There are no practical nurses in my country...

  1. It was my first day in orientation at a new facility and there was myself and two other RN's. One RN seemed very pleasant, yet the other turns to me and says, it is hard getting used to this country, in my country there were only RN's. I just smiled. But I also noticed that the unpleasant RN was even making rude faces when the other RN asked a few questions. My question is, is this a common attitude among some RN's because honestly I haven't seen this too often, most seem to be quite pleasant and helpful.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Unfortunately, there are some RNs who don't hold a very high opinion of practical nurses. However, most RNs that I've encountered have been helpful and respectful.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from linzz
    It was my first day in orientation at a new facility and there was myself and two other RN's. One RN seemed very pleasant, yet the other turns to me and says, it is hard getting used to this country, in my country there were only RN's. I just smiled. But I also noticed that the unpleasant RN was even making rude faces when the other RN asked a few questions. My question is, is this a common attitude among some RN's because honestly I haven't seen this too often, most seem to be quite pleasant and helpful.
    Not all RNs are this way, however, as theCommuter stated, there are some that do think of themselves to be superior to LPNs. Actually, you may even find some LPNs that are rude to newcomers. The nasty one you mentioned seems to simply be an unpleasent person in general, and needs few excuses to be rude.

    What I have found with some RNs is that while they may not have anything against LPNs in general, the frustration may come from the fact that LPNs are more limited in how we may assist them. FOr example, most states do not allow us to do bolus medications, central lines, and in my clinic, while we can medicate and vaccinate mostly everything, we can't administer flu or pneumonia vaccination without an RN to screen, and this backs up the clinic, and RNs are dealing with the more emergent situations...yet, we have to come and request that they screen a patient. This is something we can generally do ourselves, but now, protocol is that they must be screened. Continue to smile, no matter how sarcastic that smile may be. Some people hate maturity...:chuckle
  5. by   kstec
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Unfortunately, there are some RNs who don't hold a very high opinion of practical nurses. However, most RNs that I've encountered have been helpful and respectful.
    You will find that there is definitely a hierarchy of nursing. It is totally unfortunate. We all went into the nursing field to take care of people or atleast I would hope so, but why is there such a tier of superiority? We all contribute to the field in our own unique way and I think that should be what it ultimately comes down too. During my LPN clinicals I asked a RN why the hospital have done away with LPN's and her response left a real bad taste in my mouth for the whole nursing profession. She said "their needy, their inconvenient, and they don't know how to critical think." At that time I was gathering information on my patient for the next day and needless to say I walked out of there crying. The next day I had to work under her during clinicals. We were both taking care of a patient who had all types of issues, on of which was a new trach. The patient was having a hard time breathing do to her new form of breathing. I checked the equipment and everything checked out. The RN I was working under proceeded to tell my patient that she had been a critical care nurse and she knew that nothing was wrong and that if she attempted to pull out her trach she would restrain her. After that day I knew I would be the better nurse even though I was a LPN. Why because I showed my patient compassion and the RN showed the patient intimidation.
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from kstec
    You will find that there is definitely a hierarchy of nursing. It is totally unfortunate. We all went into the nursing field to take care of people or atleast I would hope so, but why is there such a tier of superiority? We all contribute to the field in our own unique way and I think that should be what it ultimately comes down too. During my LPN clinicals I asked a RN why the hospital have done away with LPN's and her response left a real bad taste in my mouth for the whole nursing profession. She said "their needy, their inconvenient, and they don't know how to critical think." At that time I was gathering information on my patient for the next day and needless to say I walked out of there crying. The next day I had to work under her during clinicals. We were both taking care of a patient who had all types of issues, on of which was a new trach. The patient was having a hard time breathing do to her new form of breathing. I checked the equipment and everything checked out. The RN I was working under proceeded to tell my patient that she had been a critical care nurse and she knew that nothing was wrong and that if she attempted to pull out her trach she would restrain her. After that day I knew I would be the better nurse even though I was a LPN. Why because I showed my patient compassion and the RN showed the patient intimidation.
    It is interesting how a higher ranking nurse can show you what NOT to be. I think that one of the things that may be lacking in the RN cirriculum is the purpose and function of LPNs. We are primarily the implementation portion of the nursing process and we are working under the direction of an RN or a physician. Basically, we are not independent practioners. However, I notice that there are many that lack common sense and respect. The comment she made was assaultive...but I assume that she forgot that portion of the course in fundamentals.
  7. by   linzz
    I just remembered that I was listening to the two RN's talk during this orientation this morning and nasty RN says to nice RN that all shifts are easy because you can keep your residents under control by using chemical or physical restraints whenever you need them. I did not hear any mention of a Dr. order. Nice RN just looked at her like she was insane. I hope I don't have to work with nasty RN too much, but I likely won't because she said she will not work anything but days and I figure being new, I will not be on days often. Sigh.
  8. by   allantiques4me
    Quote from kstec
    You will find that there is definitely a hierarchy of nursing. It is totally unfortunate. We all went into the nursing field to take care of people or atleast I would hope so, but why is there such a tier of superiority? We all contribute to the field in our own unique way and I think that should be what it ultimately comes down too. During my LPN clinicals I asked a RN why the hospital have done away with LPN's and her response left a real bad taste in my mouth for the whole nursing profession. She said "their needy, their inconvenient, and they don't know how to critical think." At that time I was gathering information on my patient for the next day and needless to say I walked out of there crying. The next day I had to work under her during clinicals. We were both taking care of a patient who had all types of issues, on of which was a new trach. The patient was having a hard time breathing do to her new form of breathing. I checked the equipment and everything checked out. The RN I was working under proceeded to tell my patient that she had been a critical care nurse and she knew that nothing was wrong and that if she attempted to pull out her trach she would restrain her. After that day I knew I would be the better nurse even though I was a LPN. Why because I showed my patient compassion and the RN showed the patient intimidation.
    I cant believe the unprofessional attitude of the RN you encountered!!Iknow,myself,Ive encountered RNs that didnt remember you dont put more than 3ccs in an IM injection.Also there were times I was the one criticallythinking .Anyways I take pride in my compassionate nature.I too believe you should try to be as kind as you could.Like I said in another thread,the person in the bed could be your mother,father brother ,ect.you know what I mean.Also ,some nurses need to remember to also be empathetic.How would you feel if you had a trache/Ventilator?I would be scared to death!!And I would alsoTreasure a compassionate ,knowledgable nurse to calm me(even aknowledgable Cna)Ive found in my many years in the medical field,the nurses that portray a know-it-all-attitude are the worst,and first to make an error.Remember your kind nature always.
  9. by   moodychick
    Yes, I think most RN's are respectful of LPN's. I had a student nurse in an ADN program that I had just met tell me that LPN's were obsolete and I should start looking for a new job or go back to school. I've been in this ER for 34 years and she was doing her clinicals! I've met other students who were happy to find out what I could teach them. It takes all kinds. I try to let it run off my back and not take it too seriously.:wink2:
  10. by   RN34TX
    Quote from kstec
    During my LPN clinicals I asked a RN why the hospital have done away with LPN's and her response left a real bad taste in my mouth for the whole nursing profession. She said "their needy, their inconvenient, and they don't know how to critical think."
    That's funny.
    Even though my hospital eliminated LPN's years ago, that's how I'd still describe some of my co-workers......needy, inconvenient, and severely lacking in the ability to critically think.

