4 years to complete an ADN?!?! - page 3

I just found out today that by going to the community college to get my ADN, it is going to take 4 years for me to finish. What the heck is that all about?? I don't understand that because why would... Read More

  1. by   Nursing N 2004
    Quote from Lauren3249
    I just found out today that by going to the community college to get my ADN, it is going to take 4 years for me to finish. What the heck is that all about?? I don't understand that because why would I want to waste all that time. I thought it was supposed to be 2 years, not 4. That's a fricken BSN. Is this normal?? This is how it adds up (if you care to follow along): 1st semester is pre-reqs that you have to do (A&P 1 w/lab, English Comp, Intro to Sociology, College Algebra). Then they just added that you also have to complete Microbiology w/ lab and A&P w/ lab the next semester before you can even apply to the nursing program. By the time you complete all of these required pre-reqs, you will have missed the application deadline for fall admission to the nursing program. So you have to apply for Spring admission into the nursing program. Add that all up and that comes to 3 full semesters before I can even start the nursing program itself. The nursing program is then another 5 semesters (no way around that).

    What kind of crap is this?? Plus, I'll have to fill up my schedule with a bunch of meaningless courses so that I can stay full-time for financial aid purposes. Is this what everybody goes through for an ADN???
    [font=Comic Sans MS]Hi...I know our programs around here are ADN's 2 years after pre-req's are finished (which could be 1 semester to 1 year). BSN is 4 years w/ pre-req's included. That is in IL/MO!!!! Good Luck!

    [font=Comic Sans MS]Michelle
  2. by   luckymichelle
    This is the most annoying subject for me!

    It drives me absolutely INSANE! I'm glad I'm not alone. I'll be in school for 3.5 years when I get my ADN. If I wasn't mislead upfront, I would've probably gone the BSN route, although it is a much more expensive option.

    In my area, the RN program wait list is up to 5 years in most areas. I have been waiting to do this since I graduated high school, and I'm 27 now. They keep changing requirements, program scheduling, etc. I did my pre-reqs this year, and in the fall I start my LPN program. Then, the following Jan, I'll start the RN bridge, provided that I can get in, they can't give me any garuntees. It's such a pain in the patoot. :angryfire
  3. by   Kyriaka
    If fact, I think it is deceptive for the colleges to put down that it is a 2 year program.

    They should say 2--4 year program.

    The same with the so--called 1 year LPN. It should be 1--2 years.
  4. by   Kyriaka
    Also, there should be the same pre--req's statewide.

    There are 3 local BSN programs. In most cases you would apply to all 3 and hope to get into one.

    But there is a big problem. What courses to take.

    One requires economics, the other 2 dont.

    One requires managemnt, the other 2 dont.

    A differant one requires language, but the other 2 do not.

    Two require philosophy. However, one of those you can substitute Sociology but the other college you cannot.

    Two require religion one doesnt. One of these ehtics can be sustituted.

    One requires ethics but not religion although you can possibly get a waiver to substitue.

    One requires nutrition but the two dont.

    ***
    So to cover yourself you have to take ALL of these courses because you dont know which program you will be accpeted into. Which adds even more time. :angryfire
  5. by   Lauren3249
    Quote from Kyriaka
    If fact, I think it is deceptive for the colleges to put down that it is a 2 year program.

    They should say 2--4 year program.

    The same with the so--called 1 year LPN. It should be 1--2 years.
    I totally agree. It just doesn't seem right.
  6. by   purplemania
    If you already had your pre-reqs the nursing school portion is two years. Same as for BSN, except they build the pre-reqs into the course work over a 4 year period. I had lots of pre-reqs done before I switched major to nursing, so the ADN was faster for me. But I was not satisfied and got the BSN in order to earn more (pay diff at my facility is $1/hr more for BSN). Anyway, I think the curriculum does not vary much from state to state, so you are stuck with the decision as to what type degree you seek.
  7. by   Love-A-Nurse
    you think it may also depend on if a person is going full or part-time and if they "sat" out a semester or two that determines the lenght it takes to get the required courses out of the way?

    the actual nursing classes/clinical along with the required cor-reqs/general classes can be completed in 2 years where i just graduated from.

    it took me 3 1/2 years because i complete all of my needed/support classes for adn and some for bsn, therefore, i missed getting in a year earlier because they only admit once a year.



