Anyone unsuccessful in nursing school but excel as a nurse?? - page 2

I am currently in nursing school and I am not doing as well as I have hoped. I am the type of person that takes longer to learn things, but does extremely well once things are learned. I am a hands... Read More

  1. by   NurseLauraM
    I don't quite understand the "tactile learning" thing when the bulk of your exams are on paper. I understand that it is difficult to read about a procedure and do it cold, without being able to handle the equipment, practice on classmates, etc. first. However, what sort of "tactile" learning would you recommend for mastering NCLEX-style exam questions? If by "tactile" learning you mean "learn by doing", aren't you getting that in clinical?
  2. by   NurseLauraM
    Quote from Jess__
    Thank you for this! Im glad to hear you have done so well! There was 13 out of 17 of us that didn't pass our med surg II class, including myself. We just had a mental health exam that 2 passed out of I think 30 people.. so I've been really discouraged lately.
    Something is not right here! Only 4 people passed the course? Is your school accredited?
  3. by   Jess__
    Yes we are accredited. they just keep changing things though. No more power points, quizzes over lecture material before we lecture it( I know some schools do this already), ATI used to be worth 5 points, now it's worth 60 and our classes are usually only out of about 350 points. Our dean also took away our pinning ceremony which people have been upset about.
  4. by   Mavrick
    Without knowing the unedited parts of the original post, I think most of us assumed the title of "unsuccessful in nursing school" meant failing.

    Thus, if you are unsuccessful in nursing school and do not graduate you will never be a nurse to excel or otherwise.


    Nursing itself is not all "hands-on". You will be expected to abide by written policies/procedures whether or not anyone has shown you how to do them.

    Hopefully you can modify your learning style and learn how to be a nurse. People do learn differently. You could be an excellent teacher to those with your "tactile learning".
  5. by   roser13
    You've mentioned twice that your classes are "only out of about 350 points." What does that mean and why is it important?
  6. by   tyvin
    My thing is if you're taking notes you can't listen to what is being said. Research shows you must hear something 3 times in order to fully understand (RN 3 count meds). I taped my lectures and listened to them in the car on my way home. It's amazing how much you miss if you take notes and that's why study groups are good. In study groups one person caught one thing and another caught another point missed by others...etc.

    I did very well in school and I am an excellent RN (if I do say so myself). Everyone needs to stop comparing GPAs and get on with the studying. Recognize what kind of learner you are and go from there.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from roser13
    Your title is misleading. You have not excelled as a nurse because you are not yet a nurse. A nurse is fully educated, both in the classroom and in hands-on patient care.

    You are not simply in a situation where you're doing "lousy." You are in a situation where you are failing essential classes. You cannot use the excuse that you are "a hands on learner, not book." It simply doesn't work that way. You must either figure out a way to become a student who is able to learn in the classroom (study groups, tutoring, etc.) or figure out a way to change your life goals.

    Because nursing is considered a "caring" profession, it is easy for folks to assume that if they just care​ enough, they can be a nurse.
    The title is misleading, and I thought it was going to be one of those posts where the poster did poorly in school, passed the NCLEX in the 10th try and nevertheless believes that they excel as a nurse because they are just oozing compassion.

    "Because nursing is considered a caring profession, it is easy for folks to assume that if they just care enough, they can be a nurse" ought to be made a sticky!
  8. by   studentbear
    First of all, I hear you on feeling frustrated when nursing school is structured in such a way where the bulk of our information comes in a medium that may not be easiest for us to learn. I do really, really well learning skills and struggle with learning theory. But this is the way it is. To make the most of the situation, it sounds like you need to critically evaluate your learning style and come up with solutions. For example, for lectures/"book stuff" I know that I am a very visual learner who does best with interactive material. I do not learn well by just listening or reading. I have always been able to get great grades in college but then began struggling when I got to harder pre-reqs like micro and a&p. Here is my process lately:
    1. Skim the chapters before class and highlight pertinent material
    2. Print out power points and take notes on them during class-- this allows me to actually pay attention to what the professor is saying, rather than trying to make a mad scramble to write down everything
    3. After class, I re-watch/re-listen to lecture and revise my notes (I basically compile the powerpoint and the notes I took in class as well as any additional info I missed that I am able to catch during the second listen of the lecture)
    4. I make sets of the material on Quizlet and use the "test" and "learn" functions
    5. I find a buddy/group to quiz me on the material
    6. Any kind of fancy interactive website things that come with the textbook

    I recently went through the process of neurocognitive testing and that was also a valuable tool. I highly recommend it, if you're able to.
  9. by   smartnurse1982
    I can relate to the OP except i am an Adn Rn who is having a tough,tough time with WGU's Biochem course,so in essence I am failing.

    I really do not know what to do at this point,but I think I might actually have to sit in a classroom in order to learn vs doing it on my own.

    I do not understand who Microbiology and Chemistry(taken during the Adn program) was so easy but Biochem is so hard.
  10. by   Meriwhen
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    I can relate to the OP except i am an Adn Rn who is having a tough,tough time with WGU's Biochem course,so in essence I am failing.

    I really do not know what to do at this point,but I think I might actually have to sit in a classroom in order to learn vs doing it on my own.

    I do not understand who Microbiology and Chemistry(taken during the Adn program) was so easy but Biochem is so hard.
    Some classes for some people don't translate well into online versions. I took my Microbio in person because I knew it was going to be one of those classes where it'd be better have the instructor right there to explain things, as well as to be to ask questions and get quick answers/ongoing dialog.

    I also wanted to escape a toddler for a few hours each day, but that's besides the point
  11. by   Workitinurfava
    What type of learner are you? I am the kind of learner that has to teach myself after having learned the info, so that it is understandable to me. I once rewrote my teachers homework assignment and she asked me if she could use my work to teach other students. It was cleared through the dean of course and I signed off giving her permission. Seriously, I was at home like what the heck, the questions don't make sense. I made them make sense (took a chance), answered them and got an A. Most teachers teach things one way. Peoples brains aren't wired one way so you have to figure out how your brain is wired to learn. Don't think that your are dumb.
  12. by   Jess__
    I took my chemistry in person and had no clue what my professor was talking about. The last time I had taken chemistry was probably 12 years ago. I ended up watching youtube videos and passed the class with a B!
  13. by   emmjayy
    Quote from Jess__
    Thank you for this! Im glad to hear you have done so well! There was 13 out of 17 of us that didn't pass our med surg II class, including myself. We just had a mental health exam that 2 passed out of I think 30 people.. so I've been really discouraged lately.
    I hope your school is taking a hard look at how they're presenting material. 76% of your class didn't pass med surg and 93% of your class failed an exam on mental health? That is absolutely crazy and a horrible indicator for the school. I find it hard to believe that 28 students who were bright enough to get into nursing school failed an exam because they were all lazy/bad at studying/stupid/whatever.

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