Why I became a nurse, the down and dirty Why I became a nurse, the down and dirty - pg.2 | allnurses

Why I became a nurse, the down and dirty - page 3

I did not become a nurse because I was inspired by the care of an ailing family member received by a nurse. I did not become a nurse to fix the nursing home my grandmother lived in. I did not... Read More

  1. Visit  Kikilaurel profile page
    0
    Libran,
    Its like you put my thoughts into words so I could read them directly. Everyday when people I work with in ER ask me how I'm doing - I say "living the dream"
    Very few people fully understand me - you my friend, are one of them
  2. Visit  nekozuki profile page
    4
    Oh man, it's such a relief to hear I'm not the only person to do this NOT by way of heart-wrenching personal events or a "calling." I'm a rubbernecker who loves science, gross stuff, excitement and the weird/wacky aspects of nursing. As time goes on, I discover more about it that I love, but being a morbid adrenaline junkie is where I started!
    gummi bear, ElSea, kbellows, and 1 other like this.
  3. Visit  RunnerRN2015 profile page
    0
    Quote from libran1984

    I became a nurse because I love blood, guts, and gore.

    I especially love poking people with needles and watching the first splash of blood splatter inside the test tube.

    I love seeing the disease process.
    That's exactly why, after 20 years of teaching, I quit and started nursing school! I never felt "the calling" like so many say they have. From the time I was a little girl, I was intrigued by diseases and surgeries. I did have some experiences with the nurses when my grandmother was in the hospital during her final days but honestly.....I want the gore.
  4. Visit  Reader007 profile page
    1
    Great post OP. There's more than one way to love your job.
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
  5. Visit  NurseCard profile page
    0
    Thanks for that post. ER nurses are indeed a special breed and you all do
    love your jobs more than most, I think. =)

    I first became a nurse because I thought working in a psychiatric hospital
    sounded super cool. I've always been fascinated with mental illness.

    Now I work in a nursing home, and it's not my ideal situation but I'm having
    a hard time wanting to leave. I stay crazy busy, feel a huge sense of
    accomplishment when I've made it through a shift and actually gotten
    everything done, I love the residents, AND... I do feel a divine calling
    to stay and help these people.
  6. Visit  rbekt2010 profile page
    1
    Amen sister!!! Finally, someone posted what I have been feeling for almost 30 years.
    RunnerRN2015 likes this.
  7. Visit  wanderlust99 profile page
    1
    When I sat down at my kitchen table filling out college applications and having to pick a major, I just thought hmmm nursing. I never thought about it before that. Ahhh being young and stupid Sometimes you make the best decisions when you don't over think it and just go with your gut!
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  8. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    0
    Quote from getmethisnownurse
    When I sat down at my kitchen table filling out college applications and having to pick a major, I just thought hmmm nursing. I never thought about it before that. Ahhh being young and stupid Sometimes you make the best decisions when you don't over think it and just go with your gut!
    I make both my best and worst decisions that way
  9. Visit  HouTx profile page
    1
    Hate to go all "Bill Clinton" on this, but it all boils down to your definition of "calling". To me, it means that something meets your needs on a intensely personal level... but not necessarily religious or spiritual in any way. Something about the job 'calls to' your psyche and fills a gap like nothing else could.

    In my case (and many other ICU nurses, whether they admit it or not - LOL) it fulfills my need for control. Yes, I am a control enthusiast. There is no greater control than the means to determine basic physiologic functions -- mechanical ventilation, managing hemodynamics, regulating fluid balance, etc. And the fact that I understand (or can find out) exactly what is going on with my patient.... no need for guesswork. Maybe that's why OB terrifies me - being responsible for that tiny hidden patient... shudder.

    So - I would still argue that that 'thing' that makes nursing so satisfying for you is a 'Calling'.
    linzjane88 likes this.
  10. Visit  linzjane88 profile page
    0
    "Tiny hidden patient"Ha! I love it. It's like a turducken. A patient inside a patient.
  11. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    0
    Quote from HouTx
    Hate to go all "Bill Clinton" on this, but it all boils down to your definition of "calling". To me, it means that something meets your needs on a intensely personal level... but not necessarily religious or spiritual in any way.

    (snip)

    So - I would still argue that that 'thing' that makes nursing so satisfying for you is a 'Calling'.
    Well, yes, if you ignore culturally established meanings, you can make words fit your needs. I did not feel like I was brought to nursing by divine inspiration seeking me out and leading me to it. I made a choice and luckily it was a good one for me.

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