  8. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from love-a-nurse
    you think it may also depend on if a person is going full or part-time and if they "sat" out a semester or two that determines the lenght it takes to get the required courses out of the way?

    the actual nursing classes/clinical along with the required cor-reqs/general classes can be completed in 2 years where i just graduated from.

    it took me 3 1/2 years because i complete all of my needed/support classes for adn and some for bsn, therefore, i missed getting in a year earlier because they only admit once a year.
    it will have taken me 4 years to get my adn i have gone to school full time the whole way thru. 18 units per semester to get all the prereqs done...even did the nursing program full time. i took summer courses and never took a break. california has lots of requirements for nursing schools here to go by. so, yes it can take 4 years even if you hustle like i "tried" to do
  9. by   career2
    Looks to me like a BSN takes about the same time as an ADN. Of course the BSN school will cost more money. News Flash -- the rich get richer!

    If I can get into any BSN program I will probably do it.


    Quote from Lauren3249
    I just found out today that by going to the community college to get my ADN, it is going to take 4 years for me to finish. What the heck is that all about?? I don't understand that because why would I want to waste all that time. I thought it was supposed to be 2 years, not 4. That's a fricken BSN. Is this normal?? This is how it adds up (if you care to follow along): 1st semester is pre-reqs that you have to do (A&P 1 w/lab, English Comp, Intro to Sociology, College Algebra). Then they just added that you also have to complete Microbiology w/ lab and A&P w/ lab the next semester before you can even apply to the nursing program. By the time you complete all of these required pre-reqs, you will have missed the application deadline for fall admission to the nursing program. So you have to apply for Spring admission into the nursing program. Add that all up and that comes to 3 full semesters before I can even start the nursing program itself. The nursing program is then another 5 semesters (no way around that).

    What kind of crap is this?? Plus, I'll have to fill up my schedule with a bunch of meaningless courses so that I can stay full-time for financial aid purposes. Is this what everybody goes through for an ADN???
  10. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from career2
    Looks to me like a BSN takes about the same time as an ADN. Of course the BSN school will cost more money. News Flash -- the rich get richer!

    If I can get into any BSN program I will probably do it.
    Agreed. I was able to get into the ADN program immediately and that is the main reason why I went ahead with it. Of course, it feels great not to have any student loans either! I would have gotten the loans though, if I were accepted into a BSN program and I needed money. The end result is the same....RN licensure (hopefully)
  11. by   Lauren3249
    Something I was thinking... does a BSN really take 4 years like it is supposed to? I wonder if there are people that have spent 5 or 6 six years working on their BSN even going full-time.
  12. by   gladtobeOB
    Wow, you poor souls who have to go to school 4 yrs for a ADN!!!! Ours was 2yrs which included ALL the courses, some students right out of high school as well as others were done in 2 yrs. Our course catalog stated courses were either prerequisites or concurrent with whatever class. Several students after graduating with ADN went back for their BSN and are now done with their studies and have their BSN, although they didn't work full time like me. I will HOPEFULLY be done this fall(5 more classes) I work full time and was taking at least 12 credits a semester for my bsn and am married with 3 kids.
  13. by   Energizer Bunny
    Alexander....what school in Buffalo? I am going to JCC in Jamestown!

    To whoever said you have to take all your pre-req's before the program, you don't here. I took A&P I, Psych and pre-statistics. That's it and the rest are being filtered into my core nursing curriculum. This also helps me to stay full time for my financial aid. I won't have a problem with credit hours. Now, if someone were just starting this fall in my class (which many are) they are doing the three year deal and will graduate in 2007, but most of them still have to do all pre-req's.

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