Why do so many people insist that LPN'S AREN'T REAL NURSES!!?? - page 4

I mean, the title does have "Nurse" in it.So why are so many people insisting that LPN's arent real nurses? When I go to the hospital, I see these people giving medication , care, comfort and other... Read More

  1. by   Markthemalenurse
    Quote from HeatherLPN
    an LPN is still a nurse, still has skills, and an LPN with 20+ years experience is going to be able to teach you a heck of a lot. It's not about the title, it's about how you care for people, whether you're a CNA, LPN, RN or higher.
    :yeahthat:

    After I graduated from nursing school, I would routinely go to the LPNs I worked with for help and advice and still do. I can't say anything but nice things about LPNs. And as for those people who say they are not real nurses, I say hogwash!!!
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    I wondered when you would come and put in your opinion.





    Quote from lindarn
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  3. by   moongirl
    Quote from lindarn
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    hmm.. the LPN program in my area is 11 months, not 9, and I have had primary nurses as a student who are LPNS and they do all the jobs the RN does, right down to IV push and blood. They were all great nurses, and to me there was no difference in the RNs or the LPNs. The difference I see right here with your post is ATTITUDE- which from reading this and a few of your other posts- you obviously think you are far superior to anyone who has a day less schooling than you do. I feel extremely fortunate to have never had a primary/educator/instructor such as you, and feel sorry for the LPNs, CNAs and PTAs who have to work with you.
    I do believe we are called a health care TEAM- or are they teaching me incorrectly in my program?
    Last edit by moongirl on Sep 13, '06
  4. by   nursedawn67
    I think it is because people hear only about RN's and with the ignorance of publicity they don't even mention LPN's. So people go with what they hear. When people find out I'm a LPN and know what I do for a living I get commended for it. I think it really is just ignorance that make people feel Rn's are the only real nurses.
  5. by   Noryn
    Someone touched upon this but you dont have how many times I have heard patients say, "I want a real nurse." They honestly think RN means "real nurse" so if you arent a RN in their eyes you arent a nurse. I love LPNs! I think there should be 1 RN, 1 LPN and 1 CNA to every 5 patients (on a telemetry or med surg floor). The problem with LPNs is that boards of nursing along with accrediting organizations have severly limited what they can do in many cases. In my state they cannot push medications, in the unit they could not have a patient 2 shifts in a row, are very limited in doing a "nursing assessment", could not call the doctor, etc. Combine that with the fact that hospital or other agencies can pay techs 6-7 dollars an hour and train them to do things such as catheterization, accu checks and even medication administration in my state then what is the point in hiring them? As a matter of fact there is no local hospital in my area hiring LPNs at this time.

    I do worry about LPNs, they don't have a voice. RNs are threatened by them, "techs" are allowed to do almost the same things with training, and medical assistants are in direct competition with them. The training LPNs go through is very intensive and I will go so far as to say this, it is probably harder and more time intensive than my AD program.

    It is so sad, people focus on education alone when there is so much more to the big picture. I salute the LPNs! We RNs often complain about lack of respect, pay, etc when there is a group that gets less of these than we do.
  6. by   tigress_8207
    From the many post i've read it seems that the LPN's are thought of just like nursing assistants.Since they are not RN's people don't see them as real nurses.
  7. by   Fiona59
    Under my license, I AM responsible for MY patient load. My education was four semesters not nine months.

    I've had RN's who trained back in hospital programmes tell me that PN's are the bedside nurses and have more skills today than RN grads of 20 years ago.
  8. by   new_mom2005
    Quote from jo272wv
    I am a R.N. and I work in a hospital where LPNs are hired to help take the load off the RNs. The LPNs pretty much do their own patient care with the exception of pushing narcotics, and assessments. I have a lot of respect for these nurses for they know their skills but I also encourage them to continue on with their education to become an RN and reap the benifits of the higher pay since they do as much as the RNs. Real nurses are anyone that provides paitent care, that is my opinion.
    I like what you said...........and reap the benifits of the higher pay since they do as much as the RNs. Real nurses are anyone that provides paitent care,
    I COULD NOT HAVE SAID IT BETTER MYSELF
  9. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from lindarn
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    :deadhorse Same horse, different day...
  10. by   Dalzac
    I just retired after 33 yrs as a LPN and I have lstened the same thing. Usually it is the grad that comes into the setting with this attitutued. It used to bother me but I watched many a RN choke on what they had said to me. esp in a dire situation. All f my experience is ICU,CCU,ER, and even a little research nursing. One of the funniest things was while I was going to school was an RN that came in for the day to teach arrythmias was a nurse I taught them to (I was a Monitor Tech for a very large Hospital) and she told the instuctors that I taught her and I got excused for the day. I took my kids to the Zoo and had a great time and aced the test the next day.
  11. by   RNsRWe
    And then there was the time, just weeks from graduating from my RN program after the better part of four years of classes and clinicals, when one patient's wife asked me if I was planning to "go on to get my LPN after graduation". Sigh. I had introduced myself as a student nurse, and met her as I was tidying up the bedside stuff while her hubby was in the john, so perhaps I didn't look....um....scholarly enough for her!

    I grinned and gave her the ten second comparison of the programs, and assured her that I was already about to become "a real nurse" (she used the term, not me)!

    Maybe she thought more letters equalled a higher education. Got me! Sometimes you've gotta see the humor in some of it, right?
  12. by   nursejoelle
    Quote from lindarn
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Interesting...and thanks for your input. I'll rely on credible information instead of opinions in this case. I've provided you with a reference from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing: http://www.ncsbn.org/news/stateupdat...e_shortage.asp

    As you can see LPNs are quite in demand and probably will be for the forseeable future. JMHO.:wink2: One more thing...as far as I know...most all nurses wear their heart on their sleeve, not their credentials. Just something to think about.
    Last edit by nursejoelle on Sep 13, '06
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from tigress_8207
    From the many post i've read it seems that the LPN's are thought of just like nursing assistants.Since they are not RN's people don't see them as real nurses.

    Really, I don't see many posts like that at all here. Perhaps a few, but I've never noticed. Anyway, don't judge the real world by a message board.

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