Why do doctors get to play by different rules? - page 3

I filed a complaint about two respiratory therapists and a doctor who came to visit my ICU patient and were dressed unprofessionally. One therapist was wearing scrubs with the pants too low and the... Read More

  1. by   Rnandsoccermom
    We have computers in the patient rooms and there was a man with a black doorag on his head in a black leather jacket, jeans and black boots at the computer. I said "excuse me, can I help you?" and the MD turned around and just looked at me funny.
  2. by   ERRNTraveler
    Most ER Docs I've come across wear scrubs, but a lot of specialists, when called in after hours, have shown up looking less than professional. I had a neurosurgeon show up in jeans, chaps, and cowboy boots (complete with dried manure on them...), and one GI doc came in wearing scrub pants, a "wife-beater" (for lack of better description) tank top, sunglasses, and a big gold chain with a big 3-inch diamond-encrusted dollar sign hanging from it. The patient actually thought he was a member of the housekeeping staff! Well, at least the patients know what their money is going towards when they pay their bill!
  3. by   caroladybelle
    Because nurses and respiratory therapists are employees of the facility and the facilty can control the attire.

    MDs, as a general rule, are not employees, thus not subject to uniform rules. Though in many places, they are required to wear IDs.

    MDs are also "customers" in that they decide where to send patients, and therefore can increase/decrease income to facilities. Thus hospitals are to a certain extent, reluctant to offend them.

    As an aside, MDs also put in large amounts of time in what should be "off time". The good ones are in the hospital making rounds before office hours/surgery - often at 0500, 0600. They receive emergency calls during lunch or do consults. They may round on admissions, consults after hours or after dinner. They may get consults/admissions/calls into the night. If someone goes bad at 0200 and codes, the good ones (not all) may show up after being called out of bed, at the facility. And if they are covering another MD's patient, this is going above and beyond.

    Am I going to gripe if s/he is wearing bed slippers, shorts or has a few spare wrinkles in their clothes?

    As a nurse, my time when off is my own. Good MDs have very little time "of their own". Much of their "own time" gets sucked up in drama - I'll cut them some slack on the attire.
  4. by   RNOTODAY
    While I would love to show up in shorts and flip flops, I cant, and I know there are reasons. For one, I will be there the whole time, for a shift, with the patients. .Not practical. Second, I am an employee of the hospital... therefore they can tell me what I need to wear. Docs are NOT employees of any hospital, therefore, they have more leeway. Especially surgeons, who spend even less time with the pateints who are a wake and able to see him. He popped in to check on a pt in less than business attire? Who cares??? I think its kinda cool, and a tad bit hot.(thinking of a particular type , mind you lol) But thats just me. I guess my point is, 1) he's not staying the whole shift and providing care, and 2) I always have this philosophy. If I wanted to play by the different rules of ANY profession, I am able bodied and of free will to do so. What I mean by that is, if I wanted to be a MD, I could go to school to be one, and, conversely, if I wanted the no stress no responsibility gig of the cafeteria line workers, I could have chosen to do that as well.
    But, the resp therapists are deffinitely employees of the hospital, and should be dressing as everyone else in their position does. Violations of that are up to the persons supervisor.....I realize I probably made more mad at me than see my point, so I rationalize it with this, and no personal feelings: They (doctors)are not employees of any facility. So, no, they do not need to play by the same rules as the nurses or any other employee at the hospital.
    Last edit by RNOTODAY on May 30, '07 : Reason: typo
  5. by   meandragonbrett
    I totally agree with RNTODAY. Who cares what the docs are wearing and why is it any of our business? RT on the other hand should be conforming to hospital dress code.
  6. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    Pretty much what David said. Doctor's make the hospital money. Everyone else costs them money.
    Yup, a nurse comes with the price of the room, and is an expense. But, try to eliminate that expense, and you dont have a hospital, you have a hotel.
    Like I said before, nursing is a suckers position, and I mean that wholeheartedly. BUT~~~ I did pick this profession, and dont see any changes any time soon!!!!
  7. by   traumaRUs
    This is another case where you pick your battles. There are bigger fish to fry than what the MDs wear.
  8. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from pegbord
    oooops, sorry, I didn't realize that the OP was talking about emergency situations . . . I'm with you Noryn, in emergency event, I'd be pleased to have anyone needed (doc, nurse, RT etc) show up in whatever they were wearing!!

    On top of it this was an emergency???!!!!!
    Oh lord. I just dont have the time or mental hard drive to let these things into my lists of "issues".A nurse, in my opinion, has about 100 other things to worry about re: the state of our profession in this country than what the doctors are wearing at any given time, never mind when they show up for an emergency.....
  9. by   core0
    Quote from ERRNTraveler
    Most ER Docs I've come across wear scrubs, but a lot of specialists, when called in after hours, have shown up looking less than professional. I had a neurosurgeon show up in jeans, chaps, and cowboy boots (complete with dried manure on them...), and one GI doc came in wearing scrub pants, a "wife-beater" (for lack of better description) tank top, sunglasses, and a big gold chain with a big 3-inch diamond-encrusted dollar sign hanging from it. The patient actually thought he was a member of the housekeeping staff! Well, at least the patients know what their money is going towards when they pay their bill!
    I have a friend in CT surgery. One night his doc rushed in for an emergency. He was standing at the bedside when the staff noticed he wasn't wearing any pants.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  10. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from core0
    I have a friend in CT surgery. One night his doc rushed in for an emergency. He was standing at the bedside when the staff noticed he wasn't wearing any pants.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    really????
    I laughed so hard when I read that.... how do you forget pants????!!!!!
  11. by   SuesquatchRN
    I don't permit anyone to treat me rudely, neurosurgeon or cleaner, and I don't treat anyone rudely, either.

    I see no need to fight for the right to be a slob.
  12. by   cardsRN
    well, i have seen a cardiac surgeon operate in jeans in one of our rooms on a saturday night. wow what a doc. i'd have his skills in jeans (or a tutu if he preferred) any night of the week.
    OTOH, it's the open toed shoes that get me. gross. what are you going to step in? what's been on that floor? what could splash on you/fall on you. i'm pretty sure there are OSHA regs about open toes in direct care areas, but i see it time and again from MD's and NP/PA types.
  13. by   core0
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    really????
    I laughed so hard when I read that.... how do you forget pants????!!!!!
    You have to know the guy. Very driven, very technically proficent. Not to socially adept. He got a call and leaped out of bed and came in. At least he was wearing boxers.

    David Carpenter, PA-C

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