    I guess those traits aren't unique to LPN's and I guess getting rid of them won't get rid of needy and incompetent nurses.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from RN34TX
    That's funny.
    Even though my hospital eliminated LPN's years ago, that's how I'd still describe some of my co-workers......needy, inconvenient, and severely lacking in the ability to critically think.

    I guess those traits aren't unique to LPN's and I guess getting rid of them won't get rid of needy and incompetent nurses.
    Right on!
  12. by   kstec
    Hi everyone
    It's interesting to find that the more I feel isolated as an LPN with the judgemental attitudes from others, talking to other LPN's I feel less isolated. I am really proud of my accomplishments. I'm the first person in my family to step into a college. To some I may only be an LPN but to me and my family it's comparible to being a doctor. I hope there will come a day when everyone in the healthcare field (especially nursing) can just work together and utilize each persons individualized talent they have to offer to the field. From housekeeping to the DON, we all are supposed to be doing a job of making the quality and quantity of care the best we can for our patients. Oh to slightly change the subject, has anyone read the thread under geriatrics? I worked in a LTC facility for 4 days and quit. I was not only new to the facility but I just passed boards in August 2006. I was shown how to pass meds (real fast) and that was it. Then I was expected to be the only nurse to be responsible for 35-40 patients. OH NO, that wasn't going to happen. Instead of being shown different policies and procedures and where paper work was kept, I was told to read the 1000 page policy and procedure book during the day. Oh yeah, I had tons of time for that, NOT!!! I feel bad that I quit so soon, but I was not about to hurt a patient with understaffing, lack of training and absolute lack of procedures. You would think in any health care facility they would rather have more staff and less law suits. Don't you think law suits would go down if staff went up and all in all wouldn't the cost even be cheaper? Just a practical thought.
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    It is really scary looking for a job and hearing some of the horror stories of new as well as incumbant LPNs being responsible for over 40 patients ALONE!! I already don't think that I know enough, and to have that responsibility would make me run for the hills!! Sometimes, it makes me think that I may just remain in 'safe' places just to hold on to my license.

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