Most Important issue facing today's aging

  1. I'm looking for input on a topic for a class project with an emphasis on avocacy. Suggestions?
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Blee O'Myacin
    As opposed to being 99 and intubated in the field, brought to the ICU to spend your last days on a vent, sedated and being turned every two hours because your heart had the nerve to stop beating!

    Seriously. I think we do a huge disservice to our elders by not letting them go when it is their time. There is no reason in the world why the above mentioned person should be a full code. I've had elderly patients who have said "I just want to go when its my time" and their children will swear up and down that "Mom just isn't with it anymore, she's still a full code".

    I'm not saying that we shouldn't give good healthcare to our aging population. I think we should be supportive of health maintenance act appropriately when it is time to let go.

    Blee


    Quote from MarLynn
    I'm looking for input on a topic for a class project with an emphasis on avocacy. Suggestions?
  4. by   txspadequeenRN
    What drives me crazy is when the families agree to have Mom on hospice but refuse to sign a DNR, thinking that mom will come out of it....



    Quote from Blee O'Myacin
    As opposed to being 99 and intubated in the field, brought to the ICU to spend your last days on a vent, sedated and being turned every two hours because your heart had the nerve to stop beating!

    Seriously. I think we do a huge disservice to our elders by not letting them go when it is their time. There is no reason in the world why the above mentioned person should be a full code. I've had elderly patients who have said "I just want to go when its my time" and their children will swear up and down that "Mom just isn't with it anymore, she's still a full code".

    I'm not saying that we shouldn't give good healthcare to our aging population. I think we should be supportive of health maintenance act appropriately when it is time to let go.

    Blee
  5. by   ebony2
    Blee, I thinkyou are right and the only reason that Full code be designated for that particular scenario is if the patient wants it that way. I think as nurses advocating for our patients rights we need to do more to prioritize gettig thid infowhen patients are capable in making their wishes known. In MD offices, inpatient stays, when entering a SNF thiw discssion needs to happen. There are many things alredy in place but if they are not consistently utilized what good are they. It gets even more convoluted when you add spouses, kids, HCPOA's and guardians making these very difficult decisions. Cut out the middle men like guilt and second guessing(am I doing the right thing). We could be ready for the end of life situation rather it be sudden or unexpected with just a little more foot work up front (throughout the entire health care system). Dying with dignity and having the person's wishes carried out I think would become the norm and "keeping people alive " if it works for them or not woud not be as common as it is.
  6. by   Dixiecup
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    What drives me crazy is when the families agree to have Mom on hospice but refuse to sign a DNR, thinking that mom will come out of it....

    Where I live it is a requirement they have to sign the DNR or they can't get hospice.
  7. by   marjoriemac
    I think there is a big issue in people who are unable to communicate at all having advocates work on their behalf. I have seen it so often, it's easy for Mrs X to complain about this and that or Mr Y's family to complain after hearing him say this and that, but what about those who have no voice, and who have no family to look out for them. In too many homes these folk are left lying in their room with little visitation or heed to comfort.
  8. by   txspadequeenRN
    Well I wish it was here. It makes no sense whatsoever. It just comes down to family denial......


    Quote from Dixiecup
    Where I live it is a requirement they have to sign the DNR or they can't get hospice.
  9. by   NRSKarenRN
    pbs stations airing a special frontline show tuesday nov 21st, 9pm

    living old
    nov. 21, 2006 at 9pm

    [s]those over 85 are the fastest growing segment of the u.s. population. medical advances have enabled an unprecedented number of americans to live longer, healthier lives, but millions suffer from chronic illness and protracted physical decline. yet the number of available caregivers is dwindling. with families more dispersed than ever and a healthcare system overburdened, many experts fear that we are on the threshold of a major crisis. (more )[/s]

    [banana]
    the full program made available for viewing online in quicktime and windows media;
    extended interviews with geriatricians, a nurse, a general practitioner, a bioethicist and elderly people and family members on the hopes and challenges of aging;

    profiles of individuals and families featured in the program and the physical and emotional burdens they've experienced over the years -- even decades;

    an interactive map featuring the demographics of america's elderly; the comparative costs of nursing homes, assisted living and home care;
    where to go: links to nationally recognized organizations dealing with issues facing seniors, including aging and end-of-life care, plus the basics on medicare/medicaid;

    facts and stats offering an overview of aging issues in the u.s. and the world, including the shortage of geriatricians, the growing need for home health aides, and more;

    special readings and interviews on how faith affects attitudes on medical intervention, family obligations and death; the changes and reforms ahead for nursing homes; an introduction to the palliative care movement with more on the challenges of treating multiple chronic conditions; and an overview of societal and workplace reforms being proposed to help family members caring for their elderly relatives.


    [/banana]

    should give you tons of advocacy ideas.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Nov 20, '06
  10. by   UM Review RN
    What infuriates me is the patient who has a Living Will and DNR in place, which is promptly rescinded by the family upon the patient's inability to continue to verbalize what should be a (pardon the pun) dead issue.
  11. by   UKRNinUSA
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    YES , I could have wrote this myself. After many years of dealing with Alzheimers and Hospice.....Seen it way to many times....

    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    What infuriates me is the patient who has a Living Will and DNR in place, which is promptly rescinded by the family upon the patient's inability to continue to verbalize what should be a (pardon the pun) dead issue.
  13. by   jetscreamer101
    I think sometimes families think we "can bring them back" usually. Some just don't understand what happens in a full code situation.

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