What medical term do you dislike the most ? - page 5

I hate when people refer to emesis as "PUKE" ......nasty term ! ________________ Praiser ;)... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from DidiRN
    I'm not talking about the procedure, I'm talking about the term used. And I've watched it being done in the OR myself. No different than any other.
    I completely disagree with it being no different.

    But perhaps you can answer this...many years ago when I did OR, I was told that the OR staff was not allowed to be in the room when the skin was ....ugh, "harvested"....that it was such a graphic procedure that they (the transplant team) would insist regular staff leave the room. They had even told me that the team would actually block the view from the little window some OR doors have where you can peak in...have you ever heard of that? That was many years ago though, was just curious if you or anyone else who does OR nowadays ever heard of such a thing.
    We have a list of 10 employees to be called if the "team" needs more people, and we take turns. Lately they've needed at least two. I scrubbed on one yesterday evening.

    They put a rolling privacy wall in front of both OR doors so that anyone going in or out isn't giving a show to anyone standing outside. Any Windows are covered with blue paper taped over them. This team is very good about dignity preservation and privacy.
  2. by   Ms Kylee
    I can't stand expired or passed away when someone ceases to breathe. They DIED.. they did not expire... milk expires... and what the h*** does pass away really mean? You're not passing anywhere.. the body is still there. And I can't stand the word vomit.... sounds like something that you should clean with. One person I used to work with always said "I'm so upset, I just want to vomit"... Thank you for putting that picture in my mind.... ugh....
  3. by   Ms Kylee
    And calling patients "clients" and "residents'. They're not paying me to take care of them, so they're not a client, and don't get me started on resident... just irks the cr*p outta me...
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from Kylee45
    I can't stand expired or passed away when someone ceases to breathe. They DIED.. they did not expire... milk expires... and what the h*** does pass away really mean? You're not passing anywhere.. the body is still there. And I can't stand the word vomit.... sounds like something that you should clean with. One person I used to work with always said "I'm so upset, I just want to vomit"... Thank you for putting that picture in my mind.... ugh....
    How about "transfered to the eternal care unit"?
  5. by   SaraO'Hara
    "Fresh Frozen Plasma."
  6. by   leslymill
    Transitional Unit.......
    They are mostly vent dependent, DNRs. (veggies, another one I hate)
    I feel like I am transfering them to heaven in a slow code way.
  7. by   angel_prias
    I don't feel comfy referring to patients as clients and customers.
  8. by   Treat et Street
    UUUUHH --- OOOPS.
  9. by   rn undisclosed name
    I also don't like the word expired.

    I'm not a big fan of congestive heart failure either. Patients can freak out when they hear that. If there is "any" indication the pt may have chf we have to start the teaching. So, if there is a cxr and it says enlarged heart we are doing the teaching. An elevated BNP - bam some more teaching.
  10. by   tvccrn
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Everytime I read the word "chyme" I feel like gagging. It's the only medical-related word I've ever seen that gets to me.
    I had to look this one up, I have never heard it in use anywhere I have worked.
  11. by   SuesquatchRN
    digital fecal disimpaction
  12. by   EmmaG
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Everytime I read the word "chyme" I feel like gagging. It's the only medical-related word I've ever seen that gets to me.
    Bezoar.

    At least chyme is food.
  13. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from tvccrn
    I had to look this one up, I have never heard it in use anywhere I have worked.
    I'm in my last semester of pre-reqs. I keep reading this word in my Medical Nutrition class. Good to know it's not used in the clinical setting!

    My text's definition for chyme includes the words "soupy" and "sludge-like" for the liquid mixture of undigested food in the stomach.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Oct 8, '07

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