How do experienced nurses do it to memorize everything? - page 2

by NursingBro 8,106 Views | 30 Comments

Tomorrow is my third day of orientation and I want to show them I can be a great nurse even though I am very new. How do you experienced nurses remember at what time all patients were sitting, out of bed, and all information... Read More


  1. 0
    It has been many many years since I worked in a hospital, but my "brain" always had a place to note things done as well as a place for things to do--like ambulate x2 or wound care, etc, so that I could tick off tasks when done. You will certainly develop your own system.
    Good luck!
  2. 0
    we use "brain sheets which must accompany us at all times . just a few words or key words like dem 0430 increased dopamine 0800 then you can fill in all the rest!
  3. 0
    I am learning so much on allnurses.com

    Can anyone fill this up with dummy info? I want to see what type of information experienced nurses would put.

    Room: 230
    Age: 57
    MD: Dr. Smith
    Dx:
    V/S:
    Wgt:
    I&O:
    Accu Check:
    Lab:
    Xray:
    Diet: Regular
    Activity:
    Weight Bearing:

    Precautions:
    Thigh & Calf:
    CPM:
    Bowel:
    Bladder:
  4. 0
    I carry a clipboard with me with my patients reports on them. I've devised my own reports sheets over the years and at the end column I have a little room for notes for my charting and the next shift report. I also have some cheatsheets on equipment, IV drips, chemo stuff, IV and epidural policies.
  5. 0
    God bless the Brain!!

    At the hospital I worked at, we used the kardex sheets that were printed each morning. I would add little notes such as pitting edema (pedal) greater right than left, heart murmur, etc.
    I also would tape a sticky note to the back of one of the laminted cards that were on my badge. We had a few plastic cards that would be attached to our badge that had things like what RACE means for fire safety, etc. I would tape the sticky on this then draw little graph lines across, one row for each patient. Columns were used for Q4hr vitals, blood sugars, special med times I wanted to remember, etc. I called this my "little brain", and it was great because it was always clipped to me. Once a doctor asked what a patient's last vitals were and I grabbed by badge and voila! there were the vitals. Very handy.
  6. 0
    some nurses just guesstimate, makes me wish i was a waiter so i can memorize everything I see/hear
  7. 0
    I had the same thought when I first started! Now with some experience under my belt, I can tell you the pt's most recent blood sugars, K and Mg, and vent settings at the drop of a hat. I also have my brains with me, I'm lost without them! Honestly, you get so used to what all the docs/APNs/RTs want to know over time that you just start memorizing those numbers. It'll come with time. Good luck!
  8. 0
    Quote from nurseysarah
    I had the same thought when I first started! Now with some experience under my belt, I can tell you the pt's most recent blood sugars, K and Mg, and vent settings at the drop of a hat. I also have my brains with me, I'm lost without them! Honestly, you get so used to what all the docs/APNs/RTs want to know over time that you just start memorizing those numbers. It'll come with time. Good luck!
    what is the most important info to know about each pt? info the docs need?
  9. 1
    Quote from NursingBro
    what is the most important info to know about each pt? info the docs need?
    That depends on the patient and their diagnosis.....and the abnormal labs.
    dudette10 likes this.
  10. 4
    I believe it all comes with experience, which isn't very helpful to new nurses, except that it is important to understand that no nurse started out knowing everything. We all come up with our own systems, reminders and ways of doing our jobs. You'll find yours, too!
    Dalzac, Hygiene Queen, NF_eyenurse, and 1 other like this.


Top