How do experienced nurses do it to memorize everything? - page 2

Tomorrow is my third day of orientation and I want to show them I can be a great nurse even though I am very new. How do you experienced nurses remember at what time all patients were sitting, out... Read More

  1. Visit  KarenJordan profile page
    0
    I carry a clipboard with me with my patients reports on them. I've devised my own reports sheets over the years and at the end column I have a little room for notes for my charting and the next shift report. I also have some cheatsheets on equipment, IV drips, chemo stuff, IV and epidural policies.
  2. Visit  NF_eyenurse profile page
    0
    God bless the Brain!!

    At the hospital I worked at, we used the kardex sheets that were printed each morning. I would add little notes such as pitting edema (pedal) greater right than left, heart murmur, etc.
    I also would tape a sticky note to the back of one of the laminted cards that were on my badge. We had a few plastic cards that would be attached to our badge that had things like what RACE means for fire safety, etc. I would tape the sticky on this then draw little graph lines across, one row for each patient. Columns were used for Q4hr vitals, blood sugars, special med times I wanted to remember, etc. I called this my "little brain", and it was great because it was always clipped to me. Once a doctor asked what a patient's last vitals were and I grabbed by badge and voila! there were the vitals. Very handy.
  3. Visit  Virtual profile page
    0
    some nurses just guesstimate, makes me wish i was a waiter so i can memorize everything I see/hear
  4. Visit  nurseysarah profile page
    0
    I had the same thought when I first started! Now with some experience under my belt, I can tell you the pt's most recent blood sugars, K and Mg, and vent settings at the drop of a hat. I also have my brains with me, I'm lost without them! Honestly, you get so used to what all the docs/APNs/RTs want to know over time that you just start memorizing those numbers. It'll come with time. Good luck!
  5. Visit  NursingBro profile page
    0
    Quote from nurseysarah
    I had the same thought when I first started! Now with some experience under my belt, I can tell you the pt's most recent blood sugars, K and Mg, and vent settings at the drop of a hat. I also have my brains with me, I'm lost without them! Honestly, you get so used to what all the docs/APNs/RTs want to know over time that you just start memorizing those numbers. It'll come with time. Good luck!
    what is the most important info to know about each pt? info the docs need?
  6. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    Quote from NursingBro
    what is the most important info to know about each pt? info the docs need?
    That depends on the patient and their diagnosis.....and the abnormal labs.
    dudette10 likes this.
  7. Visit  LindaBright profile page
    4
    I believe it all comes with experience, which isn't very helpful to new nurses, except that it is important to understand that no nurse started out knowing everything. We all come up with our own systems, reminders and ways of doing our jobs. You'll find yours, too!
    Dalzac, Hygiene Queen, NF_eyenurse, and 1 other like this.
  8. Visit  Paul'in'FL profile page
    0
    Quote from NursingBro
    I am learning so much on allnurses.com

    Can anyone fill this up with dummy info? I want to see what type of information experienced nurses would put.

    Room: 230
    Age: 57
    MD: Dr. Smith

    Dx: s/p open ex-lap

    V/S: q4
    Wgt: 10. k
    I&O: no
    Accu Check: no
    Lab: CBC q qm
    Xray: no
    Diet: Regular
    Activity: oob w assist
    Weight Bearing full:

    Precautions: confused after MN
    Thigh & Calf: ?
    CPM: n/a
    Bowel:Bladder: LBM yesterday, small formed
    voiding qs, offer urinal at nite r/t confusion
    Ortho floor, I gather!
  9. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    I write vitals, blood sugars, PRNs, dressing changes (as in): dsg 2000, adaptic, mepitel, Tyl ES X 2 1930. Short and sweet. I have many residents to remember, but I also don't want my "brain" cluttered.
  10. Visit  Do-over profile page
    0
    I take report on the census sheet listing my assignment - it already has name, DOB, MD, Dx and consults. I have a system for what info goes where in each section - diet, activity, code status, labs (abnormals only), assessment, etc.

    At the bottom (if there is at least an inch of blank space) I make 4 sections (or a however many patients I have, usu not more than 5)and label one with each bed. Here I note med and BS times, and can scratch charting reminders if I don't chart something in real time. I am trying VERY HARD to chart in real time - it slows me down in the morning, but I am always glad I did it by lunch time.

    My most important tool is my highlighter - I highlight things from report that I need to do or address during my shift (abnormal lab follow up, new IV, coumadin order, dressing change, which MD I need to chase down for another MD because-apparently-they-can't-call-each-other, etc)
  11. Visit  goodgrief profile page
    2
    I always find it most helpful to chart as I go, that way I don't have to worry about what I did 12 hrs ago, however, I only ever worked ICU with 2 pt max, so have never taken care of 6-8 pts in a single shift
    SoldierNurse22 and Aurora77 like this.
  12. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    It's about experience. In due time, a lot of it will become like second nature to you. There is NO rushing it. There is only learning well, one step at a time. What I liked was looking for information related to the kinds of patients I had had during a particular week. And this was in the days before Internet. I was in the hospital or university library learning what I could. I also had some good mentors. But there is just no replacement for experience + continued learning/(over) time. Rushing it is harmful. Start with the basics in terms of assessment and safety and the nursing process. It will come in time.
  13. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Also, there is a moderator on this site that has some great report and organizational sheets for new nurses. She's really nice, but I'm fried and I can't rember her name right now. I'll think of it.

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