No need to be upset at the truth! Change careers - page 4

by RNGriffin

12,728 Views | 148 Comments

One thing that has baffled me on this website is individuals always are up in arms when the truth is, if you have no passion for the profession you need to make life decisions for yourself. Most individuals come on allnurses.com... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from applewhitern
    I see the ones who see nursing as a passion (thru rose-colored glasses) aren't even nurses in the real world yet.
    Well, maybe not nursing but medicine in general. If you brought your dog to my icu, i would deliver the same standard of care expected of an rn in a sicu or micu. No rose colored glasses here, you are absolutely correct, won't know until i am caring for the human-y types on the floor. But i would hope the red tape, the politics, the "for profit" mentality won't kill my fundamental love for medicine, or the drive to educate myself.
    I think ill keep my RVT licensure as well as RN (assuming i make it!) just in case
    MA_Davis likes this.
  2. 8
    To the OP - If you were talking about people you work with on the job, you'd have a point. You do have a choice about what threads you read, and it's quite a leap to assume that what you perceive about a person via an online message board reflects who they are in the real world.
    OCNRN63, Rose_Queen, nuangel1, and 5 others like this.
  3. 13
    Quote from MA_Davis
    I hope to be a great Nurse one day as well..I have it in me..drive ...But I am a MA and my teacher who taught me was a RN,and NP. She also has cancer and still works..teaches classes....and doesn't complain nearly as much as I have heard of some people on here and she's on Double Chemo...she also was a Flight Nurse...this woman is my idol and a perfect example of a nurse who loved what she does...for 40 years.
    There are people here who love to complain about their jobs who are on chemo, too. If you don't like what you read, the answer is not to stifle other people from expressing themselves. Don't read them. There are lots of positivity threads here for you.. . and a functional ignore button so you won't even need to see posts from people who offend you.
    anotherone, OCNRN63, Fiona59, and 10 others like this.
  4. 2
    Quote from sydzmommy
    Well, maybe not nursing but medicine in general. If you brought your dog to my icu, i would deliver the same standard of care expected of an rn in a sicu or micu. No rose colored glasses here, you are absolutely correct, won't know until i am caring for the human-y types on the floor. But i would hope the red tape, the politics, the "for profit" mentality won't kill my fundamental love for medicine, or the drive to educate myself. I think ill keep my RVT licensure as well as RN (assuming i make it!) just in case
    . I think working with animals is harder, I could never do it. You can't explain to them that you are trying to help, you can't ask them what happened or what is bothering them, and you really have to gain their trust while trying to draw blood and such. I also know I could not handle the heartbreak. My hats off to you.
    Last edit by beeker on Jun 13, '12 : Reason: iPad autocorrect has gone mad
    Fiona59 and sydzmommy like this.
  5. 9
    There is a lot of abuse in nursing. Some people must publicly crucify themselves and tell people that they actually believe they are worthy over others of being crucified, eg. Abuse begets abuse. Psychologically they are also unable to parse this abuse as it happens to them, so one way of dealing is to say that it's not abuse and that they are not victims of anything of the kind, and are actually of a higher conscience than other members of the profession in that they are able to consciously continue and actually invite abuse because it's a requirement of the job - it's in the manual, and they know they can deliver.

    It's called GASLIGHTING oneself, actually.
    anotherone, Everline, Sisyphus, and 6 others like this.
  6. 11
    As long as a nurse is competent at their job, why on earth would anyone care if they are in it because of a "calling" or because they just want a decent job.

    I am not ashamed to admit I became a nurse because I live in Michigan, and a well paying job with security is hard to come by.

    I've seen plenty of 2nd career former factory or construction workers who are way WAY more competent than some of the "Florence Nightengale Syndrome" nurses out there.
    anotherone, klone, OCNRN63, and 8 others like this.
  7. 11
    Wow, this thread is interesting(with
    the varied views from actual nurses to prospective nurses)!

    my opinion: you do have to be passionate about nursing to get into it. otherwise you will be miserable at your job which will affect the quality of care you give to your patients(yes, I realize this is an assumption).

    HOWEVER, it is just a job and people need to realize that. to claim you're fully passionate and will continue to thrive on passion alone as a nurse is very naive. (my opinion) you need to look at it as "a job" and leave your work behind at the end of your shift or else you will get burned out very fast.

    I don't mean to sound rude with this:
    but it seems as if the "future nurses" on this thread are a little judgmental and unrealistic. Pre nursing, nursing school and actual nursing are very different worlds!!
    anotherone, nursel56, OCNRN63, and 8 others like this.
  8. 12
    I so agree. I saw this thread and was like huh? So if you have a problem with being worked half to death and being treated like poo then there is something wrong with you? This is why I say leave the floor nursing to those who like the abuse. Things will never change for the better because co-workers like the OP are fine with being treated like crap.

    Quote from netglow
    There is a lot of abuse in nursing. Some people must publicly crucify themselves and tell people that they actually believe they are worthy over others of being crucified, eg. Abuse begets abuse. Psychologically they are also unable to parse this abuse as it happens to them, so one way of dealing is to say that it's not abuse and that they are not victims of anything of the kind, and are actually of a higher conscience than other members of the profession in that they are able to consciously continue and actually invite abuse because it's a requirement of the job - it's in the manual, and they know they can deliver.

    It's called GASLIGHTING oneself, actually.
    nursel56, OCNRN63, Fiona59, and 9 others like this.
  9. 10
    Also called martyr syndrome.....
    Quote from Lovely_RN
    I so agree. I saw this thread and was like huh? So if you have a problem with being worked half to death and being treated like poo then there is something wrong with you? This is why I say leave the floor nursing to those who like the abuse. Things will never change for the better because co-workers like the OP are fine with being treated like crap.
    anotherone, Lovely_RN, nursel56, and 7 others like this.
  10. 8
    Many people who work a job they don't like ARE making life decisions. They're deciding they can't quit for some reason or another. Maybe they hope to move up or away from bedside some day. Maybe they can't afford to go back to school. Maybe they'd rather have the relative job security in this climate than go forge their way into the world. Maybe they just stick with what they know. Maybe they are still hoping for change.

    (Ir)regardless, it's no ones responsibility to leave their job so they can allegedly make your job more enjoyable - maybe turn it into some idealistic bubble where everyone sings kumbaya before a shift and wears "We Love Our Job" tshirts under their scrubs. This is real life. And it's each individual person's real life. Blanket, unquantifiable traits such as "passion" sound REALLY great, and I'm glad you feel you have it, but it doesn't give you some extraordinary rights to a job. Those who REALLY hate it will probably leave soon after they start. No worries.
    Last edit by Stephalump on Jun 13, '12
    ShaedRN, nursel56, Rose_Queen, and 5 others like this.


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