LPN'S are NURSES TOO - page 5

We, LPN'S need to speak up more and grab the attention of administrators,Legislators, (State and Federal) Governors ,the public and anybody else who views the RN as the only true nurse. Just the same... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from icugirl33
    If an LPN could assess,perform IV's,ect..Then you would be an RN.
    Just more evidence of how so many RN programs are severely lacking in educating their students on LPN practice.

    I just can't believe the number of RN's who are put into positions to "supervise" LPN's and have this minimal level of knowledge about their education and/or scope of practice.
  2. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from joyrck9
    Here in NY LPN's perform ongoing assessments, insert IV's and administer IV medication
    LPN's can assess but must report to an RN. IV's require special certification. Administering IV meds is part of the LPN scope, but not starting, without special cert, again.

    Many LPN's in NYS, including me, often practice beyond what their licenses permit them to do, particularly in LTC.
  3. by   foxxcat
    Quote from icugirl33
    Why do LPN's compare themselves to RN's? Of course you are all nurses, the last time I checked only RNs and LPNs can call themselves nurses. However, I haven't seen one Nurse Practice Act in any state that didn't call for the LPN to work under the directions of an RN. If an LPN could assess,perform IV's,ect..Then you would be an RN. Be proud of who you are.

    In addition, the public does have the right to ask you whether you are an RN or LPN. If the question offends you, you need to analyse why it does.I have asked practitioners if they are the MD,NP, or PA and none of them get bend out of shape. Everyone has a different scope of practice & regardless of whether you've been an LPN for 100 yrs, don't perform services on me or any other pt for that matter unless you are not legally suppose to perform it.
    I really don't know either but so do feel that way , when I am asked what kind of nurse I am I say A GOOD NURSE , one that can care for you and will do the best job possible and make sure your taken good care of
  4. by   lorelei40
    Quote from Suesquatch
    I've never been asked if I'm an rN or LPN by anyone. Ever.
    me either
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from RN34TX
    Just more evidence of how so many RN programs are severely lacking in educating their students on LPN practice.

    I just can't believe the number of RN's who are put into positions to "supervise" LPN's and have this minimal level of knowledge about their education and/or scope of practice.
    That is so true....I have RNs that have no idea what my scope of practice is and if I am not careful, it can really place me in a spot.
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from icugirl33
    Why do LPN's compare themselves to RN's? Of course you are all nurses, the last time I checked only RNs and LPNs can call themselves nurses. However, I haven't seen one Nurse Practice Act in any state that didn't call for the LPN to work under the directions of an RN. If an LPN could assess,perform IV's,ect..Then you would be an RN. Be proud of who you are.

    In addition, the public does have the right to ask you whether you are an RN or LPN. If the question offends you, you need to analyse why it does.I have asked practitioners if they are the MD,NP, or PA and none of them get bend out of shape. Everyone has a different scope of practice & regardless of whether you've been an LPN for 100 yrs, don't perform services on me or any other pt for that matter unless you are not legally suppose to perform it.
    I did take some time to analyze why the question of if I am an LPN bothers me. I realized that I don't like it when other staff inquire. For me, what makes it offensive is that once I respond, a certain impression of my capabilities becomes questionable. I have had people think that because I choose to remain an LPN that I am not ambitious, I am limited and maybe even ignorant to basic nursing knowledge. We cannot control how the PUBLIC/PATIENTS may perceive us, however, fellow nurses (RNs in particular, in most of my experiences), may opt to blow us off. It really doesn't bug me as much when a patient questions, unless they say it in a condescending manner...then, I have to count to 100 and make serious attempts to remain in control...I must admit. But regularly, most patients really don't comprehend the difference the way that they think they do.

