Wage Deflation In Nursing - page 2

While recently conducting a Google search on the topic of stagnating and deflating wages in the healthcare sector, I honestly did not unearth much scholarly information on the topic. However, many... Read More

  1. by   CrunchRN
    Yep. The employers are very lucky.
  2. by   kcmylorn
    Time will tell how lucky these nursing employers are.

    Think about it, if your were a new grad, who can't get a jov because no one will put out the money to orient you for your profession and you had major student loan bills due 6 month post graduation, would you hang around in a dead end profession? Waiting for the preverbial economy to turn around, which economists and other analysts say won't be for another 5 years, and the predictors of the nursing job outlook to look to inprove in the year 2020.? That's 8 years from now- By that time, how much orienting and residency programs do one thinks that going to take- that 2012 new grad could have done 2 more 4 year cycles in a BSN program for god sakes.


    How many people are going to hang around waiting for 8 years for job? Then when you think about all the bad media that is going to creat, who is going to want to invest their money, take out loans for nursing education.

    How many nurses are going to seek costly advanced degrees to be paid peanuts. Nurse don't aquire advanced degrees- NP, MSN's and DCS or DNP's to take 7AM nursing report on these moron employers hospital units, to clean poop, give out meds, answer call lights and haggle with the pharm, lab, xray, take crap from the patients, t and the patient's family,.the disrespect from their employers- talked down to like nincompoops about customer service skills, nit picking, manipulated by hair brain Nursing mangers who are kissing corporate butts. So what ever mind altering drugs these hospital CEO's and board of directors are on they best get off of and check into rehab.

    I have had quite afew nurse's with their MSN 's tell me- why do you think I got an MSN, or I didn't get an MSN to wipe butt.

    How many doctors are going to take on these job position- are we going to ask an establish physican to now start drawning their own labs, doing their own EKG's, taking their turn doing night shift inhouse rotations for days on end like that of their residency years, how many lawyers are going to take over the jobmarket and fill positions of paralegals and law clerks. while the MBA's puppeteer and orchestrate the smarter more intelligent professions. Don't tell me it takes high intellect to be a Business major- bookkeeping, accounting, basic math skills- non advanced the math skills of calculus and trig: Oh wait- project management- any stay at home mom or dad,or any kid who has ever planned a party for their friends or who has ever planned a birthday part can project manage. Any one who manages the budget in their own home can budge direct!! Any one with any common sense knows if they have $3,000/month to pay mortgage/rent/ electric/food/car payment and insurance, one can't spend 2500 dollars on new clothes for themself, movie tickets, dinners out and expect to pay the same bills with what's left over. Great intellectual geniuses don't tend to go into business administration-

    Business majors have always been those looking for the easier routes out of a college education, it is the easiest of all the nursing MSN's- it is more difficult, mentally taxing and challenging to take on an NP program, than an administration track. Sorry but it's true.
    In my day- the kids who went into the business majors were the goof offs, those that were not going to sacrifice their social life for the hard sciences. I don't recall any validictorian of any of my kids classes or mine ever being a business major- They were the physics, engineering, medical school bound or nursing majors. Business majors were not the high achievers. they always made fun of the science high achiever crowd and it was mostly because the science kids were so intellectual and studious aka NERDS. Business majors= party animals, easy street, fun seeking. The CEO's are no different. It's me, me, me! and the heck with you,you,you!
  3. by   kcmylorn
    How many students of today are going to persue a nursing career when they can get jobs in the IT- computer world or "green jobs in industry" making $120.000 and up compared to a nursing salary of $30/hr and work as hard as a nurse? My answer- Not many.
    They can need nurses all they want- but if the salary isn't there- tough luck healthcare- let some one else do it.


    consultant to a software company $100,000-$300,000/yr, Nurse $30/hr- wiping butt.!!

