Have you ever cried when a Pt died - page 2

Sorry if there is a thread somewhere on here already about this. I remember the first time one of my patients died on me. I was taking care of her and she got very sick, I was working in Assisted... Read More

  1. Visit  wellsjc profile page
    2
    I've been nursing for 25 years in all kinds of settings and my motto is still " when you quit crying when you lose a patient, you need to find a new job". I have always found that my patients' families were some how comforted in seeing that the nurse who cared for their relative or friend cared enough about them to care about their passing. So go ahead and cry, it lets off the anxiety and makes you a better nurse.
    Topaz7 and Esme12 like this.
  2. Visit  Merlyn profile page
    1
    Not ever at the hospital but in the car coming home.
    GinaDecorRN likes this.
  3. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    0
    Yes, when I was a student and it was the first time I had gone through anything like that. I didn't know the patient for longer than the one shift to which I was assigned--and she died during. But the family brought out the emotion in me, so there it was.

    After that, I have had many patients who died during my time with them, and no, I did not cry. I felt sorrow many times, but actual tears...no. I just learned how to keep my emotions in check, because I figured if I let myself get torn up every time a patient I cared about died, well....I'd spend alot of time in tears. I was not without feeling for them, but I had other patients (always) when I had someone who had passed, and as charge nurse many more than that who I knew would likely need me on top of my game instead of weeping at the desk.

    So while the short answer is 'yes', the more realistic answer is 'yes, once, but not again'.
  4. Visit  gallllatea profile page
    0
    no, but hasn't happened that often. I was more preoccupied with doing my job, not being emotionally wrecked.
  5. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    Quote from wellsjc
    I've been nursing for 25 years in all kinds of settings and my motto is still " when you quit crying when you lose a patient, you need to find a new job". I have always found that my patients' families were some how comforted in seeing that the nurse who cared for their relative or friend cared enough about them to care about their passing. So go ahead and cry, it lets off the anxiety and makes you a better nurse.
    I have shed a few tears over the years. I agree that the family somehow feels comforted that the one who cared for their loved one genuinely cared for them personally. I save for my soul cleansing cry for the car.....but those slow escaping water drops that creep down your cheeks, as you mouth the words.........I'm so sorry, I think let the family know how deeply personal you take your job.

    I also agree if you ever stop feeling it's time to leave.
    Silverlight2010 likes this.
  6. Visit  drew1106 profile page
    0
    yes, i am working in an assisted living facility right now and you do bond with them. its normal to cry.
  7. Visit  xoemmylouox profile page
    0
    We had a patient die recently that we all loved. We went to his funeral. I don't cry for all of my lost patients, but I have made a special bond with some. The last patient was the sadest yet.. It is worse when it doesn't seem fair or if you feel like you could have done something.
  8. Visit  wilsonbl5150 profile page
    0
    Absolutely, I've done Acute and LTC and lost patients with both. LTC deaths were hard because I had worked with the patients for so long that I felt I really knew them. In Acute I cried because I lost a 3 year old little girl. I had helped work on her for an hour before she was called. It was later, after everything had settled down that the tears came.
  9. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    0
    when i use to work directly with patients, every time i saw a mother losing a young child my eyes would swell up, however, i don't cry unless is a pt. that i been taking care of for a while and gotten familiar with their family as well. however, several times i have gone to my office and behind doors i have cried like a baby, the last time was when one of our nurses lost her battle with cancer that affected me deeply, since she was my preceptor long time ago may she r.i.p.
  10. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    1
    Yes I've started to but I just gently press on my lacrimal glands and hold it in. Why? Because it's not happening to me. My job is to the the calm in the storm. It's not my experience to have.
    GrnTea likes this.
  11. Visit  Fearless_leader profile page
    0
    I have & I know I will again it's human nature.
  12. Visit  MomRN0913 profile page
    0
    I sure have. When I worked ICU and now in hospice. And I have questioned myself on what I could have done differently.

    All normal.

    I am new ot hospice and home health. i was talking to my preceptor about how I take my work home and feel 24/7 responsible for my patients. I had one patient who I set up a nebulizer for the first time. Iw orked in ICU, but the RT's always did it. I was scared I did it wrong. My preceptor said " if she dies, it's not the nebulizer that would kill her, it's the cancer" And she is right. She told me about one time when she gave morphine and the patient died hours later. But the patient was in distress. It wasn't the morphine that killed the patient, it was the disease.

    Crying and caring just makes you human.
  13. Visit  MattNurse profile page
    1
    Quote from wellsjc
    I've been nursing for 25 years in all kinds of settings and my motto is still " when you quit crying when you lose a patient, you need to find a new job". I have always found that my patients' families were some how comforted in seeing that the nurse who cared for their relative or friend cared enough about them to care about their passing. So go ahead and cry, it lets off the anxiety and makes you a better nurse.
    I respectfully disagree. I don't cry and I am an excellent nurse. I have never, and I doubt that I ever would cry when a patient dies. It isn't my personality. I have other ways of dealing with anxiety and it doesn't make a nurse that cries a better nurse. I am guessing you are talking in general terms, but most men I know in nursing would probably feel similar to myself.
    Always_Learning likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close