Why many new grads don't find jobs.... - page 7

While eating breakfast at a local diner in my scrubs, my waitress was excited to share the news that she, "finished my CNA clinicals yesterday!!" "Great! How was it?" I asked. She starts nursing... Read More

  1. Visit  Hygiene Queen profile page
    0
    Quote from canadiandude
    You nailed it. Absolutely agree. With BSN from good uni its the clinical references that count. If I wanted to do CNAs work I wouldnt have applied to BSN program
    Don't you have to do "CNA work" in your clinical?
    The "CNA's work" is your work.
    I don't know, but I wonder if you haven't already been slapped in a bun with a side of fries, because with an attitude like that, somebody's going to chew you up.
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  3. Visit  mgp6 profile page
    1
    It is definitely helpful to get some experience outside of clinicals while in nursing school. I did a summer nursing internship at a camp facility for kids and adults w/ physical and developmental disabilities and I also worked as a nurse extern on a medsurg unit at a local hospital for more than a year. This nurse externship program was very competitive. I did not know anyone at the hospital, so I believe that my GPA, summer internship, letters of recommendation from my clinical instructors, and my performance during the job interview helped me land the job.

    I just graduated last week with my BSN and got offered a job a few days before my graduation at a magnet hospital where I did not have any connections. I believe that my experiences and my GPA helped a lot to make me stand out among other applicants. I also did almost 200 hours of senior preceptorship in the ICU, participated at a leadership program, volunteered for medical reserve corps, and obtained ACLS certification. Having great letters of recommendation from your instructors, preceptor, supervisors also greatly add to your chances of getting a job.
    Irinauer likes this.
  4. Visit  loveoutloud profile page
    0
    There is a huge overflow of CNA's where I live and I am unable to get a job. I really hope all my volunteer experiance in LTC will help me get a job when I graduate1
  5. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    I became certified as a Nursing Assistant the month after I graduated from high school. I was 17 and proud. The same day I turned 18, later that fall, I started my first day of paid orientation as a CNA in the float pool at my local hospital! I was even more proud and making money! I have worked there since and am just starting my 3rd semester if nursing school. I have benefitted do much from working as a CNA a year before Nursing school. I learned so much! Since starting nursing school this past fall (2011) I still work when I can which is about 15 hours a week normally. It keeps me reminded of the need to be humble and to be a team playing nurse. I am 19 now and don't regret it and have an offer from my current manager for employment.

    My future employment is, of course, dependent on availability and my continued satisfactory performance at work. My school actually does the majority if our clnicals at the hospital I work at. I had a smoother clinical transition than some of my fellow students because I was familiar with the setting and how charting and etc worked. There are 5 people in my nursing class that are employed by this same hospital. Since we're in the float pool, PRN, we make our own schedule day by day and hour by hour, no that's hitting the CNA lottery! Networking is def a benefit! My department director actually wrote one of my LOR's to get into nursing school.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on May 28, '12
  6. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    I was given the same advice by my mentor and DON. I asked about taking the CNA course during the summer before nursing school started and she told me NO! For many of the same reasons you mentioned. Also, she told me to spend the summer with my family because the next two years would be tough to negotiate with a family and a 70 mile drive. We learn CNA skills - patient care skills - the first semester. So I'm not paying $1000 for a CNA course. And I am a huge fan of and advocate for the CNA's and HHA's I work with. Being a team player comes from your own value system and not necessarily being a CNA first.I have no problem if people want to be a CNA first and won't discount that it helps some folks. But you do not have to do it to be a good nurse. I think the woman in the OP's first post makes a good point - she realizes what she wants to do and is going to do it. Many of the folks I graduated with went on to go almost straight into NICU or ER or surgery centers without being a CNA first. In fact, surgery centers are great for family life - no holidays or weekend and usually more of a 9-5 schedule.
    In my program CNA is required before entry Into the program. Niw that means you myst be listed by the first day of class, you dint have ro have ant clinical hours. I attend an ADN program. I took my CNA class during HS and difnt gave to pay for it, except the testing fees for the state exam. After our first year we can list as CNA-II (NC) which allows us to do procedures involving sterile technique etc..... Start foley catheters and do wound care and dressings OB wounds over 48 hours old. After our professional managemet and delegation class class in our fourth semester our school actually helps students find PRN work at local hospitals as a way to help them network and use some if the skills we are learning. I don't think not being a CNA before or during school or working as one means you won't be a good nurse, buy I do feel that it can only make you a better one by Being one, if you let it work for you that way, at least.
  7. Visit  ImKosher profile page
    1
    Canadiandude, like others said, your going to reap what you sow with that mentality of yours. Here in NC, it's required to go through the CNA program so you understand the foundation of patient care. This is a popular method being picked up by many states.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  8. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    During clinical at my nursing program, ee're not allowed to use the facilities CNA's, as far as asking them to get vitals, i&o's, etc.... We can ask them to help us turn pt or HELP slide them up in bed. Our school I'd adamant on teaching us to do total care, when possible. We have only had the max of 2 pt. dying 1st year. I like that they are training us not to rely on having to have an assistant, but also knowing when to ask for help. I learned a lot about time management from doing my rounds and getting vitals on pt. while at work as a CNA. I want to became ICU nurse one day, and ICU nurses here don't have CNA's. They gave 2-3 patients and they are to provide total care for them.
  9. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    2
    CanadianDude

