Are these true or false rumors about LPN - page 3

1. Is it true that they are almost completely phased out of hospitals 2. is it true that CNAs and medical assistants are going to do an LPNs job in the future 3. Is going to be an LPN even... Read More

  1. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from mcclot1993
    I thought LPNs were allowed to start IV as well. the only thing about the RN is they have to make care plans and teaching plans etc.
    It all depends on where you live and what the defined scope of practice is. Where I'm at an LPN can do practically everything an RN can - the only things only an RN can do are care plans, teaching plans, initial hospital assessment and admissions, case management, student nursing teaching, and nursing supervisory positions. Things considered skills related like starting IVs and administering IV meds, LPNs can do. But here like everywhere else, LPNs have been mostly phased out of hospitals. And it is somewhat harder to find a job. My advice is to do what I am doing - go ahead and get your LPN but stay in school and keep going until you get your BSN, and while you are doing that keep looking for an LPN opening to help give you that nursing experience while you are in school
  2. by   mcclot1993
    may I ask what are teaching plans, initial hospital assessment, case management.
  3. by   Tinkk
    1. In my area, there is a magnet hospital that still hires a multitude of LPNs yet. It just depends where you are geographically. Some other parts of the country are phasing them out (or so I hear).
    2. Unless CNAs and MAs get a higher nursing education, there is no way they could replace LPNs. Either way, you have to be a license nurse.
    3. It depends where you live geographically and what your goals are in life. I know a few middle-aged LPNs that are content with what they do and where they are at in life. If you want to go into more advanced or specialized settings or fields of nursing, your best bet is to go with your RN right away. LPNs are kind of limited where they can go, so I would consider that a drawback. Also, the pay is half of an RN's. Just saying.
    4. I think you might have a harder time finding a job as an LPN than you would as an RN. But again, this totally depends on geographical setting. You would have an easier time being hired at a nursing home or clinic than you would in other settings. If you do not want to work in LTC, I would stay away from LPN.
  4. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from mcclot1993
    may I ask what are teaching plans, initial hospital assessment, case management.
    Teaching plans are created by determining what a patient needs to know for their continuing care and their ability to learn.The RN makes the call as far as what the patient needs to be taught and how. When a patient is first admitted to the hospital, for example in the ER, an RN must do a complete physical assessment, and an LOC assessment. this is then documented in the patients chart. Many case managers in the hospital where I work are RNs. They help coordinate care for the patient and work with social workers and people from various departments and disciplines.
  5. by   DoGoodThenGo
  6. by   Iheartnursing
    In Maine you are unlikely to find a job as an LPN in a hospital. However there is great employment opportunity. Working in LTC is more rewarding and educational then one may think, Skilled nursing units have more med surg than many hospitals do as no one stays in the hospital for long anymore. Many people are discharged to skilled rehab facilities and YES they do hire LPN's where you will start peri IVs, administered meds through PICC lines, wound care, wound vacs the list goes on and one.... You can also work in many home health settings, as well as teach medical assistants and LPN students (with some other extra background)! Also clinics that are run by those very hospitals that only hire RN's.... I work for a local hospital (just not IN the hospital) and my career opportunities there are boundless! That being said I am pursuing my RN and then BSN for both money and opportunities but YES being an LPN is GREAT! I think that all RN's should go this route first!
  7. by   RInursingstudent
    Many new LPN's in CT are working as CNA's. Save your money, get the RN.
  8. by   sueall
    In hospital daytime clinical work, the current LVN and CMA job descriptions can be identical. These job descriptions were taken directly from job opportunities currently available through Texas Children's Hospital in Houston:

    LVN:
    Overview:
    Gather information, assess and provide direct care to patients.


    Responsibilities:
    Assist in the collection of patient/family data (biophysical, psychosocial, developmental, cultural and environmental); collect and document vital signs, height/weight and reason for visit; graph data; document current medications, allergies and other information. Prepare patient for examination; assist provider during treatments, exams and testing; complete treatments/lab; document interventions; call in prescription refills; take messages and return calls from parents; keep rooms stocked with supplies. Administer medication. Assist with patient/family education. Coordinate referrals. Triage patients.


