Dear nursing student - page 4

Dear clinical student, I am your soon-to-be instructor. Know that I love this profession and have dedicated my life to it and to my patients. I consider this profession to be a calling. I did not... Read More

  1. Visit  A New Start profile page
    2
    Never run from a bully wearing panties! Or any other for that matter. It makes me sick watching how some of the young people are treated around me, but I can't stand and fight their fights. It wouldn't be helpful.

    Learning how to communicate with others in your profession is an essential skill for nursing. We train people how to talk to us. When an instructor or a Dr or a preceptor attempts to belittle you, stop what you are doing. (Unless you're working on a client) But at the very least get very quiet and make direct unblinking eye contact. In a calm unwaivering voice, ask them to tell you their concern in a calm quiet professional manner. Point out any aggressive non verbal communication (like finger punching) and tell them to stop it. Listen. Listen. Listen. Then restate what you think they want and repeat it back.

    There's more. Read up on passive, aggresive, and passive aggressive communication. Your confidence will grow and your adversaries will respect you.

    They eat you cause you taste good!

    A New Start
    NRSKarenRN and vegas2009 like this.
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  3. Visit  vegas2009 profile page
    0
    Quote from mspontiac
    But I digress - my point is, respect goes both ways. Instructors can be wonderful mentors, provided they view us all as individuals and not as nameless rabble who have no idea what we are doing academically.

    I agree completely. The problem is, instructors like that usually don't get in trouble. Nursing schools see these instructors as just, training their students for the 'evils of real world nursing.' I can see the reasoning from it. But, it doesn't mean I like it. This is why growing a thick skin makes sense.

    But inspite of the negativity, there are always instructors that are above their counterparts. They are the ones who don't 'follow' the 'norm'. Those are the ones I'm thankful for.
    Last edit by vegas2009 on Apr 23, '10
  4. Visit  vegas2009 profile page
    0
    [quote=A New Start;4202422] There's more. Read up on passive, aggresive, and passive aggressive communication. Your confidence will grow and your adversaries will respect you.
    They eat you cause you taste good!


    Yup, no kidding .
    Last edit by vegas2009 on Apr 23, '10
  5. Visit  annacnatorn profile page
    0
    As a pre Nursing student, I take what you have written to heart and have put it in a safe place. I have been in Hospice for 6 years and love every minute of it. My good friend, also my mentor, an RN is constantly pushing me beyond my "job duties" preparing me for the next step. She is equipping me via challenges, she makes my brain work and sometimes hurt! 8 hours, got it. I have been fortunate enough to have been taught how to do ncp!
  6. Visit  suzi-Q profile page
    0
    This is hands down the best posting I have ever had the pleasure of reading on this sight. It is concise and factual but leads with heart, which is what a good nurse does. Well written too. Love, love, love it. I got a little choked up....
    I hope that it will serve as a kind of refresher to more seasoned nurses also.
    Thank you!
  7. Visit  makingitright profile page
    0
    I can tell that you are a very caring and loving individual. I would love to learn from someone like you. I pray and wish that all nursing students would so blessed to have you as an instructor. Keep doing you.
  8. Visit  msu2011 profile page
    2
    Sounds nice.... personally I have never in my life met a group of people
    (RN Instructor's) that want to smash a student's hopes and dreams. Alot of these instructor's act like students are in the military. I do not understand this mentality. I remember in LPN school alot of these Rn's had "picks" or "clicks"...I never was one for a pick or click.There was that one student these RN's would pick on and try to get kicked out of the program. I am in my last two semester's of receiving my BSN degree, and have seen alot and suffered alot from these pitt-bulls aka angels in white... pffffft!. These attitudes I have seen has almost turned me against nursing. You know, I do not care how many degrees one has behind one's name, who all you know, where you work, etc...it's all about how you treat people!
    annacnatorn and RPN_2012 like this.
  9. Visit  RPN_2012 profile page
    0
    Quote from msu2011
    There was that one student these RN's would pick on and try to get kicked out of the program.
    OMG, seriously? That's just plain evil!

    Quote from msu2011
    it's all about how you treat people!
    I agree!
  10. Visit  sarabear44 profile page
    0
    I hope all clinical instructors are as passionate as you are (and not just doing it for the extra money). I am starting an ABSN this summer.
  11. Visit  vegas2009 profile page
    0
    [quote=msu2011;4212952] Sounds nice.... personally I have never in my life met a group of people (RN Instructor's) that want to smash a student's hopes and dreams. Alot of these instructor's act like students are in the military. I do not understand this mentality.


    It's not really smashing students' hopes and dreams, it's called 'weeding people out'. It's just the way it is, they do it, because they CAN. It's not necessarily the faculty who 'kills the dreams of students,' the nursing program is already set up that way. The exaggerated 'nursing hype' for years has enabled them to do it. As long as there are plenty of nurse wannabes, nursing schools will continue to do it --- AND nursing students will continue to put up with it. It's like an 'initiation' process I guess. In their eyes, it's like a 'passage to be a nurse?' I don't know, since I've never been faculty. But, in a way, they do it because it produces good results. I understand the reasoning behind what nursing schools do. But, it doesn't mean I like it.

    Oh yea, since you mentioned the military.... people only go through 'basic training' for a FEW months, in nursing schools-- it's two years of pure h*ll! Funny huh? Initiation process is a b**ch And oh, here's the kicker: If you survive all that nursing school stuff, you MAY OR MAY NOT land a job. Even if you do land a job, it most likely won't cover all your bills and the worst part is --- you've just added another $$ loan under your name. I guess one has to like torture to go to nursing school, you might say.

    It's true, nursing is a diversified field and I personally like it. It's got the stress just like any other job but I don't know if it's a smart choice anymore.
    Last edit by vegas2009 on Apr 23, '10
  12. Visit  Ace0003 profile page
    0
    Tattoos don't make you look "dirty" or unprofessional. Your mannerisms and intelligence in your field radiate professionalism. 90% of the population has a tattoo. If you are going to tell me with all my knowledge and experience in nursing, that I don't qualify as a respectable, professional representation for the field because of my tattoos, I fear the welfare of our clients are in grave danger. Let's not think skin deep.
  13. Visit  Sharanjit profile page
    0
    Thanks for sharing instructor-to-be as new nursing student-to-be(Fall 2010) I want to be prepared for school. If you have any suggestions like any books to read in summer. Please share with us. Thanks
  14. Visit  tokebi profile page
    0
    It was very nice to read such heart-felt writing from an instructor's perspective. I only have one gripe about it though -- care plans, but my complaint is not about how much time is deemed sufficient to spend on them.

    Care plans were very much emphasized when I went through school to become LVN. But never did I see them serving much purpose as I worked in acute care and long term care facilities. There's this little tab labeled "care plan" in the charts, never getting attention from anyone except by medical records and whoever's auditing the chart and harping on us if incomplete. In other words, they do not have much practical function other than being more paperwork for the sake of paperwork. Whether in a hospital or a nursing home, nurses working in today's condition of health care field simply do not have the time to sit and produce a writing composition. Please teach us relevant skills. Help us be efficient nurses and prepare us for the reality of nursing these days, not the outdated or irrelevant nursing models.

    Now, if the purpose of writing care plans is specifically to train us in critical thinking, then please forgive my impudence. However, if we're expected to believe that the plans themselves are actually important in our work, other than being yet another useless paperwork to be completed, I can't help but roll my eyes. I am extremely excited to start RN program this fall, but I dread for the vestigial parts of nursing education that will not see the light of day once we go out in real world.

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