    Patients have to be educated to comprehend that in a clinical setting, (in most cases), the person that has come to serve them is appropriately delegated according to their license, certification and job description. I attempt to explain that to those that seem to be concerned about whether it is appropriate for an LPN or RN to give a flu shot (just an example).
  7. by   dermnrs66
    This discussion is EXACTLY how I located this web site. Searching through the various states for scope of practice guidelines for LPN?LVN. I attended a Dermatology Nurses Association convention in Washington DC last week. I attended a LPN forum where the biggest topic was "why are LPNs working in dermatology and members of the association not able to sit for the certification exam and be recognized for the advanced level of skill" the answer, because we are not RNs.
    Then began a convoluted explanation of how to be certified, we needed to develope a task force, compile scopes of practice for all the states, request permission to develope a course, write exam questions and obtain approval by the certification board to have our own exam- oh, and we have to find funding of course.
    Keep in mind the duties of the LPN and RN within the dermatologic office in our area of the country anyway- is exactly the same. In fact we don't hire RNs.
    There seems to be a definate issue-not with all RNs but I have to tell you the majority of the ones I met in DC. I felt as if they were afraid to lose some type of superiority of LPNs and medical assistants. Truth is, we would probably have a higher percentage of passing scores on the exam, since we are the ones doing all the hands on and patient education let alone meeting with the pharm reps to discuss product/medication updates.

    well, it may be a long battle, but I think it is one well worth it to unite LPN/LVN nationally with standards of practice. Who knows, maybe we'll wvwn educate a few "Real Nurses" along the way.
  8. by   kstec
    Speaking of are LPN's nurses too, I had a sad thing happen at work today. I had a residents daughter come up to the nurses station and ask if I was the RN taking care of her father, I said "No", that I was the LPN taking care of her father and she then said " Well I guess you'll have to do." I then went in to her father's room and did an assessment and ended up sending him out to the ER for a workup. Anyway I felt like the biggest piece of sh..
    It's bad enough that I'm a new grad LPN, but then to feel your not good enough. I was quite hurt. Oh well, I did my best and can't honestly think of anything that a RN would of done different in the care of her father.
  9. by   jill48
    [quote=pagandeva2000;1995660] I was in orientation with a few RNs and one of them asked me if I wanted to become a nurse, and I told her "I already am".
    OMG! How did you keep your composure? That would have made me so angry.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from RN34TX

    I just can't believe the number of RN's who are put into positions to "supervise" LPN's and have this minimal level of knowledge about their education and/or scope of practice.
    This bears repeating. :hatparty:
  11. by   kstec
    I've overheard RN's with their BSN ask RN's with their ADN if they are going to go back and get their BSN. I think that nursing in general is a big hierarchy of whose got the most education. If I did go back and get my RN ADN, then someone would ask when am I going to get my BSN, and then my Masters, and then my NP. You can go to school forever if you want. I started school after I had kids and I know I could go all the way, but that is not my priority right now or probably never will be. I like working prn and being home with my children when I want to. This is a career change for me to test out. If I like it, great, if not, I'll move on (either up the nursing ladder or out the door of nursing). But for now I'm content with the enormous responsibility that wee little LPN's have.
  12. by   jalease
    Hey everyone, I too am proud to be a LPN I work in a dialysis unit, where I have had all except one RN tell me that I was nothing but a PCA, to include the supervisor/clinical director. I've had the comments made that they have much more education and a better understanding of what's going on with our patients and the human body. You should have seen their faces when I told them I held a B.S in Biology/Psychology with experience in cardiology. Also, that I had over 15 hours in Health Care Administration.
    I chose not to pursue my RN because I believed in patient care, most new RN's are in it for the money and spend very little time really caring for the patient, both physically and mentally/emotionally.
    Last edit by jalease on Feb 6, '07 : Reason: mispelled word
  13. by   dermnrs66
    I have read every posting, and yes I too have met my share of uninformed RNs, ARNP and public. I believe that is the problem. People in general, as well as RNs and Advanced practitioners just don't know what we can do. Depending on our state, we can do many things. Some states are very restrictive, some more liberal. I don't think people outside the LPN/LVN community really know what , or who we are. WE ARE QUALIFIED CAPABLE NURSES.
    I can honestly say that 3 days out of 5 I go home knowing that I made a difference in somebody's life. The pay ain't great, but the reward is so much better. I am content where I am professionally, until some uninformed individual verbalizes a slight against my abilities. Then, yes I question, should I go back to school to get that piece of paper that says I can do, what I am already doing. I am blessed enough to have people within my organisation remind me frequently what an outstanding job I am doing. I work with an amazing MD and a NP who started out as a LPN frm the same school I graduated from. Not everyone is as lucky.

    I understand the frustration, but maybe we need to focus on educating the rest of the medical community as far as what we are capable of both legally and by performance. We know what we do, we know our own value, so maybe we need to let every one else in on this well kept industry secret!!

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