist." How is that supposed to help? A little white lie in this situation isn't going to hurt anyone. What we (nurses) believe isn't really the point. It's about the patient, not us.
    And if the scared, dying patient is an atheist? Which white lie do you tell?
  9. Visit  somenurse} profile page
    1
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    And if the scared, dying patient is an atheist? Which white lie do you tell?

    I am an atheist, and reply #2 is how i learned to handle that oft-asked question in critical care areas, "Nurse, do you believe in god?"
    http://allnurses.com/nursing-and-spi...ve-799254.html


    I float, and when you work in non-critical care areas, the "Nurse, do you believe in god?" thing does not come up nearly so often,
    as it does when the patient is facing death.


    Guess everyone has to find their own way to respond, but, reply#2 there, is how i learned to answer that question.



    Turns out, the patient doesn't reeeeally care if YOU believe in god, it's really a springboard for the patient to discuss THEIR belief in god, or, lack thereof, or whatever is on the patient's mind. That moment is not really about YOU, it's about the patient, imo. He just wants to talk out whatever god-thoughts are on HIS mind, and wants someone to listen while he does, and probably wants support, too. I usually end such conversations with an offer to summon the chaplain, too.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  10. Visit  tnbutterfly} profile page
    1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514

    That moment is not really about YOU, it's about the patient, imo. He just wants to talk out whatever god-thoughts are on HIS mind, and wants someone to listen while he does, and probably wants support, too. I usually end such conversations with an offer to summon the chaplain, too.

    Exactly!!! It is about the patient and his/her spiritual needs. You do what you can to meet those needs.

    In a like manner, when your patient has a physical pain, you do not stand there and talk about your headache. You do what you can to ease his/her pain.
    somenurse likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top