Can anyone tell me the steps it takes to be an LVN?

  1. Where do you start? And what test are involved. Please remember I am a newby and this is my dream so PLEASE explain all the abbreviations if you use any... Thanks for all the help everyone!!!
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   Jules A
    Hi and welcome!
    I would check out your local community colleges for specific information. In my case I started taking the general education pre-req classes at the CC (community college :spin: ) and then applied for their LPN program. I had to take an LPN entrance exam and they considered that score as well as my gpa (grade point average) on the pre-reqs. There can be a lot of competition. We had around 400 applicants for 40 spots so do the very best you can on your classes even if it means taking only 1 or 2 at a time. My gen-ed classes took me 3 semesters and then the LPN program was 3 semesters. Best of luck to you!
    Jules
  4. by   mspriss154
    Thanks Jules, I think you got me headed in the right direction.:smilecoffeecup:
  5. by   msdobson
    Quote from mspriss154
    Where do you start? And what test are involved. Please remember I am a newby and this is my dream so PLEASE explain all the abbreviations if you use any... Thanks for all the help everyone!!!
    I assume classwork requirements vary from state to state. Here in California, you need to get some pre-requisite classes out of the way:

    (off the top of my head...someone fill in the blanks!)

    1. Anatomy/Physiology
    2. Human Development and Family
    3. Nutrition
    4. Psychology

    Also, you should have an intermediate level knowledge of math (fractions, decimals, etc.) and a "basic" understanding of chemistry.

    Any school you choose to attend will have all of the requirements for their program(s).

    Check around. Community colleges, private schools, Universities(?)

    Good Luck.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    I attended an expensive 12-month LVN program at a private vocational school in the Los Angeles area, so I did not need to take any prerequsite classes.

    1. The next LVN class started in October, so I applied in July.
    2. I took and passed a test that measured my skills in reading and basic math.
    3. I wrote an essay that measured my written composition skills.
    4. Since I qualified for a student loan that covered the entire amount of the tuition, I was accepted.
    5. I started in October 2004 and finished in October 2005.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    As others have stated, start looking into schools in your area. Most of them require some sort of entrance exam testing in basic skills such as reading, math (including algebra) and sometimes, science. If you are lacking in any of these areas, I strongly advise that you take some remedial classes or purchase a GED book and study it long and hard. It can be a very competitive process, so, again, as others said, take one or two classes at a time...do not overload yourself...and if you do choose to take two classes, make it an easy and a hard one...no two hard ones together. I'd take like anatomy and psychology, for example. But, I'll tell you, it is better to take one, and if you find that you aren't doing too well, drop the class before it is too late.
  8. by   msdobson
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It can be a very competitive process, so, again, as others said, take one or two classes at a time...do not overload yourself...and if you do choose to take two classes, make it an easy and a hard one...no two hard ones together. I'd take like anatomy and psychology, for example. But, I'll tell you, it is better to take one, and if you find that you aren't doing too well, drop the class before it is too late.
    Sage advice.
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from msdobson
    Sage advice.
    Yeah, it came from witnessing too much and knowing better. I remember a situation where many students competing for the RN program did that...took one course a semester to get a 4.0 GPA in their pre-requisites. Of course, they were accepted. At the RN student orientation, the instructors told them "Okay, we know what many of you did in order to get into the RN program...took one course at a time. Now, you'll have to take all of the nursing courses together. Let's see how you make it". That was a horrible statement to me...the school makes it so competitive that you had to backstab your own mother and sacrifice your children...what other option did people have but to create a strategy??? Heck...it worked...at least they had a shot.
  10. by   msdobson
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Yeah, it came from witnessing too much and knowing better. I remember a situation where many students competing for the RN program did that...took one course a semester to get a 4.0 GPA in their pre-requisites. Of course, they were accepted. At the RN student orientation, the instructors told them "Okay, we know what many of you did in order to get into the RN program...took one course at a time. Now, you'll have to take all of the nursing courses together. Let's see how you make it". That was a horrible statement to me...the school makes it so competitive that you had to backstab your own mother and sacrifice your children...what other option did people have but to create a strategy??? Heck...it worked...at least they had a shot.
    Yeah. Well, as I've said in many posts before, in my area, if you want into a "cheap" RN program (re: CC, etc.), you either have to get on the lottery train or ride out the (often years long) waiting lists. Either way, it's tough going. Otherwise, if you want to DO IT NOW, you pay the costs.
  11. by   mspriss154
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I attended an expensive 12-month LVN program at a private vocational school in the Los Angeles area, so I did not need to take any prerequsite classes.

    1. The next LVN class started in October, so I applied in July.
    2. I took and passed a test that measured my skills in reading and basic math.
    3. I wrote an essay that measured my written composition skills.
    4. Since I qualified for a student loan that covered the entire amount of the tuition, I was accepted.
    5. I started in October 2004 and finished in October 2005.
    Commuter, I am actually a fellow Texan too and live in the Plano area. Is there a difference btwn. financial aide and a student loan? B/c I think I may be able to qualify for full financial coverage such as yourself. Thank YOU!!
  12. by   jelorde37
    based on my knowledge, you can become an lvn through a community college or take the private school route. i went through the private school route due to the fact that theres no waiting list involved and it was a lot faster. but the fact that it was alot faster, it was alot harder. sooo good luck and i know whatever route you choose, youll succeed as long as you have the dream.
  13. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from mspriss154
    Commuter, I am actually a fellow Texan too and live in the Plano area. Is there a difference btwn. financial aide and a student loan? B/c I think I may be able to qualify for full financial coverage such as yourself. Thank YOU!!
    There's a difference between financial aid and student loans. Financial aid involves receiving grants of money that you do not need to repay; hence, these tend to be need-based. I earned too much money to qualify for grants, so I applied for a student loan with Sallie Mae and, due to my excellent credit scores, was approved.
  14. by   msdobson
    Quote from mspriss154
    Commuter, I am actually a fellow Texan too and live in the Plano area. Is there a difference btwn. financial aide and a student loan? B/c I think I may be able to qualify for full financial coverage such as yourself. Thank YOU!!

    "Financial Aid" is a term used to define ALL types of aid, from partial and full grants to student loans and scholarships.

    "Student Loans" are a "type" of aid, and are an agreement made by the student and a bank. Unlike a grant or scholarship, these must be paid back (with interest), usually within 10 or more years of graduation.

    Grants are fully funded by the Federal Government.

    Scholarships are funded by various organizations (alumni, businesses, religious groups, etc.)

    Neither grants nor scholarships must be paid back.

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