For students that are undecided between RN/PA - page 6

I wanted to let anyone that is considering PA vs NP or RN know that I have experienced a semester of nursing classes, and found that the curicculum did not match my expectations nor seem appropriate... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    peeps, luv ya, but how can you say no one wants to discuss disatisfaction with nursing!!! LOL! Most of this bb is filled with venting!
  2. by   meandragonbrett
    Peeps,
    No, I don't want to imput on the topic, but I will say something about your posts. They do have an arrogant tone to them. One of "I'm better than you all because you are all nurses and they are nothing" That's just the vibe I get from you. I think it was fab4fan who mentioned www.studentdoctor.net and I agree that you should post over there. But that's my opinion and I can have my opinion.

    Brett
  3. by   Nurse Izzy
    Originally posted by Peeps Mcarthur
    Hey,
    Anybody know of a state where NPs are independent?
    Peeps,
    I used to live in South Carolina where NPs are independent - to the extent they also have prescribing capabilities. I now live in Alabama and the laws are changing - the last I knew NPs could not write scripts but have since heard that that is changing - haven't researched it so can't say for sure. Do know that in both SC and AL NPs can open their own practice, separate from MDs.

    Elizabeth
  4. by   Nurse Izzy
    Originally posted by meandragonbrett
    Peeps,
    No, I don't want to imput on the topic, but I will say something about your posts. They do have an arrogant tone to them. One of "I'm better than you all because you are all nurses and they are nothing" That's just the vibe I get from you. I think it was fab4fan who mentioned www.studentdoctor.net and I agree that you should post over there. But that's my opinion and I can have my opinion.

    Brett
    Brett,
    I have to agree with you. Peeps does seem quite arrogant. I can't quite figure out if it's an "I'm better than you" attitude or if it's fear or jealousy that we've found our niche and he lacks that confidence thus far.

    Peeps - you should go on to medical school because you seem to have that perception that you only want to diagnose/treat and not have anything to do with the actual person. That is exactly the reason I opted out of medical school - the lack of hands on caring and time spent with the patient. You do have the God complex. Just my honest opinion, for whatever it's worth.

    Elizabeth
  5. by   Bonnie Blue
    Just had to put in my two cents. I have a master's in exercise physiology. I did cardiac rehab and related things for a few years. I felt stuck and explored my options. I thought about med school but realized that I didn't have the time needed to prepare for the MCAT. I also wanted a life.

    I considered PA school next. But I decided not to go that route for two reasons. One, my chances of getting into a PA program were slim. Competition for admission is steep. Most applicants have a least one year or more of hands on health care experience. Paramedics seem to get in quite a bit. At that point in my life I wanted to go somewhere, not bang my head against a wall trying to get accepted. Two, I heard about the Bridge NP program at Vanderbilt from someone who went through it. I did some research and realized the acute care track was just what I wanted.

    The bridge year of core nursing classes was a pain but I did learn patho and pharm. I spent my last 3 weeks of clinical working in a trauma unit.

    My specialty year has been much harder. I had medical physiology, patho, and pharm. These classes had a lot of science content. In fact some CRNA candidates were in my medical phys class.

    I feel that I have made the right choice for me. I will have a license which allow me to get a job practicaly anywhere. Being able to feed myself and keep a roof over my head is important to me. I love the fact that I will be in the front lines taking care of people. I always wanted to help people and make my corner of the world better. Nursing gives that chance. As an NP, I will be able counsel patients, monitor their progress and help them reach their goal of quality of life amoung other things like writing orders and pulling chest tubes. ;-)

    Peeps, go for PA but from what I have read, research might really be more your thing. We need scientists and researchers to find better ways to treat disease etc. Do what you feel is best for you. But consider how you speak about nursing and nurses. A nurse is more likely to help you care for a patient if they are treated with respect.
  6. by   globalRN
    I am late to this discussion....personally, I prefer NP to PA. I hold licence in NH which is an 'independent' NP practice state.
    In my practice....I diagnose and treat AND use my psychosocial skills all the time. Understanding where patients and their families are coming from can facilitate the success of your treatment plan. Ever wonder why there are so many 'noncompliant' patients? Lots of times, they never understood what the game plan was or how it related to them or someone(PCP) never took the time to do some patient education or .... patient assessment beyond the physical and physiological assessment.
    My .02
  7. by   globalRN
    oh and what gives with ...the thinking that medical doctors don't give holistic care? The good ones always do.
  8. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    By Globalrn
    oh and what gives with ...the thinking that medical doctors don't give holistic care? The good ones always do.
    Good point Global. Those posters are stereotyping. Most MDs I've ever gone to for care or worked with, have been oriented to the patient, not just the pathology.

