LPN'S are NURSES TOO - page 2

We, LPN'S need to speak up more and grab the attention of administrators,Legislators, (State and Federal) Governors ,the public and anybody else who views the RN as the only true nurse. Just the same... Read More

  1. by   imnrs2
    Hello skantc You are absolutely right in saying to HOLD OUR HEADS UP HIGH. and.....I do now because I have learned to do so. I accept the additional responsability . This is why I want to raise consiousness of the policy makers . That lpn's can and do perform these skills with integrity for the profession.
  2. by   imnrs2
    nursekhat, It's how you view yourself . That you are a professional and valuable member of health care team. This is what i want all LPN's to present. BE PROUD OF YOUR ACCOMPLISHMENT......
  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    I've never been asked if I'm an rN or LPN by anyone. Ever.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from foxxcat
    I am very happy being JUST AN LPN, I AM GOOD AT WHAT I DO AND I DON'T CARE ANYMORE ABOUT WHO IS AN RN, THEY CAN'T HOLD A LIGHT T THE EXPERIENCE I HAVE GAINED IN 21 YEARS
    LPN'S ARE THE BEST HOLD YOUR HEADS UP HIGH AND DO THE BEST YOU CAN FOR YOUR RESIDENTS FOR THEY DON'T CARE THAT WE ARE LPN'S THEY JUST CARE THAT WE ARE THER E AND TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM
    NO PUSH PAPER AND BARK ORDERS(OH THAT WAS MEAN, SORRY)
    1st - yes that was kind of mean. No need to tear someone else down to hold your head high. Also, don't say "just an LPN"...........

    Quote from Suesquatch
    I've never been asked if I'm an rN or LPN by anyone. Ever.
    When I say "I'm a nurse" people have on occasion asked "are you an RN or LPN". Don't know why. Patients however, rarely ask and I've never had one express a preference for one or the other. They know we are all equally competent because the LPNs where I work are top notch.
  5. by   mc3
    How about this one? We just got a memo before Christmas stating that RN's would receive a $100 bonus as well as time and a half for working Christmas and New Year's Day, but LPN's got only time and a half ..nothing extra....from my own agency!!! Also, our team assistant forwarded a voice mail to us the other day - for the nurses, she said - and, oh, for the LPN's too....I've gotten tired of nicely correcting her.
    Also, I joined the NFLPN for a few years, but I found nothing substantial done in the way of promoting LPN's to justify paying the membership fee. Wish I could say I did, but I didn't.....
    I agree - would love to join something!!!
    mc3
  6. by   imnrs2
    mc3 This is exactly the kind of disgraceful thinking towards the LPN's that I have been talking about. :angryfire I'm thinking that this is subjective thinking on the RN and Administration based on fear and need for control and power for their own distorted thinking . I believe that this reflects negitively on the nursing profession as a whole . I'm sorry that we have to deal with the politics of our profession . But... so be it
  7. by   teeka48
    The problem started when hospitals began training CNA's to be Unlicensed Assistive Personel or UAP's. I get so PO'd :angryfire when people ask if I am a "real nurse". I have had my brains picked by more RN's than I care to remember. It's a miricle I have any info left. in 6 months LPN's have more experience and knowledge related to patient care than an RN student has in a year. I actually had a supervisor say she never did a straight cath on a ptient and she was supervising 6 LPN's in a LTC facility. how sad for her.
    I am concidering leaving the profession. I am sick of being the only nurse for 60 patients on the night shift and not being able to find CNA's & Supervisors when I need them. ( Where do they hide?) i wish i knew. any way, I think getting out is the best route.
  8. by   allantiques4me
    Experience is really important.I agree.I think we need to quit judging people as a whole.I personally am trying to quit judging people ,as it is wrong.Ya know,why is an RN better than an LPn??Its not cause theyre smarter.Time and circumstances do not allow everyone to go to school that long,be it financial,familial,or other reasons.So I dont get why some people dont respect LPNs as nurses.Or even the same scenario for CNAs.Maybe financial,or other circumstances prevent them from becoming an RN.tHe bottom line is we need to quit judging others.JMO
  9. by   napnes
    I have to agree completely with the initial post with one minor exception. As an individual it is very difficult to get to regulators, this is the job of professional associations. As Jules put it, it is important to join your professional association. For example, an individual LPN will never be invited to attend and serve on a panel of all the boards of nursing, but we are.

    Professional associations provide research, standards, and much more. While you may not recognize it in your daily work, your professional association is responsible for the fact that you are a "nurse" and have a career.

    NAPNES (National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service) has been around since 1941. We represent LPNs / LVNs, PN Schools, students and educators. We just recently created a new eMembership which is just $35.00 for LPNs/LVNs and just $10.00 for students.