    Knowledge and Skills:
    Fundamental knowledge of pediatric assessment and treatment required. Knowledge of related OSHA, CLIA and Joint Commission guidelines and requirements, general office tasks, confidentiality and filing system also required. The ability to use thermometer, scales, sphygmomanometer/stethoscope, scalp vein needles, hearing/vision screening equipment, pulse oximetry, typanometer and basic laboratory (microscope, centrifuge, hematology analyzer and specimen collection) required. Proficiency with treatments such as nebulizer, ear irrigation and dressing changes required. Familiar with all business office machines (computer, multi-line telephone, copier and fax machines).




    CMA:
    Overview:
    Gather information, assess and provide direct care to patients.


    Responsibilities:
    Assist in the collection of patient/family data (biophysical, psychosocial, developmental, cultural, environmental, etc.); collect and document vital signs, BMI, height/weight and reason for visit; graph data; document current medications, allergies and other information. Prepare patient for examination; assist provider during treatments, examinations and testing; complete treatments as directed; document interventions; call in prescription refills; take messages and return calls from parents; assist in providing office emergency patient care; maintain current CPR certifications; keep rooms stocked with supplies. Administer and document medications and immunizations; report medication and immunization errors; document adverse reactions to medications; maintain integrity of medication supplies. Assist with patient and family education. Coordinate referrals. Collect specimens and perform laboratory tests.


    Knowledge and Skills:
    Fundamental knowledge of pediatric assessment and treatment required. Knowledge of related OSHA, CLIA and JCAHO guidelines and requirements, general office tasks, confidentiality and filing system required. The ability to use a thermometer, scales, sphygmomanometer/stethoscope, butterfly needles, hearing/vision screening equipment, pulse oximetry, typanometer, basic laboratory equipment (microscope, centrifuge, hematology analyzer) and specimen collection. Proficient with treatments such as nebulizer, ear irrigation and dressing changes. Familiar with all business office machines (computer, multiline telephone, copier and fax machines).


    There are differences for LVN after-hour or telephone triage positions, but the general clinical worker job duties are exactly the same. At present, the LVNs are one paygrade above CMAs. I can't see it remaining that way, if the job responsibilities are the same.

    And yes, there are more CMA job opportunities listed than LVN job opportunities.

    Just food for thought.
  9. by   nursemae86
    I live in between DC and Richmond, VA This is what I have found:

    1. Most major hospitals have phased out LPNs, because of MAGNET Status hospitals are striving to get.
    2. As nothing is certain for the future, but for now, I don't see CNAs and CMAs taking over LPN jobs.
    3. I think that no matter what nursing degree you have, you will always be encouraged to continue to nursing education, so to say just to stay as an LPN, may not give you as many opportunities if you would further your education.
    4. In my area there are plenty of LPN positions available, from home health, Dr. offices to nursing homes. I have not had a problem finding as position since being an LPN. That said if you limit yourself to only being available one shift it may be harder to find a position.
  10. by   pinkiepinkPN
    Quote from ixchel
    My local hospital just fired all of the LPNs. It's the only hospital here. The LPNs can find work in LTC, usually, and I think home health. It's possible to get a job, but hard. Makes me glad I skipped LPN and went straight for RN. Can't imagine graduating and getting licensed, only to be limited to basically geriatrics.
    All area hospitals here employ LPNs, and they're abundant in the local VA hospital which is enormous.

    Also, geriatrics is my chosen specialty. I would never classify it as a limitation.
  11. by   MOLpN04
    When I was in HS looking to do an LPN program, I was told by all the guidance counselors "bad choice, that program and LPN's are going to "obsolete" in the near future. That was back in 1987. Today I am an LPN, and have worked in the hospital on med surg unit, in LTC, and in Home Health as well. Many LPN's are employed in clinics also in my area, and at the VA hospitals as well.
  12. by   crs1965
    I have found that it is very difficult to get a hospital positiion as LPN. Most of them want MAs. LPNs usually work home health, clinic, or LTC, in my area. I am considering bridging to ADN so I can do something other than these options.
  13. by   sherriehuntress
    I work in small town hospital in Oklahoma on Med Surg floor and Im LPN. The major big hospitals have done away with LPN/LVNs but in smaller community its alot harder to find RNs to staff hospitals so they use LPNs especially in Med Surg and evan in OR use LPN as scrub techs also use LPNs Dr offices LTC facilty and home health. Their are jobs out there just got to find them.

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