100% dosage calculations? - page 3

I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school:lol2:) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from moongirl
    wow, are you passing meds??:uhoh21:
    Yes, I sure am passing medications to 18 patients at a long term care facility on a daily basis. I also have a job as a PRN medication nurse at a psychiatric hospital. In addition, I have never committed a medication error. Med math is virtually never utilized in healthcare facilities.
  2. by   SoulShine75
    Quote from Coloradogrl
    I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and allows you to take 1 retake test.

    I understand why they require this but I was just wondering if most schools do this
    Our tests are usually out of 10 questions or 20. I think you have to make a 90%. If not you have another chance to take it again. It's not hard once you learn how to do it. My only advice is to learn your conversions (ex: 2.2 kg =1 lb & tsp= 5ml etc...) because you'll use them a lot in the future as well as on the dosage calc test. Good luck! :spin:
  3. by   carol72
    I know how three schools do this.

    School #1 100% needed, three tries given
    #2 80% needed, two tries given
    #3 90% needed, two tries given
  4. by   moongirl
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yes, I sure am passing medications to 18 patients at a long term care facility on a daily basis. I also have a job as a PRN medication nurse at a psychiatric hospital. In addition, I have never committed a medication error. Med math is virtually never utilized in healthcare facilities.
    I did 4 dosage calculations in a 3 week rotation in a PCU.
  5. by   smk1
    we start at 80% (no calculators allowed though), then move to 85% etc... was reviewing calculations yesterday. I tend to forget obscure conversions (drams etc...)
  6. by   Kemccanha
    We had to get 100% and had two times to take it!
  7. by   nursekatie22
    At my first school, we had to get at least 80% and we had two tries after the first test, but the first one was the one that went on our grade. If someone didn't pass the third one, they were out of the program.
    At my second school, you had to get an 85% and the other rules still applied.
  8. by   AuntieRN
    We had to get a 90 the first 3 semesters, we had 3 tries, the last 2 semesters we had to make 100% again 3 tries...but if you missed any of them on the third try you were thrown out of the program. That is wayyy too much stress but I do understand why they want you to get the 100%....We were also encouraged to use calculators.
  9. by   wvlpn2
    My school required you to have an 80% or above.
  10. by   momx4
    Ours also requires a 100% by the end of graduation. Our instructor explained it to us this way......" You don't want your nurse to get 7 out of 10 drugs correct do u?" As soon as she said that I agreed and I just do problems here and there so its not a stress.
  11. by   dijaqrn
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yes, I sure am passing medications to 18 patients at a long term care facility on a daily basis. I also have a job as a PRN medication nurse at a psychiatric hospital. In addition, I have never committed a medication error. Med math is virtually never utilized in healthcare facilities.
    Even in facilities with unit dose systems and Pyxis machines packaging errors are made. In LTC there aren't usually pharmacy services 24/7 and you'll need to take dosages from an emergency kit. That said, math is still greatly utilized in health care facilities and nurses and students should always remember that the misplaced decimal point or incorrect calculation could mean the patient's life. I don't have last years stats but I know patients are still dying from med errors. As a new LVN >20 years ago a resident wrote a chemo order on an infant with a treatable ca, misplaced his decimal and neither the pharmacist or the RN caught it. Baby died a slow death from a chemo dose 100 x the correct one. Schools need to have a 100% requirement, my RN program did and no one failed, we just studied harder. Use that calc book and practice!!!!!!!!!!!
  12. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Quote from dijaqrn
    As a new LVN >20 years ago a resident wrote a chemo order on an infant with a treatable ca, misplaced his decimal and neither the pharmacist or the RN caught it. Baby died a slow death from a chemo dose 100 x the correct one.
    Thats actually a good story that should be shared with nursing students re: medication calculations. Well maybe a good story for the learning opportunity that comes from it, not so much for the infant or parents

    I remember one of our instructors shared a similar story with us, and it really hits home how important med calcs are. 100% is not an unreasonable expectation.
  13. by   ~Karen~n~AZ~
    90% @ my college. The test wasn't required in the past but all future, applying students are given three chances to pass. If you don't pass the first test you are required to take a med/dose class. I didn't do very well on the first test but I had never seen any dosage calculations ever. I had to take the class in a sort of 2 week crash course at the end of this past semester. The college just added it onto the courses I was already taking. I passed in with the 90% required.

    Once I start the program I have to take a calculations test every week. I figure I'm going to be a pro in the end.

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