your very own personal crusade - page 4

i think everyone has a personal little cause - that little thing that's really not a big deal, but is a huge deal to you - and i want to know what yours is. mine's pads. pads, not nappies. ... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    My pet peeve is following after a nurse who passed meds and leaves the med on the patient table for the patient to take, walks away and charts it as given. Lo and behold, I come on and the med is still sitting on the table. Bad, very bad.
    Last edit by Thunderwolf on Sep 18, '05
  2. by   SusanJean
    Quote from allele
    I have a few "minor" crusades, but a couple of things that make me cringe....many of our younger (and some older!) CNA's/RN's call our patients "Honey" or "Sweetie"....sounds so disrespectful! From CNA class I was taught to always call patients/residents "Mr.", "Mrs." or "Ms." so-and-so.....and 13 years later I still do until the patient tells me different. I also hate it when they just call the patient by their first name without permission. Now, I'll do if I have an 18 year old patient (I'm 33), but some call people in their 80's and older by their first name!! Especially if the patient is confused. Just doesn't seem right to me.
    Ditto on the names. A friend of mine, in her 40's, was hospitalized for several weeks and had one nurse call her "babydoll." (The least of this nurse's offences.)
    I complained on her behalf to the charge nurse and the offender was not assigned to my friend again.
    SJ
  3. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from Thunderwolf
    My pet peeve is following after a nurse who passed meds and leaves the med on the patient table for the patient to take, walks away and charts it as given. Lo and behold, I come on and the med is still sitting on the table. Bad, very bad.
    Absolutely. Very bad practice to get into. I chart in the MAR "LD not taken" and document when they did take it.
  4. by   chadash
    Not as a patient, but I am a bit older than most of my coworker and I have been called baby, miss priss and others, but I alway felt these were terms of endearment, and they always came from the sweetest people. It may be a cultural thing, cause I think it was said with the kindest intentions.
  5. by   CoffeeRTC
    Dirty O2 tubing/ mask and nebulizer mask drive me nuts!
  6. by   UM Review RN
    It drives me nuts when a tech will come and ask me to call Respiratory for a patient who's having trouble breathing. Then I come into the room and find the patient all scrunched up at the end of the bed.

    How's he gonna take a deep breath in that position?

    So I'm always about bugging everyone to reposition the patient before calling Respiratory. Sometimes that solves the problem.
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Sep 18, '05
  7. by   Bonnie Nurse
    You've hit on a real education gap regarding geriatric assessment. Families and many practitioners don't understand geriatric syndromes. They need to be told repeatedly that the elderly person is not just an older version of what he/she was 25 or 30 years ago. An older adult presents with signs and symptoms that cannot be interpreted correctly within the younger or middle adult context. The elderly just don't automatically become confused, constipated, incontinent, delirius, and prone to falls simply because they are old. If i see an elderly person who has become incontinent, i consider any of the following: delirium, depression, restricted mobility, infection, impaction, polyuria from meds. Another example is when the elderly begin to fall. Changes in liver/kidney function, weight loss/gain, can all cause their meds they've taken for ages to be metabolized differently and can cause them to fall. But NOBODY looks closely at meds! SO yes, "They _________because they're old." just grates on my last nerve. We could keep many older adults functioning longer and more independently if we were to just pay a little more attention and ask "why?" more often. It will be interesting to see how the baby boomer generation deals with being so summarily dismissed. I think that many will not "go gently into that good night" LOL
    Quote from casi
    I totally agree on the diaper thing. They are always refered to as 'briefs', or for my more confused residents they are 'underwear'

    Hmm so far I think that the only crusade that I may have is that fact that I am sick of the excuse "Well that just their Alzheimers." Yesterday they were completely find and today they are lethargic/can't walk/complaining that they're 'sick'/etc.... and that's just Alzheimers. Then when the family starts asking questions and getting concerned the resident ends up in the hospital, or has a couple of labs run and is back to their old self again in a week.
  8. by   meownsmile
    And another one,,, WHY is it that when people are in the hospital bathtimes arent guided by patients habits at home?

    If i hear someone complain one more time because not ALL the baths werent done on DAYs im gonna scream. Face it,, some people sleep better if they bath before bedtime, some like to bath in the AM. As far as im concerned that should be part of the admission interview,, When do you prefer your bath while here? or,, Do you bath regularly in the morning or before bedtime when at home? Then follow the patients lead!!!! If they dont have a problem that warrents bathing frequently, why not let the patient decide?
  9. by   rn/writer
    I really get irritated when health care folks talk to the patients and tack, "Okay?" onto the end of whatever they're saying. "I need to check your blood pressure, okay?" "We're going to start you on a new med, okay?"