    A CNAs job is your job. You are not going to be employed for long if you sit around waiting for CNAs to do the "dirty work.". For one thing, you have to do what needs to be done if no one is available. YOU are responsible for your patient's needs. A CNA merely lightens the task load.

    Second of all, CNAs are going to make themselves scarce far more often if you have a terrible attitude, I promise you.
    amoLucia and Hygiene Queen like this.
  10. Visit  not.done.yet profile page
    0
    Quote from Stephalump
    CanadianDude

    A CNAs job is your job. You are not going to be employed for long if you sit around waiting for CNAs to do the "dirty work.". For one thing, you have to do what needs to be done if no one is available. YOU are responsible for your patient's needs. A CNA merely lightens the task load.

    Second of all, CNAs are going to make themselves scarce far more often if you have a terrible attitude, I promise you.
    This is absolutely true. I work nights. Any time we need a sitter we are short a CNA. That means one CNA for 36 beds. It really isn't hard to do the math. That CNA can't possibly get to everyone. Therefore unless I have no choice, I do the duties I technically could delegate to the CNA all by myself. The patient should not have to sit in their own mess, degrading skin that is likely already degraded or vulnerable, because I am too proud or too pansy-stomached to deal with it. Not to mention advocating for pride and human dignity by getting them cleaned up quickly and efficiently.

    As the nurse, you will be responsible for everything you delegate to the CNA. If he or she doesn't get it done, he or she may indeed get in trouble, but guess what. So does the nurse who was supposed to make sure it got done. Meaning...do it themselves.
  11. Visit  valgraves profile page
    0
    I havent graduated yet, but I can think of a few reasons....mainly the nurse who may have been there a while complains alot, is lazy, and has a bad attitude. I worked as a store manager in retail for years....and i would absolutely hire someone just out of college with a can do attitude over a ****** nurse who thinks she deserves the world.
  12. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    0
    Quote from valgraves
    I havent graduated yet, but I can think of a few reasons....mainly the nurse who may have been there a while complains alot, is lazy, and has a bad attitude. I worked as a store manager in retail for years....and i would absolutely hire someone just out of college with a can do attitude over a ****** nurse who thinks she deserves the world.
    Really?

    Sigh. Did you consider for a second that when I encouraged nursing students to get experience in healthcare that I might also discourage them from being lazy, thinking they deserve the world, complaining, having a bad attitude, and being a "****** nurse"??

  13. Visit  TAWBSNRN profile page
    1
    I sure wish I could agree with this post, except...
    I have over 15 years of CNA experience in various healthcare settings. I have excellent employment references. I just graduated from a BSN program this May with honors. I have applied to almost every health care facility in MD and DE. I have not even been offered an interview, let alone a job. However, many of my classmates (with no experience whatsoever!) have already secured positions. And they haven't even taken their NCLEX exam yet!
    I am discouraged to say the least. It's actually quite depressing...
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  14. Visit  ArrowRN profile page
    0
    Quote from TAWBSNRN
    I sure wish I could agree with this post, except...
    I have over 15 years of CNA experience in various healthcare settings. I have excellent employment references. I just graduated from a BSN program this May with honors. I have applied to almost every health care facility in MD and DE. I have not even been offered an interview, let alone a job. However, many of my classmates (with no experience whatsoever!) have already secured positions. And they haven't even taken their NCLEX exam yet!
    I am discouraged to say the least. It's actually quite depressing...
    not related to nursing but I know many other employers who prefer people on the flip side with zero experience, that way they can "groom" the employees and train them into their own culture...its often harder to retrain and get someone to change their ways. I am surprised more new nurses are not getting jobs. Its just the times we in for now.


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