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Kyriaka

Kyriaka

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  1. Kyriaka

    Question for clinical students.

    Aussie, I did contact the University's public relations office today. The more I think about this the more put off I am. If the program is online and has replaced traditional lecture teaching with videos...I think I should have been aware of that ahead of time. I would have never, ever entered a program under these conditions. The money (thousands in lost tuition for this one semester) and time wasted. Unbelievable. I have looked at the Radiology Dept. but have decided to go ahead and pursue a Masters of Science in Biology and teach at the college level.
  2. Kyriaka

    Question for clinical students.

    Aussie, the teaching style is just not for me. There is another BSN program in town at a Jesuit school (100% passage). I want to sit down with the Radiology Dept. and just hear what they have to say. My prereq's basically are the same (I have more than I need). I dont know much about the program But I think it is worth looking into. Withdrawing from the program was emotional. I worked very hard to get into that program (they chose 38 out of 400 applicants). I gave away my books/supplies and told the school to donate my uniform to someone who cannot afford their own. On a side note, some of the videos are so old that the nurse is not wearing gloves. But ,you know, there were kids in my class who could learn with the video. But I cant. It just isnt my way.
  3. Kyriaka

    Question for clinical students.

    I still agree with what I posted before, but yest. I withdrew from the Nursing program. I am now looking into the Bach. of Radiology Science. There were several reasons for my decisions. Mainly the teaching method. The University program that I entered is now all online. There is NO lecture/ traditonal teaching any longer. I was not aware of this when I entered the program. I spent 90% of my time downloading notes (aprx. 300 pages for each course). You watch videos online and then are tested. I cannot learn that way. In adm. of meds we were told to download the notes and then we will have a test. No lecture. No instruction. I have heard that other schools are not like this. And the school is experimenting with this method. My understanding is that since the online teaching has started, passage on NCLEX has gone down significantly (from almost 100%) and that the 2nd semester group has already lost over 10 people. I believe that online has its place...but should never ever replace good old fashioned teaching.
  4. I am in the traditional program and was not interested in the other one. The accelerated program turns a 5 semester program into a little over 2 semesters. I think it is crazy. And I dont think it is safe. But it probably does appeal to people who want to get their classes over quickly. I just know...it is not for me.
  5. Kyriaka

    Which School is better?

    I am a student at the University of South Alabama (USA). I think it is a good school.
  6. Kyriaka

    Any studying suggestions?

    Here are my suggestions. I maintain a 99% GPA. First, get the right mindset. Dismiss the idea from your mind that a grade is dependant on smart. Smart has very little to do with it. It is NOTHING compared to determination and dedication. Assign yourself a work study area. It should be well lighted, away from all electronics (meaning radios and tv's), comfortable temp. wise, and quiet!! I actually wear headphones to keep the noice level down. Take the phone off the hook (or turn your cell phone off). Never study more than one hour at a time (with a 30 min break) and never more than 4 hours a day. Never less than one hour a day. Figure out the amount of study time needed. I have my own formula: Hours taken +5. This semester I will be putting in 21 hours a week of study. Never ever cram. Put study time in perspective. Their are students who say they study 20 hours a week. But if they have the tv on, answering phone calls, looking out a window, listening to the radio, ect. --it is worthless. There was a study done years ago that said you can only put 7 bits of information in your long term memory a day. Also, when you sleep on information your brain can look at the information in a new way. *** I have a strict way I study. And it works for me. I type all my notes. If the teacher hands out notes, I rewrite them in my own format. And I read all my notes every day.
  7. Kyriaka

    Question for clinical students.

    What I personally see is that it is very difficult for those who have crammed up to this point. And because many colleges have gotten so lenient with behavior and dress...it is a rude awakening for the younger ones. The kids in my class are already talking about how hard it is because of the rules. You know what the rules are?? You have to be there. 2 missed clinical days--out. No chewing gum. No thongs, multiple ear piercings, or body piercings. No tatoos. No scaling of grades and no bonus points. But you know what...when I was in college before--this was THE NORM. ** Hard work and knowledge are NEVER EVER a waste.
  8. _______________ It isnt really a worry, so much as it does put some pressure on the back when you stand up straight. I tend to lean forward (still with my back straight) to relieve the pressure. In my case it is very clear it is lumbar.
  9. ________________ Not fused. Fully formed. Not Spina bifida Occulata. NORMALLY lumbar only has 5, but there is a defect where you can be born with over 5. In fact, I believe Cro Magnum man had 7/8.
  10. I always give the standard response: I was saved 2000 years ago. But everyone holds the keys to Hell if that is what they wish.
  11. My grandmother also was born with this condition. I really havent had any problems until recently (if I stand straight for a period of time). If I lean forward, I am fine. I just would like to read a bit on this condition. If anyone knows any resources I would be greatful. Either European, Asian, ect. outside sources other than standard US fare would be fantastic.
  12. Kyriaka

    artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo

    The "experts" can say all they want to about PVS...they dont feel anything, they are just a blob..but I am NOT willing to gamble with my soul on the unknown. What I do know is that I was on full life support 12 years ago (feeding tube & vent along with other various other things). My parents were told there was no hope for me. And if I did recover, I would be in a wheechair & retarded. The hospital tried in ernest to have my vent turned off. My parents refused and the Dr.s rolled their eyes at the silliness of my parents holding out hope. Forms were pushed in front of my family with pens ready to give away my organs as soon as the vent was turned off and I came to my end. But I was "in there" trying in earnest to communicate. I went thru the burn "baths" with possibly the staff not being as careful because some of them thinking I could feel nothing. But I did. Give Terri the benefit of the doubt. I dont care what the "experts" say. We do not know enough about the brain to determine exactly what is going on.
  13. Kyriaka

    artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo

    _______________ You could always give him enough narcotics to make him have no pain or consciousness. And still...you would have people climbing the walls because it would be cruel of it all.
  14. Kyriaka

    artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo

    This is an article that ran today from a mother whose daughter is on a feeding tube (with a flat eeg) and whose own mother is on a feeding tube; _____________ Sandwiched between feeding tubes: The lessons By Marianne M. Jennings Our daughter, Claire, has had a feeding tube for 10 years, and my mother is closing in on one year with hers. I am generationally sandwiched between feeding tube patients. Like Terri Schiavo, no one is really sure how much breaks through my daughter's or mother's neurological remnants. Also like Mrs. Schiavo, neither needs a respirator. To the clinical, the three are in a "vegetative state." The inexperienced callously refer to them as clumps of flesh that hover in a puzzling state for inexplicable reasons. But those of us who live with and care for these magnificent souls question the analyses hurled about as cherished life hangs in the balance. I offer my lessons from a decade of exposure to the "vegetative state." Doctors are almost always wrong. While I have the highest respect for the physicians who have treated our daughter and my mother and will be forever grateful for their selfless efforts and care, I know, and perhaps they do too, that these patients are unique. Doctors are inevitably taken aback at some point by Claire and patients like her who fight for their lives. If I had dug my daughter's grave each time a doctor told me she wouldn't live, I'd be in China by now. Their first death prediction was six months, then it was three years. When Claire turned 10, the good docs called her an outlier and threw in the towel on death predictions. Claire turned 18 two months ago. Doctors read CAT scans, MRIs, and EEGs, and conclude that, clinically, there ain't nothin' there. But doctors are not with these patients 24-7. Our Claire has a perfectly flat EEG. From what I can determine, Terri Schiavo is higher functioning than our Claire. Yet each morning when we touch the bottom of her shirt to prepare for her shower, she closes her eyes in anticipation of that shirt coming over her face. She clinches her teeth if you put a washcloth to her face because washcloths mean a good mouth cleaning and she, like all 3-6-month infants (Claire's developmental age) wants no part of that. She turns her head when you say her name. Claire's smiles come mostly in response to her mother's and her father's voices. They feel, they flinch, they startle, they turn, they moan, they react, they have some memory, and no one truly knows how much gets through, what is serendipitous, and what is a real response. When in doubt, doubt the doctors. Spirituality engulfs the vegetative. Be afraid. The life that exists in these struggling frames has had the judicial imprimatur of "So not worth it" placed upon it and the plug (tube) pulled. Yet the life that resides in these bodies so ravaged by immobility scares the livin' daylights out of me. If you already believe in a g-d, these souls will confirm your faith. If you don't believe, well, I have seen atheists and agnostics humbled, silenced, and in tears as they stumbled upon a spiritual experience that caught them unawares. These are the very elect of beings. Those who allow these lives to be taken, especially in reliance upon clinical reports, engage in the sentencing of innocents. Leo the Dog, hurled to his death in a California road rage case, engendered more outrage and due process. These souls should have the rights and respect of cats, dogs, ANWR moose, and death row inmates. If I turned our cat loose on the streets and refused her daily Little Sheba rations, I'd be charged with misdemeanors galore and sentenced to community service at the pound. And our cat has no cognitive skills, save for the ability to sniff bumpers. Scott Peterson will enjoy hearings and representation over the next decade as he sits on death row, where he will die a natural death. Where is Terri Schiavo's lawyer? Who does indeed speak for her? When our Claire turned 18, my husband and I had to petition to become her guardians. We were investigated, went to court, and paid for a lawyer for Claire so that the state of Arizona could be assured that Claire was in the right home with decent folk. There was no clamoring at the court house for custody of Claire, and the hearing was mercifully short. Three months and $972 later, not including copying costs, we were appointed guardians of our own child. How do Florida courts get away with less, not for just guardianship, but for the life of the ward herself? If Congress can dictate disability benefits, medical privacy, and any number of long-term care issues, it should make public policy on euthanasia for the disabled who have no living will. We are not here for them. They are here for us. I don't know why my mother has had to suffer physically at the end of her life. I have never understood why our Claire has had a life filled with illness, epilepsy, and deformity, or why we have a child who will never utter her first words. But my family and I have learned more from these two non-speaking souls than in any of our many studies for degrees. We have had our priorities shaped and our characters molded through their stoic presence. Eliminating them would mean no more diaper changes, no more feeding bags, and no more "1 - 2 -3 lift!" as we struggle to rotate their positions. But if I lost my Claire or my mother, I would spend a lifetime longing to be of service again, to have just one more time to feel the warmth of those neurologically curled fingers. I fear for the clinical callousness of this tube removal. We turn our backs on the closest thing this world has to offer when it comes to angels. This removal is a giant leap backwards as mankind denies its spirituality and harms the helpless. I worry about the precedent for our Claire and my mom, but I fear for us
  15. Kyriaka

    artificial feeding-Terri Schiavo

    ______________ She has had no MRI. Wouldnt the husband want the most up to date information? And so what if it was. You know, I am a nursing student. I am a high 4.0. Since this case, I am questioning whether I need to be a nurse because I dont believe in the murder of he handicapped. Nothing that I read about nursing told me that I needed to be pro-euthanasia. Yest. I talked with my favorite teacher about changing my major to chemistry. At least I can make drugs to help people live.
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