    You hear this especially with kids and older people, but it's far too common at all age levels.

    What really adds fuel to my fire is when it's said in a little voice that ends up sounding like the speaker is talking to a baby. On some of the medical shows on Discovery or TLC, you hear this over and over and over.

    One of my objections is that tacking on, "Okay?" implies a choice that often doesn't really exist. What are you going to do if you say, "Okay?" and the patient says, "No." This happens to my grandson who has spina bifida all the time. We've asked the nurses to simply tell him what needs to be done and leave it at that.

    "Okay?" has become a reflex for some people, short hand for, "Did you understand what I just said? Are you okay with it. Are you going to resist?" etc. But when you hear it at the end of sentence after sentence, it starts to sound patronizing.

    I wish health care people would just say what's what and make an actual inquiry now and then instead of the running okays.

    "I would like to listen to your heart and lungs and then I'll help you turn on your side. How does that sound?"
  10. by   CoffeeRTC
    :uhoh21: I've done this before, but I won't any more...okay?

    Quote from rn/writer
    I really get irritated when health care folks talk to the patients and tack, "Okay?" onto the end of whatever they're saying. "I need to check your blood pressure, okay?" "We're going to start you on a new med, okay?"

    You hear this especially with kids and older people, but it's far too common at all age levels.

    What really adds fuel to my fire is when it's said in a little voice that ends up sounding like the speaker is talking to a baby. On some of the medical shows on Discovery or TLC, you hear this over and over and over.

    One of my objections is that tacking on, "Okay?" implies a choice that often doesn't really exist. What are you going to do if you say, "Okay?" and the patient says, "No." This happens to my grandson who has spina bifida all the time. We've asked the nurses to simply tell him what needs to be done and leave it at that.

    "Okay?" has become a reflex for some people, short hand for, "Did you understand what I just said? Are you okay with it. Are you going to resist?" etc. But when you hear it at the end of sentence after sentence, it starts to sound patronizing.

    I wish health care people would just say what's what and make an actual inquiry now and then instead of the running okays.

    "I would like to listen to your heart and lungs and then I'll help you turn on your side. How does that sound?"
  11. by   DenaInWyo
    Quote from Thunderwolf
    My pet peeve is following after a nurse who passed meds and leaves the med on the patient table for the patient to take, walks away and charts it as given. Lo and behold, I come on and the med is still sitting on the table. Bad, very bad.
    UGH! I hate this too, and it seems to be chronic where I work. I know I am a student and will learn more about how "the real world" works once I am out there, but it still seems to me that this is a no-brainer. Our nurses will set residents' med cups down by their plate during meal times and then just mosey off. The problem is, we have several 'hoarders' who like to sneak back in after meals and collect leftovers..whether the leftovers are cookies or pills. I've even found a used, uncapped syringe sitting next to a resident with some pretty serious dementia..wouldn't trust her with a butterknife, let alone something like that. Most of these nurses graduated from the same school I am attending and I KNOW they know better. And nope, a bug in the ear of the DON hasn't done a bit of good.

    Deana
  12. by   stidget99
    Quote from chadash
    Not as a patient, but I am a bit older than most of my coworker and I have been called baby, miss priss and others, but I alway felt these were terms of endearment, and they always came from the sweetest people. It may be a cultural thing, cause I think it was said with the kindest intentions.
    After moving from the north to the south, I have seen a huge cultural difference re: how to address other people. I once had a pt complain about me for being rude and "overly professional/abrupt". They complained that I never used the "terms of endearment" like honey, sweetie, etc and always referred to them as "Mr". I hail from the midwest and was taught that you always address someone as "Mr" or "Ms" until given permission to do otherwise by the patient. This particular pt never gave me express permission to call him by his first name. I have now started calling pts by those terms of endearment simply because it is an expectation down here in the south.

    I also was mildly offended when I first moved down here by being called honey and sweetie and dear. It took me a while to realize that no disrespect is intended. It is a way of the south.
  13. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from meownsmile
    And another one,,, WHY is it that when people are in the hospital bathtimes arent guided by patients habits at home?

    If i hear someone complain one more time because not ALL the baths werent done on DAYs im gonna scream. Face it,, some people sleep better if they bath before bedtime, some like to bath in the AM. As far as im concerned that should be part of the admission interview,, When do you prefer your bath while here? or,, Do you bath regularly in the morning or before bedtime when at home? Then follow the patients lead!!!! If they dont have a problem that warrents bathing frequently, why not let the patient decide?
    I actually had one person tell me the reason they worked 3-11 was so they WOULND'T have to pt baths :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire

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