Reprimanded for reporting medication errors and so much more - page 2

I'm currently a nursing student and while at a clinical facility I noticed that another student failed to give insulin to a patient. So before the end of shift I went over the MAR to make sure that... Read More

  1. by   reprimanded
    I know better than to talk to anyone in a tone that is not professional at any of the facilities that I have been to. Why I didn't tell the student directly about the error was because previously I gave her "heads up" about something that she was not to do and she responded with "I'll think about it". Which then later caused the whole group to get in trouble again with the DND. LadyFree, what you have written pretty much sums up the situation I am in. This is my last term. I have 4 months left and I thought this issue was done and over with since this all happened last term. Apparently, it's not over and I have to continue dealing with this issue and work alongside students who know better but are trying to find easier routes.

    With the "lay low", it's hard when you work in a group. We are all put on the same med carts, partnered up and overseeing the same patients. If I passed 2pm meds on a pt, someone will do the evening medications so there is an overlap.

    What frustrates me is the lack of communication. Nurses give end of shift report to the oncoming nurse, I did that. I just don't understand why people feel the need to disregard information given.

    I'm officially done with this drama and good luck for those who may entrust their family members with these future nurses.

    It's about principles and ethics, which I come to realize people have forgotten.

    I ask myself often, is this really worth it? The drama? The next 4 months of mental anguish, to know I'll graduate and work alongside many nurses like the ones I have encountered.
  2. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from reprimanded
    I ask myself often, is this really worth it? The drama? The next 4 months of mental anguish, to know I'll graduate and work alongside many nurses like the ones I have encountered.
    You will have to ask yourself is it worth it...

    Nursing is not exempt from the human quirks and/or irritations; no profession nor any person. One of the things I've learned as a human is I cannot change behaviors, but learn how to respond to them and maintain integrity in the midst of what I do in this business as well as in life.

    Most of us who have been in it for years work alongside nurses and interact with physicians as well as encounter humans that are stellar, good, bad, or indifferent; most of us have been in a capacity to change unit cultures, as well as gone on to be the change that we seek...those nurses either evolve or don't cut it or other issues...most of us are competent and do what is right-and FOCUS on own our practice on being the best that we can give to this business. I can and I am sure other posters have stories for DAYS about the things that we have seen and heard in regards of many interactions from the patients, doctors, other nurses, and the best of all-administration; but, at the end of the day, the focus is on giving the best nursing practice-no one can take that away from a competent nurse.
  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    I must be missing something here. Nowhere have I seen it posted that the OP was in charge of any other student(s) at that clinical site, nor do I understand why something that happened in the previous term is such a big issue now (and will apparently continue to be, at least until graduation). I'd like to help, but I am having trouble figuring out what to say, other than the fact that when a student witnesses an unsafe practice, it should be reported to the clinical instructor and then left to that instructor to handle.

    It is not the student's job to follow up on the report; the instructor cannot share the results with the reporting student because THAT is a breach of confidentiality. End of story. I think. But then again, maybe not.
  4. by   Marsha238612
    I'm sorry you are going through this(OP) But I agree with VivaLasViejas. I don't understand why you had the audacity to challenge your instructors, by questioning their knowledge and ability to handle any mistakes/errors done by any of your classmates.

    You are there to learn and not to point fingers at what has or hasn't been done. By your post it seems as if you were out checking others work, and running back to your instructor to inform of any oddities.
    I don't like saying this, but nobody likes a "tattletale".

    Hopefully you can learn from this experience and move on.

    Best of luck on your future endeavors
  5. by   wooh
    Quote from reprimanded
    This is taken from my FB:
    ...
    Officially sick of NURSING STUDENTS who think they know everything, if you did or think you do, you wouldn't be a student would you? ...
    Drama often ensues when pots point out the color of kettles.
  6. by   Kuriin
    Sorry you had a rough day. It won't be your last in the world of nursing. The only advice I can give you is that: Please, never ever post anything on Facebook regarding the hospital or about another student or nurse. Good luck. <3
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    As others have said, FORGET FACEBOOK AND OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA. Say not one single word more on any website about yourself, your school, your peers. JUST QUIT IT.
    Stop trying to save other students. I don't know what you mean by working in a group. Can you explain how you or any other student is responsible for any student other than himself or herself?
    If you must say something, just say it quietly and directly to only the other student involved. Don't go tattling to an Instructor or staff member unless a pt is bleeding, not breathing, or otherwise having a very serious emergency.
    Don't expect anyone to be either as terrible as you seem to think we all are, or super human.
    Good luck, keep your head down. Police only yourself.
  8. by   DebblesRN
    Bottom line, the Instructor handles med errors, or any other error that occurs during clinicals. Not you. You seem to be pointing fingers, and at the same time forgetting YOU are ALSO a student. NO-ONE needs to be schooled by you.

