doctors vs nurses - page 3

anyone here feel like half their time is spent trying to get the doctors to their own jobs????????????:angryfire... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from muffie
    i have a saying, but have never said it to a doc

    "i am not your wife, secretary, concubine, mistress or girlfriend"
    would just love to say it, someday

    something that just burns my tailfeathers is when doc a wants you to tell something to doc b
    hello ?????? this is a phone, you talk into it, person on other end hears you ??!!??

    oh well
    [font="comic sans ms"]i hear you! especially when dr. a wants you to tell dr. b something he doesn't have the guts to tell him himself. (why is it almost always "hims" in these situations?) "tell that idiot, dr. cards that his milrinone is killing my patient!"

    "you tell that a$$hole that this patient doesn't need surgery, and if he wants to pay for his new lexus, he should _____________________"

    "here, ruby! you show this idiot (anesthesiologist) how do do a cardiac output!"

    as for your first line, it's wonderful! i fantasized for years about saying something similar, and when i actually did say it, i was so angry it just slipped out, and i didn't even notice it! but my former coworkers are probably still laughing about that one!

  2. by   XB9S
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    Have to agree here, walking stick coming out, before I left secondary care and began working in primary care I found the doctors more approachable than in the 1980's when you had to hide on ward rounds and eat breakfast in the toilet In some ways things have improved and thankfully that is one of them. Sorry you are having problems with your doctors
    Breakfast in the toilet, I had forgotten that one. Infection control would have a fit at that now.

    Also remember the charge nurses and sisters having a cigarette in the toilets, with the deputy matron I seem to remember.

    Now that was someone the doctors wouldn't mess with even back then - Matron knew everyone by name and even the consultants were scared of her.
  3. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from XB9S
    Breakfast in the toilet, I had forgotten that one. Infection control would have a fit at that now.

    Also remember the charge nurses and sisters having a cigarette in the toilets, with the deputy matron I seem to remember.

    Now that was someone the doctors wouldn't mess with even back then - Matron knew everyone by name and even the consultants were scared of her.
    trained staff had their cigarettes on the ward but all other staff had to leave the ward or go to the toilet if they wanted a cigarette.

    let see what else I remember

    consultant on the ward everyone had to hide except the sister or senior staff nurse. Never sit on the bed and talk to patients, everything removed from lockers tops, all beds in line and linen topped and tailed when changed, strictly 2 visitors to a bed and strict visiting times. With plenty of students on the wards all patients assisted as necessary with feeding
  4. by   RGN1
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    trained staff had their cigarettes on the ward but all other staff had to leave the ward or go to the toilet if they wanted a cigarette.

    let see what else I remember

    consultant on the ward everyone had to hide except the sister or senior staff nurse. Never sit on the bed and talk to patients, everything removed from lockers tops, all beds in line and linen topped and tailed when changed, strictly 2 visitors to a bed and strict visiting times. With plenty of students on the wards all patients assisted as necessary with feeding
    AAWWWW you're getting me all nostalgic!!!

    Next it'll be the bed pan rounds after meals (all those pans stacked on a trolley!!!), the "J-cloth" uniforms, the silly hats (not sad to have seen them go), the glass, mercury filled thermometers & the metal mercury sphygmammometers that you carried to each bed to manually do the BP's. I wonder if I'd still bne wanting to leave the country if it was still like this??............Ok I probably would because the weather etc was still the same!!
  5. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from RGN1
    AAWWWW you're getting me all nostalgic!!!

    Next it'll be the bed pan rounds after meals (all those pans stacked on a trolley!!!), the "J-cloth" uniforms, the silly hats (not sad to have seen them go), the glass, mercury filled thermometers & the metal mercury sphygmammometers that you carried to each bed to manually do the BP's. I wonder if I'd still bne wanting to leave the country if it was still like this??............Ok I probably would because the weather etc was still the same!!
    think we have hi jacked this thread, think will start another one just to be nostalgic
  6. by   RGN1
    Another thread hijacked on the "nostalgia" theme!!?? How many's that now do you reckon??
  7. by   sara20
    Oh Lord, is this really how nursing used to be? Well, then by your measures us recent graduates should be thankful with what we have to deal with I guess...I just don't see why we spend 4 years of our lives studying and getting all this education when there are the so called doctors who think only they know better than the rest of the staff.
  8. by   XB9S
    Sara, it wasn't all bad, you knew that you would be well staffed and because students were actually included in you staffing numbers were given much more responsibility therefore learnt clinical skills much quicker. I was placing nasogastric tubes as a second your student and now many of the qualified nurses I work with have never done this.

    You knew that you weren't going to be made redundent and they were actually building new hospitals. and you quite often had empty beds.

    There was a certain respect that I feel sometimes seem to be missing today and although the junior doctors could be really horrid to you the senior medics did value the senior nurses and listened to what they had to say.

    Now I am not defending the doctors that you have experienced and a lack of respect and treating nurses like scivvies in inescusable and must not be tolerated but when you say you have been to college for 4 year to get all this education and the so called doctors think the know better just bear in mind that they have been to college for 5 year and may not have the clinical skills or attitudes developed yet but the do come out with alot of knowledge that they just need to learn to put into practice.

    Please don't take this as a critisim because it is not, as I said there is no excuse for a lack of respect but please don't lose all faith there are some really good doctors out there who do really value the nursing staff.
  9. by   sara20
    XB9S, not at all I am not offended by your comment, in fact I think if that was the situation back in the old days then that seemed like the best time for nursing students. Because I like a lot of other recent graduates weren't allowed to perform NG insertion and IV insertion prior to graduating from nursing school. Reason given is that these skills are advanced and require futher practice and skill knowledge, blah blah blah...Not that I think they are hard to perform but our university didn't want to be held accountable if anything went wrong. Also, I would like to clarify that it is not that I have had bad experiences with doctors & I am here writing about it. Actually, I have met some good doctors and some bad ones, and some lost medical students who ask nurses for help. But I have witnessed situations weren't making wise decisions and refused to listen to the nurses thinking they know better, the so called "patriarchal role". Now that's a shame even though they encourage us in nursing schools to think about interdisciplinary team care models which really you can't always utilize in practice. I just think us nurses deserve better respect, and that one or even two years of extra time spent in medical school studying the details of conditions and the human body doesn't make him/her more knowledgeable about their patients. We nurses spend more time with the patient, heck 12 hours/shift if you are a full time nurse. I think these 12 hours are more sufficient for me to get a better picture of my patient than any general medical textbook can teach me

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