The nurses every co-worker hates - page 3

by RNGriffin 8,328 Views | 59 Comments

I don't know exactly how the context of this message will be articulated, but I am interested in gaining knowledge on the topic & opinions. So, I am a seasoned nurse, not that it should make any difference in the haul of this... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from griffinchet
    I am going to try the conversing: Hello, Goodmorning, Good evening( a little more frequent than I am at this present moment). I truly couldn't build up the interest to be interested in my co-workers kids, husbands, or lives outside of work. I know that may be relatable to some. But, I find that opens up doors for personal questions of myself or even continuous pictures of children I could care less about. I try to mean that in the best way possible. But, if I become involved with everyone's private lives it definitely spills over into mine.
    I've worked with lots of people who are very sociable, but literally never say one word about their private lives. In every case people seem to pick up on that and don't pry.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Sep 27, '12
    dudette10 likes this.
  2. 1
    Have you ever read the book, "How to Win Friends and Influence People"?
    It's a great basic book about human relations and how to get what you want and need by garnering the cooperation of others. It's very likely available at your local library or bookstore.
    whichone'spink likes this.
  3. 4
    Start by learning how not to allow your coworkers lives to spill over into yours. There's no reason that seeing pictures of your coworkers's new baby should cause your life to change. Small talk and basic human interactions are the grease that makes team formation possible. As a coworker, I can't trust someone who holds themselves apart from the team. Even more so, I can't trust a director/supervisor that interested in building a strong team.

    Being able to interact with your coworkers and talk to them about non-work topics doesn't mean that they all need to become your new best friend or that you need to divulge your entire private life. There's a balance to be struck between being aloof and cold and over sharing. I'm not sure where to start, other than practicing showing an interest in your fellow nurses as people. If you don't care about them, it's going to be obvious,so maybe you can learn to care, at least a little bit.

    The cure for CBFS is a smile. Simple as that. Again, not that you have to be fake, but is it really that difficult to smile at someone and say hi?
    chevyv, RNGriffin, monkeybug, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    You have to give a little social chit chat while not allowing them to draw you into a biatch fest. Sympathize while at the same timing ending the discussion.
  5. 1
    Quote from Aurora77
    The cure for CBFS is a smile. Simple as that. Again, not that you have to be fake, but is it really that difficult to smile at someone and say hi?
    It isn't really that simple. Of course I smile when I greet someone or have any other human interaction. But when they walk by my office and see me on the computer I often heard "what has you so p***ed" when in actuality I was just concentrating. Or passing someone when a greeting isn't necessary (already done and a person I pass 1000 times a day in the clinic hall) I may not be all smiley and my CBF rears its ugly head. So, no, a smile isn't always a cure unless you can carry off smiling all day long which if you've ever been a bride you know actually gets painful.
    anotherone likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from FlyingScot

    It isn't really that simple. Of course I smile when I greet someone or have any other human interaction. But when they walk by my office and see me on the computer I often heard "what has you so p***ed" when in actuality I was just concentrating. Or passing someone when a greeting isn't necessary (already done and a person I pass 1000 times a day in the clinic hall) I may not be all smiley and my CBF rears its ugly head. So, no, a smile isn't always a cure unless you can carry off smiling all day long which if you've ever been a bride you know actually gets painful.
    Why can't you make eye contact and smile when adding someone in the halls? I'm truly baffled. Maybe I'm odd, but it comes easily to me and I can't imagine why it would be painful, unless it's fake. A little friendliness just makes life easier and nursing is challenging enough.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  7. 0
    You seem to look at things in a very black and white way. Either blunt and straightforward, or a doormat. That's not the way dealing with people works. There are people who can be very straightforward and no-nonsense while still having tact and courtesy for others' feelings. There is a middle ground, I promise. I think finding that middle ground will help you relate better with your coworkers.
  8. 0
    A quick glance at your post and I am already offended by it. Maybe that's your problem? If you don't care that you offend people by what you say, own it and accept that people just won't like you.
  9. 1
    Quote from Aurora77
    Why can't you make eye contact and smile when adding someone in the halls? I'm truly baffled. Maybe I'm odd, but it comes easily to me and I can't imagine why it would be painful, unless it's fake. A little friendliness just makes life easier and nursing is challenging enough.
    Did you even read my post? I work in a small office with 8 nurses. I cheerfully greet them every morning when I come in. I chat with them. I smile at them when they are interacting with me but I also pass them a million times in one 10 hour shift and it would be ridiculous to worry about making eye contact with them. Nobody on our staff finds it necessary to acknowledge someone every single time we see them and we all get along famously. The "smiling all day" I was referring to was having one plastered on at all times no matter who is looking on the off chance that somebody might see me and interpret my mood based on my facial expression (like when I'm working on the computer). I have furrows between my eyebrows. When my face is relaxed it looks like I'm frowning when I'm not. I cannot help this and I won't get Botox. The only counter to this is a permanent smile plastered on my face which would indeed be fake. People, who don't know me, have a habit of interpreting it as my being angry even though I'm not interacting with them and may be innocently sitting alone in my office working on paperwork with the door open. Your assumption that I am unfriendly is way off base although I'll admit I'm a little irritated right now so I'm probably verging on being snippy and I am not currently smiling so my CBF is definitely showing.
    anotherone likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from getmethisnownurse
    A quick glance at your post and I am already offended by it. Maybe that's your problem? If you don't care that you offend people by what you say, own it and accept that people just won't like you.
    My response to this is, the extent some people will go to be offended. If you are offended by something as simple as me being me, I can't help you. That's ownership to my **********, I guess.
    anotherone likes this.


Top