What is your most valuable piece of advice? - page 2

I thought that this would be interesting. As we have new graduates beginning to orient in our respective units, do any of you have any fool-proof pieces of advice for them? If you could only give... Read More

  1. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by moonshadeau
    have very broad shoulders and a stash of Xanax (prescribed of course)
    ...A little too close to the truth...there...:chuckle
  2. by   oramar
    If a patient says "that is not my medication", even if he/she does not protest but gets a funny look on their face, check and double check.
  3. by   NurseMonkey
    I can't say it enough......

    DON'T SWEAT THE PETTY STUFF, DON'T PET THE SWEATY STUFF!
  4. by   live4today
    Treat your patients and staff like you would want to be treated.

    "Good, better, best...never let it rest, until your good is better, and your better BEST!" -- unknown :kiss
  5. by   ceecel.dee
    Listen to your patients. If they say "I'm dying", believe them!

    Trust your instincts. No order for VS Q hour, do them anyway!

    Look at (and touch) your patients. Assessment skills are vital!

    Rise above the inevitable "nurses station talk" that is irrelevent to your job performance. Just nod your head (you don't want to be indifferent to coworkers) with understanding and do care about coworkers, but remember......"I'm here to care for patients".
  6. by   jayna
    ALWAYS ASK QUESTION IF YOU NOT SURE.........to the junior nurses.

    Now go home and take a rest, because you really need one.

    Once some of a buddies are called to the matrons office, I will say I got tissues here if you like. Not a good one but that's how we reassure each other at times.
  7. by   JillyT
    Thank you for all of your valuable ~ * Words of Wisdom * ~ everyone. I'm a fledgling nursing student, looking to absorb as much as I can...to be the best nurse that I can.
  8. by   susanmary
    1. Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry "A man's gotta know his limitations." Really applicable in life and in nursing. You can only do so much. You will not know everything -- know when to question. If you don't know something, find someone who does.

    2. Pick your battles.

    3. Be kind to yourself ... and others (sometimes this is very difficult.)

    4. Stand up for yourself.

    5. Enjoy your life. Nursing is stressful -- but it should NOT be your entire life. When it "takes over" -- time to refocus -- take a few days off/step back & have some fun. Life is too short.
  9. by   SICU Queen
    Always make sure you have a good IV access on those patients that are ordered to have one. Flush it YOURSELF at the beginning of your shift. More times than I care to mention I've responded to a code and found that the patient's IV is non-functional.
  10. by   canoehead
    If you think something is not quite right investigate it until you find the problem, or you find whatever made you stop and think.

    Always double check meds if the patient questions you. And always tell them what you are giving them as you hand them the pill.

    Come up with a solution before you go to someone with a problem, even if it is a stupid solution they will know you are trying to improve the situation, and not just kvetching.

    The best way to get a child to stay still for an IV or IM shot- explain the whole thing to them, and then say they can yell as loud as they want to but they need to help you by staying as still as they can.

    If they have to poop but can't, they're probably gonna code.
    If they say they can't breathe, they need immediate help.
    If a family member says "they've been getting worse all day" they are always right.
    If a pregnant woman says "I gotta PUSH! ... UGH! " get her back to bed, and put on your catcher's mitt.

    If you have to float, just having someone who is willing and spends time looking for ways to help out makes a big difference, you don't necessarily have to take an assignment, especially if you've no experience in that unit.
  11. by   mother/babyRN
    All wonderful advice and oh so true. I would add that it isn't a mistake until you repeat it... Otherwise, it's a valuable lesson...
  12. by   mother/babyRN
    In OB, if the mother tells you the baby is coming and EVEN if you just checked her and that seems impossible, THE BABY IS COMING! Mother is usually right....
  13. by   debbyed
    :angel2: Always treat your patients in the same manner you would want your children/parents treated

    Always treat your co-workers the way you want to be treated. (even on their bad days, because you'll have bad days too)

    Always...ALWAYS...trust your gut.


    After 20+ years in Emerency Nursing I have found these 3 always to be true.


    Debbye

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