Nurses in trouble get second chances - Minnesota - page 2

Minnesota State regulators say they protect the public with a closer watch on caregivers accused of misconduct. Those who lost loved ones want them to do more. Elda Bothun lay unconscious on her... Read More

  1. Visit  SDALPN profile page
    4
    I agree that there needs to be a limit to extra chances. If a mistake is made more than once and the nurse doesn't learn their lesson the first time...its not a mistake. But if the nurse makes a med error that harms a pt and then 10 years later has a drink too many and has been reported for both, shouldn't lose his/her license over that. I don't think that makes the nurse incompetent or dangerous. Again, it should be a case by case basis.

    I don't think a restricted license does any good unless the nurse has a drug problem and they are restricted for that. I have seen too many job ads say that nurses must have an unrestricted license. How does a nurse find a job that way? I think there are better ways to handle the discipline. Taking food out of someones mouth or their childs (by taking away their ability to work) because of a simple mistake is too harsh.
  2. Visit  ArtClassRN profile page
    0
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    Those nurses were foreign, blast me all you please, that made a difference
    Not all the nurses in the article were foreign.
  3. Visit  krisiepoo profile page
    1
    at what point, however, does the obligation turn to the facility? I've never been hired in a caregiving position (case management, mental health counseling, group homes, nursing SCHOOL) where I haven't had to do a background check. Granted, it won't catch some of this but for felonies and such?
    spurs21550 likes this.
  4. Visit  SDALPN profile page
    1
    Quote from krisiepoo
    at what point, however, does the obligation turn to the facility? I've never been hired in a caregiving position (case management, mental health counseling, group homes, nursing SCHOOL) where I haven't had to do a background check. Granted, it won't catch some of this but for felonies and such?


    The people who have a clean record always have the potential to be convicted of a crime. The people with convictions have more to lose if they make another mistake. I don't think the facility can control a nurses actions 100%. I would fault the facility for overstaffing, putting nurses on the floor that haven't had proper training, etc. We have the right to refuse an assignment. But these facilities can be dishonest about the situation before we accept the assignment. We also know that if we refuse an unsafe assignment that we can be fired for it. So it puts nurses under pressure to make poor choices to keep food on their table. So with that, I think the facilities could be just as much at fault.
    tori51874 likes this.
  5. Visit  LL143KnB profile page
    2
    For real? My name is foreign but I can assure you that I was born and raised in the US not that it matters. So we're basing nurses competence based on names now? Gotcha
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    Those nurses were foreign, blast me all you please, that made a difference
    hecallsmeDuchess and tori51874 like this.
  6. Visit  ArtClassRN profile page
    0
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    My first job in healthcare was in one of those and it was horrible.
    And when I say "One of those" I mean specifically one of the facilities mentioned in the article.
  7. Visit  pixie6089 profile page
    4
    Those nurses were foreign, blast me all you please, that made a difference
    Racism has no place in nursing. Not every foreign nurse is incompetent and not every incompetent nurse is foreign. Grow up!
  8. Visit  marymohn profile page
    7
    As a Minnesota nurse, I found this article very disturbing. Certainly people can and do change and can re-establish themselves as competent caregivers after making mistakes and very bad decisions. A few observations on the articles. There was no one gender, race, or level of nurse portrayed in the article. There were men and woman, various ethnicities, and both LPNs and RNs. There were also nurses from acute care facilities and long term care facilities. So this isn't about any of that. It is about people doing very bad and sometimes illegal things while practicing nursing. I don't think the punishments were severe enough in some cases and at least by what was presented in the article, some of these individuals should have been criminally prosecuted.

    What bothers me the most is the way those of us that are practicing correctly, respectfully, legally, and ethically are included in a group of all nurses in Minnesota.
    mcmgal, noc4senuf, pixie6089, and 4 others like this.
  9. Visit  nursesue07 profile page
    0
    I have been a LVN for 12 years and when I read this I was shocked all I can say is that those nurses SHOULD have had their license TAKEN away, there is no excuse that I can see, I have worked in long term facilities and psych hospitals. When you have an emergency like that you try everything you can to keep them alive and not just walk away. Have your license is a privilege. I have meet to many nurses in my 13 years that don't care and that makes me sick. I became a nurse to help and take care of people.
  10. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    2
    This is a very charged subject. However lets be mindful of what we are posting. While wen courage lively debate we do not allow rudeness or name calling. Thanks...
    sapphire18 and Esme12 like this.
  11. Visit  singingtothewheat profile page
    7
    I read the whole article too. I also watched the video. What disturbs me about this story is that people seem to think that their loved ones are going to live forever. It's not really very clear weather the nurses left the room to do something, like call the family, while paramedics worked on her, or they left knowing she needed assistance from THEM.

    Come on. We aren't miracle workers. We can not make people rise from the dead. This precious lady wasn't 20 and healthy, she was OLD and she'd lived a great life from the way it sounds. If she wasn't going to die from a heart attack at her advanced age, exactly what would have been considered a death worth dying?

    I don't mean to be cold or callous in any way but...... come on. Babies are born, the old die. That's the natural progression of life. That is what is natural. What would not be "natural", is breaking this woman ribs away from her sternum, breaking her fragile bones, stabbing her with needles, inserting tubes, putting her on a ventilator, so she could rise only to be a shell of her former self... if she rose at all. All of that pain to prevent what is intended.

    This seems like a terribly sad and ridiculous way to remember this lady
    PTKChic, kungpoopanda, Bortaz, RN, and 4 others like this.
  12. Visit  spurs21550 profile page
    3
    I agree with you its sad about loved ones thinking loved ones will live forever, and it is not natural to break ribs, insert needles and tubes, and we are not miracle workers. We also cannot make the decision on who should live or die by withholding treatment based on if we feel the person has has a fulfilling life, and we don't want to cause them any more pain . What you are saying makes perfect sense to me, as nurses we see these situations every day, but without a DNR order, the nurses should have started resuciatation
    rlev, sapphire18, and RNInterupted like this.
  13. Visit  casi profile page
    0
    I wasn't expecting to see a nurse I work with named in that article... Wow.

    I honestly didn't know that Minnesota had such lax laws.


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