    As a respiratory therapist, I was more often treated as a colleauge in the patients care, and got to see the kinder side of physicians, if I demonstrated an interest in their thought process as it related to the medical model and showed an aptitude to understand the way they do things individualy.

    one would think that with more than 800 posts I've made, anyone making the statement that I have a "God complex" or that I'm arrogant, could easily quote me to make the argument.

    Alas, stereotyping is good enough. Those that favor the medical model over the psychosocial one, must be hateful nazis that despise humanity, treat patients like dirt, and disrespect nurses.
    :chuckle
  9. by   Rena RN 2003
    one would think that with more than 800 posts I've made, anyone making the statement that I have a "God complex" or that I'm arrogant, could easily quote me to make the argument.

    Alas, stereotyping is good enough. Those that favor the medical model over the psychosocial one, must be hateful nazis that despise humanity, treat patients like dirt, and disrespect nurses.
    the god complex is in the "attitude" of your post, not in a specific quote. the wording of you post while sophisticated at best are sometimes read as haughty and pompous.

    and while you are choosing between the medical and psychosocial aspects of care, many of the nurses and nursing students here make no distinction between the two. they walk hand in hand. in order for a nurse to successfully give care to a patient with COPD, he/she must understand the disease process or the SCIENTIFIC aspects of the pathophysiology. he/she must understand how the body is working so one will know what to do and most importantly what NOT to do. in order for that same nurse to increase patient compliance with treatment at home, he/she must understand the PSYCHOSOCIAL aspects that apply to that same patient. he/she must educate and support the WHOLE (*gasp* Holistic?) person. he/she must apply NURSING INTERVENTIONS that have the greatest chance of being followed all the while doing the best to increase quality of life.

    now, before you decide to spout about how medical drs and PAs do the exact same thing, i'll save you time. some do, some don't.

    the same as there are NURSES that bothered to learn the why's and wherefor's before they gave patient care as well as those that saw no good reason to learn why NURSES do what they do.
  10. by   Rena RN 2003
    oh and best of luck. someone else said it best about you needing to be in research or whatnot. you obviously have no desire to LEARN about nursing as nursing IS more than just patho. it's nice to know that someone as dedicated to hard, concrete facts will be developing new "cures" while the holistic caregivers will be delivering the care.
  11. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    So, only nurses really know how to care for people. The rest of the healthcare system are all just wannabees uhh? Even though the same prerequisites that apply to psychosocial markers are in both PA and RN prerequisites, only nurses can figure out how to use it somehow, while also learning the same applications for pathophysiology as to make a seamless comparison in their knowledge bases?

    That would make ADNs better qualified than a PA to care for patients.

    To think, PA programs have been wasting everybody's time putting life-span development, psychology, sociology, into their programs, while it turns out only nursing students can understand how it fits into pt care.

    I'm glad you pointed that out...............Wow, that's going to save me 4 extra years of school.
  12. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    *edited by Zoe*
    Some things are just better left unsaid.

    Zoe
    Last edit by DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE on Jan 13, '03
  13. by   Rena RN 2003
    see, your godlyness is showing. :chuckle

    [quote]from rena's post

    now, before you decide to spout about how medical drs and PAs do the exact same thing, i'll save you time. some do, some don't.

    the same as there are NURSES that bothered to learn the why's and wherefor's before they gave patient care as well as those that saw no good reason to learn why NURSES do what they do.



    and you obviously didn't read my post or bother to interpret it.

    SOME nurses (although this has not been MY experience) do not wish to deal with psychosocial or as you have referred to it "the touchy feely" aspects of nursing. the same as SOME drs. and PAs have focused so much on the "science" of medicine that they've lost a "bedside" manner along the way.


    Even though the same prerequisites that apply to psychosocial markers are in both PA and RN prerequisites
    and if you detested the psychosocial aspects so much in the nursing program, what makes you think you'll like it any better in a PA program?

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