Being an individual

  1. Hi, I'm still in nursing school, but wanted to know if there was any way to be an individual in the workplace. I'm talking pure fashion here. Is there anything you can wear, shoes, laces, variations in scrubs, pins on scrubs, sock choices, etc etc etc. Anything someone can do to set themselves apart in a sea of everyone wearing the same gear?
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  2. 77 Comments

  3. by   mmc51264
    Most days I forget what I am wearing let alone trying to make a fashion statement. LOL. I am lucky my socks match. Your ability to be the best nurse you can is the best way to show your individuality.
  4. by   Red Kryptonite
    A friend and I started our CNA careers together in a hospital where everyone was color coded. RNs wore navy, CNAs wore ceil blue, etc. She has short hair and wore big, fancy hair bands with flowers and butterflies on them.
  5. by   elkpark
    I don't really understand the whole "I want to express myself at work" thing. I'm at work to work, and, beyond looking neat and professional, nobody cares what I'm wearing or what I look like. I express my personality and fashion sense outside of work.

    Plus, if you're working in a bedside, direct care position, anything personal and special you wear to work is likely to end with Gawd-knows-what, insert-bodily-fluid-of-your-choice-here on it. One of the best tips I got in nursing school was don't wear anything to work that is important to you, and that you wouldn't be fine with having ruined.
  6. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from Circulate
    Hi, I'm still in nursing school, but wanted to know if there was any way to be an individual in the workplace. I'm talking pure fashion here. Is there anything you can wear, shoes, laces, variations in scrubs, pins on scrubs, sock choices, etc etc etc. Anything someone can do to set themselves apart in a sea of everyone wearing the same gear?
    The facility you eventually become employed by will dictate the Big Picture. As long as you don't violate the dress code (or Infection Control standards!) I guess you could figure it out from there.

    Honestly, though, it's not really a big concern to most anyone I've ever worked with. Some wear a different kind of badge clip. Or a fanny pack. Or colored t-shirts under scrubs. But for the most part....I gotta tell you....no one really cares. Frankly, MOST are happy to wear the free scrubs dispensed in the machines on the floors, that get laundered free and are available in sets. Most don't care who is wearing what!
  7. by   caroladybelle
    Dress code is strict at my facility.

    I will say that my coworkers have wide variety of Danskos. Starry skies, rainbow, different colors and finishes, etc.
  8. by   VivaLasViejas
    Work really isn't the place to display one's fashion sense. That being said, I had a drawerful of colorful and even whimsical scrunchies that I used to keep my hair up, and I changed them every day. They were often conversation starters.
  9. by   PixieRN14
    My facility does not have a uniform. As long as it is neat, clean and professional then you are good to go. Yet, being fashionable is the last thing on most people's mind when it is time to get ready to head into work. Most days I am lucky if I can find matching socks 😉
  10. by   roser13
    Quote from Circulate
    Hi, I'm still in nursing school, but wanted to know if there was any way to be an individual in the workplace. I'm talking pure fashion here. Is there anything you can wear, shoes, laces, variations in scrubs, pins on scrubs, sock choices, etc etc etc. Anything someone can do to set themselves apart in a sea of everyone wearing the same gear?
    LOL! I will stay tuned to see what your priority concerns are after (hopefully) graduation.
  11. by   Anna S, RN
    I accidentally wore two different shoes to work today- maybe you could try that?
    Seriously, the two shoes are similar in color, no one noticed.
  12. by   roser13
    Quote from Anna S, RN
    I accidentally wore two different shoes to work today- maybe you could try that?
    Seriously, the two shoes are similar in color, no one noticed.
    But if no one noticed, that would defeat the purpose of setting yourself apart!
  13. by   Anna S, RN
    Quote from roser13
    But if no one noticed, that would defeat the purpose of setting yourself apart!

    But I knew I wore two different shoes (at least I knew it half-way through my shift).
    I set myself apart in my mind, where it counts.
  14. by   BrandonLPN
    Nursing schools tend to be stricter with their dress codes than most employers actually are. Once you start working, you'll likely have more fashion options than you do now as a student.

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