Your priorities

  1. Your priorities



    In a recent show of "Scrubs" a very interesting view point was presented, that the number one priority for a doctor is the hospital. As I began to dwell on this and reflect this back to my own childhood (growing up as the son of a pastor) I began to realize something. That this attitude of "the profession is always first" is the primary reason that medical field and the pastorate are the two highest stress jobs in America; but also a primary reason for the intense burnout in the two professions. Upon realizing this I questioned several nursing students as to this view, it shocked me that they professed an attitude identical to that of the show. My question now goes to a wider audience and a group with a higher experience level. Do you, as a medical professional, consider the hospital your first priority, why or why not?
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  2. 28 Comments

  3. by   Angela Mac
    Quote from Sahn
    Your priorities



    In a recent show of "Scrubs" a very interesting view point was presented, that the number one priority for a doctor is the hospital. As I began to dwell on this and reflect this back to my own childhood (growing up as the son of a pastor) I began to realize something. That this attitude of "the profession is always first" is the primary reason that medical field and the pastorate are the two highest stress jobs in America; but also a primary reason for the intense burnout in the two professions. Upon realizing this I questioned several nursing students as to this view, it shocked me that they professed an attitude identical to that of the show. My question now goes to a wider audience and a group with a higher experience level. Do you, as a medical professional, consider the hospital your first priority, why or why not?
    I used to believe I could make a difference in helping to save everyone, but jeopardized my relationships with my own family. I was working most of the holdiays & was talked into working my weekends off, and double shifts, and realized that my children were missing out........missing their mother. So above all else---family first--- your career is your job, your family is forever.
  4. by   Gator,SN
    Angela Mac, Your words are so true!!!! My job is important to me and when I'm at work I give 100% but when I leave the building, thats it! I do see a few co-workers who work long hours, double shifts, days off. While admirable at times, they are also always complaining about their homelife. Nothing is as important to me as my children and they deserve to be #1.

    Gator
  5. by   purplemania
    God then family then work.
  6. by   llg
    I think it is a complicated issue that involves balancing and continually adjusting your committments to both your work life and your non-work life. It isn't a matter of one getting 100% of your committment and the other getting 0%.

    Certainly, there are limits to my committment to nursing in general and to any one job in particular. I would never keep a job that significantly hurt me or my family. So, you might say that I am a "personal life comes first" person. However, that is not exactly true.

    I do believe that professional committments are important and that is not only OK, but even desirable for family and friends to understand that you are (I am) a person who is part of the larger community. As a member of society, we have obligations to that community as well the obligations we have to ourselves, families, and friends. The children of firefighters, police officers, military pesonnel, health care workers, etc. learn that early in life and I think that is a good thing. They often grow in character by seeing their parents contribute to the betterment of their community even when it is not convenient or pleasant. The view that parents' lives revolve solely around their children is a developmentally unhealthy one for children beyond infancy -- nor is it the sign of a healthy romantic relationship or friendship. It is a sign of over-dependence and obsession.

    It's a matter of finding a healthy balance -- and being able to shift the priorities to suit the exact situation -- having the wisdom to know when to ask yourself and your family to bear a little burden so that you can contribute to society, and knowing when you need to give more to yourself and/or your family.

    llg
    Last edit by llg on Jun 15, '04
  7. by   Repat
    I always ask - does the hospital make me their priority? No! Don't get me wrong, I love nursing and have been a nurse for a very long time, but when push comes to shove, my family and personal relationships are what is important. As another poster said, I give my all when I am at work and, to be honest, don't think too much about family and friends while I am there. However, if they called and said they needed me, I would be there without thought to the hospital! And I have done that for others, when emergency calls have been recieved. No question....
  8. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Angela Mac
    ... So above all else---family first...
    Think you nailed it, Angela.
  9. by   TexasPoodleMix
    Quote from Angela Mac
    I was working most of the holdiays & was talked into working my weekends off, and double shifts, and realized that my children were missing out........missing their mother. So above all else---family first--- your career is your job, your family is forever.
    I am curious about something, does the admin. "look down" on nurses when they don't constantly work their days off, etc. ??

    I am in a totally unrelated situation right now (a volunteer situation) where if we say "no" we are given alot of guilt, flack, etc.
  10. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    I am curious about something, does the admin. "look down" on nurses when they don't constantly work their days off, etc. ??

    I am in a totally unrelated situation right now (a volunteer situation) where if we say "no" we are given alot of guilt, flack, etc.
    generally speaking, administration will look down on anyone that doesn't benefit them. there is virtually no appreciation from the top brass, thus one of the major reasons for burnout and nursing shortage. they'll work you until they can suck you dry, if you let them.
  11. by   webbiedebbie
    If I don't work, I don't get to pay my bills. If I can't pay my bills, then I am not taking care of my family. I love what I do in nursing. I make every effort to give my patients the best care. What I don't love is how administration makes me feel about nursing.
  12. by   teeituptom
    I work

    therefore I golf

    I used to be serious about work

    now Im serious about golf

    my priorities used to be Work..Family,,Golf

    now its Golf,,family,,,work

    proves we get wiser as we get older
  13. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from teeituptom
    ... I golf

    I used to be serious about work

    now Im serious about golf

    my priorities used to be Work..Family,,Golf

    now its Golf...
    Tom -- Not sure 'bout you.

    The above sounds an awful lot like OJ. Are you really him?
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I agree w/those who say family first. Admin won't be there for me when I am in crisis; my family are. Admin won't be at my dying bed, comforting me; family will be. Blood is thick......thicker than my profession.

    And NO hobby puts my family in the back seat. If that happens, then I will have become my mother and God forbid that.

    Work in its place. Family in my heart.

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