Wearing gloves with HIV positive patients - page 4

(First time writing here) Yesterday during my clinical, I was interviewing a HIV positive patient. Half way through, the primary nurse asked me to talk with her in the hall, and when we spoke she... Read More

  1. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from OldDude
    Totally agree...if such "standards" existed as described above, we'd all have to wear gloves to go to the restroom; you know, to protect our self from our self...you never know.

    I'm sure this is gonna bring a scolding, but I don't wear gloves when giving injections...
    I don't wear gloves for injections, either. Applying counter-pressure to the injection site with the alcohol swab before removing the needle seals it up fairly well. I think gloves are over-used and often used as substitutes for handwashing, which they shouldn't be.
  2. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from TriciaJ
    I think gloves are over-used and often used as substitutes for handwashing, which they shouldn't be.
    ^ This! While doing infection control, I do preach about (APPROPRIATE) glove use, but I have to stress to so many people that it is not, never has been, and never will be a substitute for good ol' soap and water (plus hand sanitizer where appropriate, of course). Especially in my facility, because a lot of patients associate seeing staff put gloves on with behavioral emergency codes (as staff usually glove up when they arrive because of the likelihood that we'll be going hands-on and exposed to bodily fluids).
  3. by   /username
    Your coworker is incorrect.
  4. by   rearviewmirror
    What is wrong with wanting to wear gloves? When I was in the ED, there were lots of people from the hood, so there would be lots of scabies, lice, etc issues and that include their belongings. It appears that most here disagree with the preceptor because by wearing gloves, one way or another, you are "discriminating," which is a big no no now days, and hurting someone's feelings or what have you. Just narrowing down someone's desire to wear gloves whatever the situation be into either ignorance and fear seems pretty narrow-minded to me too.

    I didn't study infectious disease or science of contagion or disease but at the end of the day, it's my safety and well-being and my family that is at stake. I am not denying the humanity of HIV patients, or any patients as I would treat them the same as someone with different disease, as I would wear gloves into all rooms. And if THAT offends yal...... oh well, I shrug and go on my day.
  5. by   OldDude
    Quote from TriciaJ
    I don't wear gloves for injections, either. Applying counter-pressure to the injection site with the alcohol swab before removing the needle seals it up fairly well. I think gloves are over-used and often used as substitutes for handwashing, which they shouldn't be.
    Amen...plus I give most of my injections to infants and toddlers, vastus lateralus, I pin both knees to the bed with one hand and I inject, toss the syringe aside, and apply the bandaid with the other hand. Gloves are bulky, slippery, stick to the bandaid, and a general encumbrance.
  6. by   ElvishDNP
    If you don't want to contract HIV from your patients, don't have sex with them, share tattoo or IV drug needles with them, or transfuse yourself with their blood. If you don't do those things, you will be fine.

    Furthermore, the CDC's most recent statement suggests that if the pt's viral load is undetectable, then they really can't transmit HIV.

    Years ago, when I was a brand new nurse, I had a pt whose AV fistula had abscessed. He was HIV+. His fistula ruptured on my shift, and I ran into his room and instinctively slammed my bare hand down on top of the artery shooting blood shooting out of his arm onto the walls and ceiling. He yelled at me to grab gloves, but I wasn't moving my hand, and at that point my hand was already covered in his blood.

    If I didn't get HIV from that, there is no way you will get HIV from a pt interview. The nurse that told you to wear gloves is stupid and wrong, and reeks to me of the phobia we dealt with in the 80s.
  7. by   dudette10
    Quote from ICUman
    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.
    You misunderstood right here.
  8. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from rearviewmirror
    What is wrong with wanting to wear gloves? When I was in the ED, there were lots of people from the hood, so there would be lots of scabies, lice, etc issues and that include their belongings. It appears that most here disagree with the preceptor because by wearing gloves, one way or another, you are "discriminating," which is a big no no now days, and hurting someone's feelings or what have you. Just narrowing down someone's desire to wear gloves whatever the situation be into either ignorance and fear seems pretty narrow-minded to me too.

    I didn't study infectious disease or science of contagion or disease but at the end of the day, it's my safety and well-being and my family that is at stake. I am not denying the humanity of HIV patients, or any patients as I would treat them the same as someone with different disease, as I would wear gloves into all rooms. And if THAT offends yal...... oh well, I shrug and go on my day.
    If you're working in a busy ED where you never know what you're going to be exposed to, then it makes sense to just wear gloves as a matter of course. That's different from a regular nursing floor where you have a chance to know your patients and your interventions are generally planned.
  9. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from ElvishDNP
    If you don't want to contract HIV from your patients, don't have sex with them, share tattoo or IV drug needles with them, or transfuse yourself with their blood. If you don't do those things, you will be fine.
    I'm going to start using this in my HIV trainings.
  10. by   RotorRunner
    Quote from ICUman
    Wearing gloves will not make a patient "feel like crap" or feel bad about themselves. It is an everyday common practice in the hospital.

    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.

    Instructing a student to wear gloves does not make the nurse paranoid or ignorant.
    Disagree with this. You are perfectly entitled to wear gloves every time you enter a patient room, but that is not standard precautions.

    I only wear gloves when there is a likelihood of encountering open skin or bodily fluids. Wash your hands before and after all patient contact and there is nothing to be afraid of.

    OP, your nurse was off base.
  11. by   hherrn
    Quote from rearviewmirror
    What is wrong with wanting to wear gloves? When I was in the ED, there were lots of people from the hood, so there would be lots of scabies, lice, etc issues and that include their belongings. It appears that most here disagree with the preceptor because by wearing gloves, one way or another, you are "discriminating," which is a big no no now days, and hurting someone's feelings or what have you. Just narrowing down someone's desire to wear gloves whatever the situation be into either ignorance and fear seems pretty narrow-minded to me too.

    I didn't study infectious disease or science of contagion or disease but at the end of the day, it's my safety and well-being and my family that is at stake. I am not denying the humanity of HIV patients, or any patients as I would treat them the same as someone with different disease, as I would wear gloves into all rooms. And if THAT offends yal...... oh well, I shrug and go on my day.
    I feel like I have completely missed something in this thread.

    People here are not criticizing the preceptor for wearing gloves. Glove are great. I wear them frequently. People are criticizing the preceptor for wearing gloves specifically for known hiv, but not in otherwise similar circumstances. This demonstrates ignorance. (I mean the term literally, not as an insult.)

    If your practice is to always wear gloves, no matter the patient or nature of the contact, great. If you were teaching this to new nurses, it would also be important that you also teach evidence based standards of care.

    BTW- Discrimination has always been bad. That's not a new thing.

    Also- quick question: "I didn't study infectious disease or science of contagion or disease...."
  12. by   klone
    The World Health Organization actually states that gloves should be donned any time "it can be reasonably anticipated that there will be contact with blood or other body fluids, mucous membranes, non-intact skin, or potentially infectious material will occur."

    The World Health Organization does NOT recommend routine donning of gloves for all patient contacts or interactions, as it's a waste of resources, it does NOT contribute to reduction of cross-contamination, it may result in missed opportunities for hand hygiene, and it may result in germ transmission.
  13. by   mushyrn
    I don't wear gloves for fear of contracting HIV in situations like this, however, I usually wear gloves when touching anything in the patient room. Just because I have seen patients do some nasty things/have nasty things done in their rooms and I don't want to be touching that.

    I also bleach everything, haha.

    But no, not because of an incorrect HIV stigma.

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