Latest Comments by lovelylady42

lovelylady42 2,007 Views

Joined May 9, '08. Posts: 27 (0% Liked)

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    I am a senior in nursing school. I am building a resume to begin applying or internships. I just have a question about my reference list. I already have 2 former employers and would like to have 1 or 2 more references. I tutored a student in A&P and nutrition. Is it a good idea to put her down as a reference?

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    A client is receiving 2mg in 250mL D5W. The order is to infuse at 20mL/hr.
    Calculate:
    mg/hr
    mcg/hr
    mcg/min

    The answers I keep getting are:
    .16mg/hr
    160mcg/hr
    2.7mcg/min

    The book answers are:
    .36mg/hr
    360mcg/hr
    6mcg/min

    Who is wrong me or the book? lol

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    This is the topic for my PICO question:
    Advantages/Disadvantages of negative pressure wound therapy (or other types of therapy) or various treatments on wound healing

    This is what I have so far:
    In patients with pressure ulcers (p) what is the effect of pressure wound therapy (I) as compared with_______ (c) on wound healing (o)

    What would I put for the C? Do I just choose a random type of wound healing therapy to compare it to? I think I have to be more specific than just "various treatments"

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    These are the 2 classes I'm real worried about taking next semester . So if you have taken pharmacology or pathophysiology, what should I study from A&P that would help me?

    bones?
    muscles - muscle physiology?
    nervous system?
    endocrine?
    cardiac?
    immune?
    all of it?

    ...which should I study more, Anatomy or physiology?

    ANY help will be greatly appreciated

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    I have to take parmacology, and pathophysiology next semester so I'm reviewing my A&P, but muscle physiology is my LEAST favorite topic so, for those of you who have taken an RN pharm or patho course, is it really necessary that I study it?

    ... and what else do you recommend that I review? It's been 2 years since I took A&P, so I'm planning on studying hard but I'd rather study what I'm going to need to know for those classes.

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    I am a nursing student and I have to write a paper on my short and long term goals after graduation.
    I am looking into all fields and NICU really interests me.
    So NICU nurses:
    what do you like best about your job?
    What do you like least about your job?
    Would you rather be working in a different area?
    Do you think they hire new graduates?

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    Hi, just wondering. What did you not like about irving?

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    It doesnt matter what your major is.
    You can major in opera if you wanted to as long as you have all the courses necessary for med school.
    And of course, nursing would be alot more helpful than opera.
    The point is they dont care what your major is!
    easy, hard, art or biochem it doesnt matter! as long as you have those required courses for med school!

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    I am about to start nursing school next semester and Im a little worried.
    I've heard nurses have GREAT communication skills and just LOVE to be around people.
    ok so here is my story:
    I work at a retail store as a sales associate and I do NOT like my job, Im not very good at "small talk" i am NOT great at upselling or selling plans/warranties on our products.
    BUT
    I also work as a pca at a retirement home and i LOVE my job. I love helping people i love listening to the residents tell stories about when they were younger, i just love making a difference in their lives, i love knowing that i am needed to make their lives much easier.
    SO
    will I have alot of trouble as a nurse if my communication skills arent great?
    ...i want to work as an RN at a hostpital, i know i will have to comfort people during hard times, and i want to work on that i really do

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    Right now I work at an assisted living retirement home. Basically, I help residents with their ADL's.
    I am a CNA and, since it is an assisted living, I will be trained to give meds in January.
    I want to work in a hospital to work with RN's(since that is what i want to be) but I know CNA's are not allowed to handle any meds whatsoever in a hospital.
    I want to work somewhere that will help me do well in nursing school, I know how hard and stressful nursing school will be, and NOT working is not an option, so I might as well work somewhere that will help me learn right?

    ...so where do you think is best? assisted living facility or hospital?

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    im about to take pharmacology and pathophysiology and i just wanted to freshen up on my A&P before i take those classes. I was wondering if there is any one or 2 systems that are most important to know for success in these classes?

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    for the generic bsn program?

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    the question was why i chose that particular nursing program and what i perceive to be the most challenging about nursing school.
    any suggestions will help me greatly

    working as a certified nurse's assistant has given me first-hand knowledge about what it takes to be a nurse. not only have i observed nurses daily and know what the job entails, but i have also worked alongside them and supported them in their positions. i know in my heart that becoming an rn is what i want to do, the first and foremost reason would be the challenge. i think the human body is absolutely fascinating and i know that i will be seeing a variety of events from amazing recoveries to unforeseen losses. i am constantly asking questions of my colleagues regarding nursing school and their answers lead me to believe that time management will be the most challenging aspect about nursing school. although i have been working on developing my organizational skills in order to make the transition as smooth as possible, i know i will be expected to keep up with the overabundance of new information that i will be absorbing in nursing school.
    i was considering several nursing schools, so i decided to look at nclex scores for each program. according to the texas board of nursing, msu had a 72% pass rate in 2007. while this seems to be a low score, they made many changes in an effort to improve the scores and reached a 91% pass rate in 2008. another aspect i considered in choosing a nursing program were clinicals; they are an important part of nursing school because one has the opportunity to work in almost every setting available in nursing from hospitals, clinics, nursing homes to psych wards . this is important because beginning nurses will be able to figure out which field to go into before getting a job. msu works in conjunction with many clinical sites around the area and involves both rural and urban experiences, which makes it unique.
    after extensive research, i narrowed my choices down to three schools. in order to make the appropriate decision, i clearly needed to visit the campuses, take tours, and consult with the nursing faculty regarding their program. as i sat in an msu classroom, along with other nursing majors, listening to the instructor give an overview of the program, i quickly realized that msu was different. the instructors were very welcoming and answered questions without circumspection. what really caught my attention? the demonstration. msu was the only school where students gave a demonstration. this was quick and simple and made me feel as if i were already a student.

  • 0

    How has being a CNA helped you in nursing school?
    are there any experiences that you think really helped you with school?


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