    If a fellow student forgets to give a dose of insulin, and you somehow have direct knowledge, report it to your clinical instructor, then DROP IT. It is no longer your problem. People are going to make mistakes because they are students who are still learning. It is up to the clinical instructor how to deal with the problem.

    When you go to school, the best bet is to look after your own interests and the interests of the patients you are directly giving care to. You are not babysitting your classmates, nor are you responsible for their errors or mistakes. I am SURE the instructors know EXACTLY who made which errors and deal with that on an individual basis, and discuss it with the rest of the group as a learning opportunity. I can't believe your grade is suffering for something you had no part of.

    As for the Facebook Post, that was not professional and unnecessary. You are lucky that they did not do anything more than talk to you about it.

    I'm not trying to be mean, and I don't mean to come off so blunt, but other people have tried to explain this in nicer terms, and you argue how you are right and how somehow, everyone posting a response that does not agree with your side of it lacks morals and ethics. Not the case at all. Med errors need to be corrected and dealt with. Making yourself the nosy nelly and tattling to the instructor after reviewing things you were not asked to do or are responsible for makes you look like a pot stirring troublemaker and you will not be popular with your classmates or your instructors should you continue. Take care of YOU. You have four months left, let it go and get through it the best you can.
  9. by   Hygiene Queen
    Reprimanded, I don't know how old you are but you sound rather immature.
    Your behavior is out of line.
    You are not the keeper of your fellow students.
    If you witness a serious error-- yes-- you need to report it to clinical instructor...
    BUT there is a professional way to do it.
    I sense you have a long way to go with understanding professionalism, especially since you did not initially seem to understand what was so unprofessional (and immature) about your FB post.
    Your classmates won't appreciate you for scolding them and your instructors aren't going to give you brownie points for presenting yourself as the savior of the clinical group.
    I was cringing when I read your post!
    Please, do yourself a huge favor and reign it in!
    Also, please be careful of those you so harshly criticize for mistakes... maybe your mistake hasn't happened yet, but it most certainly will.
    Don't worry, we are all pt advocates here, so don't think we aren't.
    The problem with what you did wasn't that you were being a pt advocate, it was the manner in which you attempted to go about it... and it was really rather self-serving, to be honest.
  10. by   cardiacfreak
    I went back and reread through the threads and this is what jumped out at me.

    1. ..."I noticed that another student failed to give insulin to a patient. So before the end of shift I went over the MAR"....
    --Why didn't you give the student a heads up when you noticed the error? If you weren't comfortable going to the student then you should have alerted the instructor.
    --Going over the MAR's for patients that are not in your direct care is a violation of HIPPA.
    2. "I can't believe how many nurses are not seeing the problem >medication error>patient safety.
    --We see the medication problem and we know how it can effect the patient, but we also see a problem that you are not, or are unwilling to see. I believe DebblesRN stated it well.
    3. "Instead people are saying '"lay low"'. Maybe that's how people were raised and taught, but I wasn't taught like that"
    --Do you see this coming off as arrogant, or all-knowing? You are amongst nurses that have been doing this a long time and if a lot of people are telling you the same thing maybe, just maybe, you should heed their warning.
    4. "I realized that nurses are not patient advocates, but rather advocates for their own selfishness"
    --That statement will get many of our tail feathers a-flying. We have been doing this longer than you, some not as long as others, but for those of us who have been around a long time, those can be fighting words.

    I really hope you at least heed the advise about social media, that was sooooo wrong. It is not your job to plead that student nurses know how insulin works, that is the job of the instructor. It is not your place to tell others not to argue back at a RN/LPN, we are big girls and boys, and can hold our own.

    I hope you can take all of our comments as constructive criticism. Please wait a few days, reread this thread, and try to see where we are coming from. Remember we are nurses and we are human. I have made more than one med error in my career, I am not proud of it, but it happens.

    You also made a comment something about feeling sorry for the patients that these nurses take care of. Just remember when you get out on the floor with your degree one day, you may need a nurse around to help you out. Don't burn any bridges, Love. I am glad to see that you do take patient care seriously and I can tell you will be a patient advocate...just slow your roll, okay?
    Last edit by cardiacfreak on Oct 30, '13 : Reason: nurses are not just girls
  11. by   Esme12
    Quote from reprimanded
    I know better than to talk to anyone in a tone that is not professional at any of the facilities that I have been to. Why I didn't tell the student directly about the error was because previously I gave her "heads up" about something that she was not to do and she responded with "I'll think about it". Which then later caused the whole group to get in trouble again with the DND. LadyFree, what you have written pretty much sums up the situation I am in. This is my last term. I have 4 months left and I thought this issue was done and over with since this all happened last term. Apparently, it's not over and I have to continue dealing with this issue and work alongside students who know better but are trying to find easier routes.