    Right now, NAPNES is working on updating National PN Education Standards, conducting a nationwide survey of the LPN/LVN and their role in infusion therapy, our executive director is a paenlist for the National Council State Board of Nursing's "Transition Summit" that will be held next month in Chicago.

    Back to standards for a minute, when the association has approved the national education standards, NAPNES Council of Practical Nurse Educators will create new curricula standards. Rest assured, we are including assesment, infusion therapy and more. In fact, it was NAPNES that got pharmacology as part of every LPN program and that work began in the 1960s.

    So stand-up because yes you are a nurse and your license says just that!!!! But remember, the best way for us to stick together and make sure that our profession grows and continues is to support your professional association.

    To find out more about NAPNES, go to our website at www.napnes.org!
  10. by   DeeDee143
    Quote from nurse hobbit
    for all lpn's, i am an lpn and darn proud to be one! i have had several veteran rn's tell me that i am one of the best nurse's they have ever worked with.
    it seems that there will always be some type of tension between any memeber of the health care team. i had this one rn' tell me that "yeah you are a nurse, but i have more education that you do being an rn". my reply was tell me how all those world history , economics, english etc, ect ect have to do with taking care of a patient?" she didn't answer right away.
    yes, i understand that rn's have more schooling, and the apnr has more than rn and the np more. so see it is a never ending cycle.
    again i am very proud to be a lpn!! and most of my patients could care less of what title i carry, when they are in pain, stress or anyother crisis they just want their "nurse' to help them.
    just me and my thoughts!

    you go girl. im in lvn school and a cna and have came across some self centered and cocky rn's.as i am learning in my clincals and at work you have to hold your ground.you would think as people become nurses they would have compassion and not just towards patient's but people in general,period.thats what i can't seem to understand why some nurses are like that.matter of fact, yesterday i had a rn came in and said hi sitter(i was sitting that day) not my name but my title and i wanted so badly wanted to say hi rn, but i had my patient's family in there.next time i here that i will use that expression.love it!
    Last edit by DeeDee143 on Jan 14, '07
  11. by   butterfly26pn
    I find this thread interesting. I had never heard of this attiude before and Ive been a cna for 5 yrs and a cma during a period of that time. I just recently received my LPN. I had not hear of this attitude till while I was in school and a family member of a pt., of all people, had said to me several times "So will you be planning to go to school to be REAL nurse after you get your LPN" . I said to her "I WILL be a REAL nurse!" This got under my skin because I had never come across this and didn't realize that people felt this way. I don't know yet if I will go on to RN school or not , school has taken a lot out of my life and my childrens, we will see. But if I do go on its not going to be because I feel people are looking down on me, I don't care if they are. Im proud to be a LPN and it took A LOT of hard work to become one.
    Last edit by butterfly26pn on Jan 17, '07
  12. by   bshbae
    I have always heard that LPN's are not true nurses, but reading these post I think that statment is very horrible. I am currently in school and trying to get acceptedin the program for RN but I have heard that it is easier to get acceppted into the LPN program. If there are any LPN's out there please shed a little light on my concerns. HELP ME...... By the way, A NURSE IS A NURSE REGARDLESS OF YOUR TITLE...if that's why you are a nurse than GET A CLUE......
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from butterfly26pn
    I find this thread interesting. I had never heard of this attiude before and Ive been a cna for 5 yrs and a cma during a period of that time. I just recently received my LPN. I had not hear of this attitude till while I was in school and a family member of a pt., of all people, had said to me several times "So will you be planning to go to school to be REAL nurse after you get your LPN" . I said to her "I WILL be a REAL nurse!" This got under my skin because I had never come across this and didn't realize that people felt this way. I don't know yet if I will go on to RN school or not , school has taken a lot out of my life and my childrens, we will see. But if I do go on its not going to be because I feel people are looking down on me, I don't care if they are. Im proud to be a LPN and it took A LOT of hard work to become one.
    I have heard this for YEARS...but I didn't let it get me down. I currently work in a clinic and I have not been really treated as though I am not a viable member of the team by my co-workers, but I did have some casual friends criticize my decision to become an LPN rather than an RN and once, when administering a PPD implant, I had a patient ask me if I was an LPN or an RN. I know it was sort of inappropriate, but, I said "Does it make a difference to you?". I believe that when the commercials and advertisements stated "Get a REAL nurse", they neglected to state that Licensed Practical Nurses are nurses as well, and maybe it should have been stated that any LICENSED person that passed NCLEX-PN/RN IS, in fact, a NURSE.

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