Associate Degree or BSN?

  1. 0
    I am trying to decide between an Associates degree Nursing program and a accelerated second degree BSN program. My first Bachelors degree will be in social work (graduating in May).
    What do you all think? Are there jobs for Associate degree nurses? The Associate degree program is so much cheaper than the accelerated BSN program and I would be able to take 2-3 classes as semester as opposed to 5 a semester if I go for the BSN...
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    BSN if it is feasible for you. It may be tough now, but you will be much more competitive during your job search. Many hospitals require a BSN, or for magnet accreditation, gear the majority of their nursing staff to BSN requirements. It'll end up costing you money later anyway.
  4. 0
    BSN. It's getting tough out there for the Associate RNs.
  5. 0
    Quote from akanini
    BSN. It's getting tough out there for the Associate RNs.
    I was wondering if i should go for an associates but Im really not sure
  6. 0
    I'd just go straight for your BSN. I know here in Washington, a lot of clinics and hospitals are requiring BSN's now. A lot of the colleges are encouraging students to work straight towards a BSN.
  7. 0
    BSN. Just do it all at once so you don't have to bridge later.
  8. 0
    GBMC hospital recently started only hiring nurses with BSN degrees.
  9. 0
    I would say do the accelerated BSN. The ADN route may be cheaper, but ultimately I believe you will see you could have spent your time more wisely.
  10. 1
    Go for the BSN. Whatever anyone posts here about ADN's having better clinical preparation, or that the associates degree is a less
    expensive alternative, you are going to have a much tougher time finding a job with an associates degree. I have a BA from a prestigious college, which counts for zip in the deluded world of nursing, and an associates degree from a well respected program in NYC.
    Nurse managers in the hospital where we did our clinicals told me that people in our program were better prepared from the students coming from an Ivy League accelerated BSN program. Our school is theoretically attached to a major health care system here, however priority is given to nurses with a BSN. Our nursing school is named after one of the hospitals in this group. Back in the middle ages that meant you got hired directly out of school and went to work. Not anymore. All the hospitals want Magnet status, and they need BSN nurses to fill the quota to qualify.
    The job market is hideous now. It has been a terrible shock after all that I went through in nursing school to find out that I cannot find a job with the degree I have. All around the country associates programs are pumping out new grads, who have limited opportunity of finding work.
    Last edit by scutari212 on Jan 30, '13
    zoe92 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from 1 hopeful nurse
    I am trying to decide between an Associates degree Nursing program and a accelerated second degree BSN program. My first Bachelors degree will be in social work (graduating in May).
    What do you all think? Are there jobs for Associate degree nurses? The Associate degree program is so much cheaper than the accelerated BSN program and I would be able to take 2-3 classes as semester as opposed to 5 a semester if I go for the BSN...
    Thanks for posting this and to everyone else for their advice. I am also trying to figure this out for myself and am leaning towards the accelerated BSN.


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