    With the "lay low", it's hard when you work in a group. We are all put on the same med carts, partnered up and overseeing the same patients. If I passed 2pm meds on a pt, someone will do the evening medications so there is an overlap.

    What frustrates me is the lack of communication. Nurses give end of shift report to the oncoming nurse, I did that. I just don't understand why people feel the need to disregard information given.

    I'm officially done with this drama and good luck for those who may entrust their family members with these future nurses.

    It's about principles and ethics, which I come to realize people have forgotten.

    I ask myself often, is this really worth it? The drama? The next 4 months of mental anguish, to know I'll graduate and work alongside many nurses like the ones I have encountered.
    Here is the thing you....are a student. I advocate for my patients....without fail! For 35 years.

    It is not the message it's your delivery. You are usurping your instructors authority....undermining her abilities. Never a good place as a student. Even when you become a nurse..if you see something wrong you report it to the next up in the food chain...period. You don't start checking charts and med sheets. Technically....now days that is a HIPAA violation. Not your patient you have no business in that record....ever.

    You are appearing to be a "tattle tale" and a bully yourself by placing others in a bad light....and looking for it! Never a good thing. It is appropriate to have high standards and want others to be the same...however you are not their boss nor their keeper. Your instructor is. You are overstepping your boundaries.

    You will encounter those who probably aren't the best nurses...but you will need to learn to work around them. Of course if there is a med error or abuse ....you report it...to the next person in charge...that is their responsibility...otherwise you are threatening their authority and a troublesome employee/student who is not a team player. You are responsible for you.

    Doing the right thing isn't always the easy path..there are sometimes consequences for doing the right thing. I have loudly spoken for what is right and there are times it cost me and once, no twice, it cost me my job. I knew it probably would and I decided it was worth it to me. What's right is right. But I also had the background of experience.

    Was it fair? NO. Were they right for what they did? NO. However, I didn't blame others. I took full responsibility my actions and would do it again. But you are in a vulnerable position..you are a student and have little authority. You are at their mercy. Wait for graduation to change the world. Follow your chain of command....always.

    Reporting the med error was appropriate.....checking the MAR for further mistakes other people made...not appropriate.

    Saying ANYTHING on social media NEVER appropriate, is unprofessional....and it may have consequences. Even here...while AN is anonymous it is public and can be read by the general public.... people are easier to identify than anyone thinks. You school or instructor may be reading this right now.

    Something to keep in mind.
  12. by   Esme12
    Quote from reprimanded
    This is taken from my FB:

    "Dear Fellow Nursing Students,

    Please, please know how insulin works!! Fellow students are there to help you and save your ass. If you don't want your ass saved, please make it clear!

    Also, NEVER EVER argue or talk back to a RN OR a LVN who is EMPLOYED!! She/He is LICENSED and we are NOT!!! Nod your head and apologize for your MED ERROR!!!"

    Nursing isn't what it is anymore. Instead of ensuring patient safety, I have to weigh if I want to voice my concern with the possibility of getting in trouble for doing the right thing or just pretend like I never knew nothing about anything.
    But aren't you doing the same thing? Thinking you know more than everyone else? That you are superior somehow and take it upon yourself to do the right thing because you are the only one who does the right thing?

    Nursing is nursing....you can't go around editing everyone elses behavior as inadequate. There are rules....chain of command to follow. Doing the right thing has it's own costs. You need to accept that. You can't go into a china shop and shove over all the shelves...it makes people angry.

    YOu used social media to call out your fellow students. NO bueno.

    How would you feel if they posted...
    Officially sick of NURSING STUDENTS who think they know everything, if you did or think you do, you wouldn't be a student would you? Nursing students do NOT know everything! It is NOT YOUR JOB to have your nose in EVERYONE'S business!!! That is the teacher job!!! SHE HAS A LICENSE AND YOU DO NOT!!! What makes you think you KNOW BETTER?? You run around checking everyone elses work when that is the instructors job!! She/He is LICENSED and we are NOT!!! Nod your head and apologize for you usurping her authority!!
    Not very professional is it?

    It is not WHAT you are doing but HOW you are doing it.

    Think about how to better handle this situation.
  13. by   cardiacfreak
    OP, I hope we haven't scared you off of this forum. Your last sentence was "I need to know what should I do". We are only trying to help you. I know it seems we all ganged up on you, but believe me these are not vicious, vindictive, hateful nurses. They are here to mentor, teach, correct, and assist you along your career. They will, however, let you know if you are wrong.

    There is nothing wrong with making mistakes as long as you learn from them and never make them again.

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