What is your Nursing Super Power? - page 2

Inspired by the 'Super Senses' thread, and the hilarious responses..... What is your nursing super power? Mine is making babies poop. Especially constipated NICU babies on high-cal formula.... Read More

  1. by   soutthpaw
    I think the nursing and parenting super powers are really listening to that gut feeling that tells you something is wrong even though you can't put your finger on it. I have learned to always listen to my gut feeling over anything else. it's never steered me wrong.
  2. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from kconrad1712
    I'm not sure if this counts, but I consider my super power to be NOT slapping the sh*t out of someone who says, "You're going into nursing. Can you look at this rash on my ____ and tell me what it is?" LOL
    Keep that super power sharp, you will need it after becoming a nurse too!
  3. by   WereBadger
    My superpower is in mentoring/ orienting new nurses and precepting nursing students. I genuinely love learning, teaching and being a resource for people who need a colleague to rely on. I'm also a psych nurse, so building rapport and getting to know people 'where they are' is big for me.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    My nursing super power was getting confused, agitated patients to calm down without drugs or restraints. I remember the time when I was even able to make a combative, demented gentleman stop fighting my staff by sitting down next to him and talking to him about "the rules" in a soft voice...he responded by patting my shoulder and even smiling for the first time since being admitted to the LTC. After that he was less agitated, though I sometimes had to remind him that certain behaviors were unacceptable. After that the staff called me the "dementia whisperer". I might add that I have never been hit or kicked by a patient. I had a tele monitor thrown at me and I have been cursed roundly, but never physically attacked.
  5. by   Elizabeth777
    Mine is calming the cranky chronic/genetic babes. A little snuggling and a lot of butt patting and they're good as gold for the rest of my shift. I've got a soft spot for those babies, so I tend to get them fairly often.
  6. by   Davey Do
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    staff called me the "dementia whisperer".
    It's not a superpower, however it is a portion of my charming personality that I am known as "The Don Juan of Dementia" and the "Geriatric Gigolo".

    No, I would never cross that sacred boundary of professionalism, even though one lady stated, during an intervention for hygienic measures due bladder and bowel incontinence, "You're just tryin' to get into my Depends"!
  7. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from Davey Do
    Would making incontinent geriatric Patients poop be counted? If so, I'm there with you, adventure_rn!


    Ah gee, adventure_rn, answering that question will mean I have to talk positively about myself.

    Well... alright, then:

    I believe I have a nursing superpower in talking down acting out psychotic Patients. A couple of recent examples:

    An acting out ex-con schizophrenic threatened two female staff members, saying he was going to kill them. I had him follow me into the room used for seclusions, and got him to take two po prn meds of Vistaril 25mg and Zyprexa 10mg.

    One of the female staff members called for Security to come to the unit. When the Patient saw the two Men in uniform, he went ballistic. I requested that they stay out of sight and they monitored the seclusion room from the nurses station by video.

    Within a half an hour, the Patient was able to have a discourse with me, had committed to safety, and apologized to the female Staff.

    Another time recently, the Adult Male Unit called a Code Green, as a big 20 something year old Patient was threatening to "F--- everybody up!" I asked the RN on the unit, who had syringes of Haldol and Ativan for a chemical restraint ready, if I could talk with the Patient. In a matter of minutes, the Patient committed to safety and agreed to follow staff's directions. No other intervention was necessary that night.

    However, the next day, both chemical and mechanical restraints needed to be used on the Patient.

    Yep. Talking down psychotic acting our Patients is my nursing superpower.

    Speaking of superpowers, I know a Doctor who said he could perform miracles:

    miracle-jpg
    Right there with you Davey - I have this ability to talk down the most aggressive psychotic patient's. It's said at the facility where I work that I can talk birds out of trees.

    Hppy
  8. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from AvaRose
    Is it a superpower to somehow always get all the L2K patients on the floor on any given shift? If I don't end up crazy myself one of these days then maybe I should just consider a move to Psych nursing...on second thought if I can get Nursery or NICU then I'll just have crazy families not crazy patients. Last night was the best combo, all 3 L2Ks and all of them plus 2 of my other 3 patients were on Special Contact Precautions for CDIFF.
    I'm sorry what does L2K stand for?

    Hppy
  9. by   SilleLu
    Getting complicated discharges done. The patient that has been medically stable for weeks, doctor are willing to write discharge orders, but difficulty getting patient placed somewhere? Gone on my shift. The challenging patient that keeps coming up with new issues so they don't get discharged? Gone. The difficult patient everyone just can't deal with anymore? yup, them too. The patient whose family is out at the nurse's station 10 times before you even get report? Put me on it, I'm the discharge queen!

    Edited to add: all appropriate candidates for discharge of course
    Last edit by SilleLu on Sep 19 : Reason: clarification
  10. by   AvaRose
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    I'm sorry what does L2K stand for?

    Hppy
    Legal 2000. It's the Nevada legal hold designation (due to the fact that the law was passed in 2000). Even more fun is once they are medically cleared the RN has to go with the patient to their tele-psych hearing with the judge to see if they need placement or can go home. So on a day with 3 or more L2Ks I end up turning over the rest of my patients to the charge nurse because I am off the floor in the psych room in the ED for anywhere from 3-5 hours waiting for judges to decide when I can get rid of the crazies.
  11. by   Akinge
    i can look a doctor in the eye and respectfully refuse to comply with an order. especially if it is not in the best interest of the patient. the older i get, the easier it is
  12. by   klmartin08
    Hearing alarms. I can hear the faintest squak at the end of hall or even in other patients rooms. Everyone is always commenting how crazy it is I can hear them so well
  13. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from AvaRose
    Legal 2000. It's the Nevada legal hold designation (due to the fact that the law was passed in 2000). Even more fun is once they are medically cleared the RN has to go with the patient to their tele-psych hearing with the judge to see if they need placement or can go home. So on a day with 3 or more L2Ks I end up turning over the rest of my patients to the charge nurse because I am off the floor in the psych room in the ED for anywhere from 3-5 hours waiting for judges to decide when I can get rid of the crazies.
    This is something I had not heard of. In California they are all 72 hour holds and shipped from the ED to a appropriate psych facility (my facility) as soon as a bed can be found. We don't do hearings on psych holds until 2 days after the 14 day hold is in place. I only do the hearings if the patients are adolescents. Otherwise they are done by LCSWs.

    Hppy

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