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NurseLauraM

NurseLauraM

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NurseLauraM's Latest Activity

  1. NurseLauraM

    Best NP Specialties for Single Parents

    Not acute care. Not primary care unless you are in an area where people are generally very healthy (e.g. private practice in a rich suburb). In my experiencing the following might be worth exploring: - Dermatology - Weight loss clinic - Retail health - Allergy clinic - Orthopedics - Sleep clinic
  2. The health science bachelor's won't give you any clinical skills, so I would not bother with that unless you want to go into public health or something of that sort. Medical assistants usually work outpatient and CNAs in the hospital. If you want to work outpatient I would become an MA, otherwise go for the CNA. Good luck!
  3. NurseLauraM

    Workplace Harassment forced me to resign

    I'm just going to be blunt here. If your judgement is so poor that you think it is appropriate to compare the Holocaust to your (most likely) paid "stress leave", then you were probably the problem.
  4. NurseLauraM

    Insight into what some of you have done with an FNP degree

    An FNP will only give you more opportunities if you're willing to see a broader population than women's health. It seems like a women's health NP program would be a better fit for you
  5. NurseLauraM

    Career Change

    Ever thought of being a school nurse? I'm not one but it sounds like it could potentially be a good fit for you. Maybe post in the school nursing forum for feedback? I worked outpatient as an RN (and now as an NP) and loved it. It would satisfy a lot of your requirements with regards to your schedule and preferences, especially if in a pediatric office. Most of my "real-life" friends and family are not in the medical profession and work 9-5, M-F jobs. It's nice to be able to meet up with them after work, spend weekends together, etc. I also had a coworker who did home care with a developmentally disabled child. She LOVED the job and eventually went full time with it. It sounded like a lot of work at times (of course, all nursing is), but it seemed very rewarding for her. She even went on family trips with them. Home care definitely isn't for everyone but who knows, maybe you'd love it. By the way, she was paid very well (same as inpatient nurses in my area).
  6. NurseLauraM

    NCLEX RN 14 times

    Even if this statement were true, it does not mean the reverse is correct. In what scenario is an incompetent nurse a good nurse? I realize I am being a bit harsh. Did you really expect to post about failing 14 times and have nothing but kind, encouraging responses? There is absolutely nothing shameful about admitting defeat. Plenty of us have given up on dreams before becoming nurses. For example, I wanted to be a veterinarian at one point, but it was not realistic for me. Everyone fails at something at least once in their life.
  7. NurseLauraM

    NCLEX RN 14 times

    If this post is even real... Stop taking the NCLEX. I believe there are different forms of intelligence, and I would like to think there is a career out there for you in which you will succeed. It seems to me you do not have the level of critical thinking required to be a nurse. I don't believe in any god. However, if one did exist, it would not be in his or her best interest to allow a seriously incompetent person become a nurse.
  8. Something is not right here! Only 4 people passed the course? Is your school accredited?
  9. I don't quite understand the "tactile learning" thing when the bulk of your exams are on paper. I understand that it is difficult to read about a procedure and do it cold, without being able to handle the equipment, practice on classmates, etc. first. However, what sort of "tactile" learning would you recommend for mastering NCLEX-style exam questions? If by "tactile" learning you mean "learn by doing", aren't you getting that in clinical?
  10. NurseLauraM

    FNPs don't let me down!!! Where's the Money?

    Primary care has always paid the least. Average general practitioner salary for both NPs and MDs is less than in specialties. That doesn't mean an FNP salary needs to be excessively low (someone recently posted saying they are an NP making 60,000 a year... yikes.) However, in general, primary care will always pay less than specialty. I'm a relatively new FNP and, while I could have worked in a specialty setting and made more, I prefer the primary care setting. I have so much variety in my work day. In one day I might put in an IUD, do a pediatric physical, do a home visit to a geriatric patient, and treat someone with bipolar (we take on a lot of psych because the wait list is over a year to see a psychiatrist here). I see the appeal of specialty care as well, and the extra money would be welcome, but I don't like any one particular area of medicine so much that I want to do it exclusively. I guess I'm the "jack of all trades, master of none" type
  11. NurseLauraM

    Support Planned Parenthood Today!

    I can attest to the fact that PP offers services aside from abortion. I went there as a teenager for plan B (which is not abortion) and STI testing after the condom broke the first time I had sex (you can imagine how panicked I was). I also got my OCPs from them for a number of years. They made it affordable for me, even without using health insurance. Growing up in a very small town where the pharmacist knew my sister, and my PCP was very close to my mother, I felt my care was much more confidential at the PP a couple towns over.
  12. NurseLauraM

    Best private student loans for large amounts?

    So the reason you can't pay cash is because at the time that your downpayment is due your funds will be limited (due to the nature of your business)? If so, could you take out the loan and then pay it off within a year or so? That way you will minimize the amount you have to spend on interest. Also, if you are taking out a loan that you expect to pay back within a short period, it would be wise to take one with a low interest rate, regardless of whether it is fixed or variable. On the other hand, if you plan to spread your repayment out over a number of years you should absolutely get one with a fixed interest rate, as some private loans can get up towards 20% without warning. Are you able to take out federal loans? You should be able to for graduate school, but if you already have a BS, you may have trouble getting a second BS (the BSN) covered.
  13. NurseLauraM

    Best private student loans for large amounts?

    Do you have a financial advisor? They can be expensive, but not as costly as the possibility of mismanaging the large piles of money you seem to be handling. It sounds like you could afford one too. Here's a link to a decent article about it When Is It Time To Hire A Financial Advisor? - Money Under 3� I've only taken out federal loans so I can't help you pick a private lender. However, I've recently seen a lot of negative articles circulating about Navient so you may want to avoid them. Edit: I see now that crazydoglady suggested the same (to get a financial advisor). Sorry for being repetitive but... please do!
  14. NurseLauraM

    One C+ ruined everything

    I understand your frustration, being so close! Would your school count A&P credit from a community college? If so, you could take just the one class at a community college this summer, get the B- and then apply to the nursing program.
  15. NurseLauraM

    First interview advice

    Bring a professional-looking portfolio with your resume, references, copy of your license, etc. and have it handy. They usually have this stuff printed, but sometimes they forget or they lose it. A quick google search of "common interview questions" or "interview questions for nurses" will help you anticipate what they might ask. Read them and think about your responses (if you can, try and practice with someone who can give you feedback if you can). Also be prepared to answer the "where else have you applied?" question. That one caught me off guard the first time. It's sort of like when you go on a date and they say "so, are you seeing anyone else?" You could actually probably make a lot of comparisons between interviews and dates. I think there is a Seinfeld bit on it.