    No butts. Just bytes!!!
  4. by   kcmylorn
    I predict- the healthcare systems of this country is going to be employing mostly UAP on these patient units. The licensed nursing is going to go the same way the medical students did- fewer and fewer going into mediine/doctors due to the pay and lawsuits compared to the cost of an education- not worth it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  5. by   tewdles
    Nothing will change r/t nursing wages and work load as long as profit drives our health care system...nothing.
  6. by   BrandonLPN
    Quote from plumbtrician
    Sorry y'all if this sounds like a bitter pill! There is a solution to wage deflation. It's a novel concept called "unionizion"!!!!!! Ever heard of California Nurses Association?
    Hear, hear! I'm in a union and am guaranteed a raise every year. I can't imagine NOT getting
    a raise. How can any employer have the nerve not to reward loyalty and longevity in it's employees?? I'm very pleased in pointing out to my non union RN former coworkers who work in the hospital that I make more than most of them. And most of them have Batchelors degrees. If that's not incentive to unionize, I don't know what is....
  7. by   BrandonLPN
    Quote from kcmylorn
    I predict- the healthcare systems of this country is going to be employing mostly UAP on these patient units. The licensed nursing is going to go the same way the medical students did- fewer and fewer going into mediine/doctors due to the pay and lawsuits compared to the cost of an education- not worth it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    That's what we get for abandoning the RN/LPN team nursing model. Having a RN only primary nurse model was NEVER economically viable. That's why hospitals are crawling with various "techs" now. Mark my words, we're gonna see the creation of such titles as "wound techs", "admission/discharge specialists", "IV techs", UAPs who are "trained" to pass meds. All unlicensed and all working under the RN resulting in the RN taking a much larger pt load in med surg. Have fun....
  8. by   Tragically Hip
    Quote from kcmylorn
    Then when you think about all the bad media that is going to create, who is going to want to invest their money, take out loans for nursing education.
    As long as people's ideas of nursing reflects the reality of 2000, egged on by nursing school marketing, people will line up for their ADNs and BSNs. I'm surprised at how little research people do before committing themselves to 3 to 5 years of intensive studying, and running up a large personal debt.

    Quote from kcmylorn
    How many students of today are going to persue a nursing career when they can get jobs in the IT- computer world or "green jobs in industry" making $120.000 and up compared to a nursing salary of $30/hr and work as hard as a nurse? My answer- Not many.
    They can need nurses all they want- but if the salary isn't there- tough luck healthcare- let some one else do it.


    consultant to a software company $100,000-$300,000/yr, Nurse $30/hr- wiping butt.!!

    No butts. Just bytes!!!
    That is the same kind of fantastical thinking so many people have about nursing careers. A lot of those high-paying jobs have been offshored, and for technical reasons, not as many engineers are needed as use to be the case. There are a lot of disappointed STEM graduates.

    The same kind of games have for a long time been in play in engineering fields as you are citing in nursing, with lots of propaganda about shortages of engineers, which encouraged too many people to get engineering degrees and seek jobs in the "cool" areas. (How many people are needed to create code video games? How many new weapons systems are there going to be as the military budget shrinks?) Beyond that, congress drank the artificial shortage Kool Aid and cranked up the number of H1-B visa recipients to further depress wages. It's a scandal, how much below prevailing wages an H1-B visa holder from a poor country would work for.

    Engineers, though, are an independent lot, and unionization was among the furthest things from their minds.

    In fact, there are probably many, many more hospital administrators (some with degrees in medical fields, most with business degrees) making big bucks than there are high-tech folks making that kind of money. That, long after it has become obvious that an MBA degree is of limited utility, other than as a checkoff item on a resume.

    The problem is, if you're graduating high school and are pondering which career to choose, there are not a lot of good choices right now. While high-tech may be doing well in a few particular areas, and no one knows how things will be four years from now, you still need certain skills for high tech. What would you advise a high school senior to do? It's a difficult question.
    Last edit by Tragically Hip on Aug 9, '12
  9. by   bstullis
    The problem is those with the money usually outlast those without. It usually goes back to a cost/benefit analysis, can they save more by going on and on with litigation until the bank of the opponent is broken or will a "settlement" get them out with less from their coffers.

    Unions may help here, but I have seen more money going to lobbying for the "right law" rather than protecting their union members in most cases. Priorities are mixed up and off base in many arenas of the health care business. Fix those issues and we fix the healthcare money shortage (in my humble opinion)
  10. by   redhead_NURSE98!
    Quote from merlee

    But you can pay someone 20 bucks an hour and hope she knows what she's doing without any long-term staff around, or you can pay me 30 an hour and I can tell you to get the crashcart just by knowing what that cough is moments before the person drowns in their own CHF fluids. Your choice.
    Seriously!!!! I often wonder, do they care about anyone that stays put AT ALL?
  11. by   JBudd
    Not only did I not get a raise, I took a pay cut last contract. Yes, we are union. Our community hospital was bought out by a huge corporation, who brought in 400 nurses ready to take over if we voted strike.

    Our contract was gutted. We are ignored, and the PTB have threatened, in oh so nice language, that no one should ever say anything negative about the corp. on social media. The voice we were to have on the staffing grids has been ignored, with the proviso if we can't come to agreement the CNO gets the final say. We did not strike, preserving the union presence, but crippled. What we did preserve was not getting fired without several steps and warnings, can't just get fired.

    Our staffing ratios have suffered, and we have lost ancillary staff. No daily overtime, only if you go over 40 hours. For we part timers, even picking up extra shifts is not overtime. Staying over is no overtime. Full timers work 3 12's, no overtime for them either, until the magic 40 hours.
  12. by   anotherone
    The area I relocated from for a nursing job was/is one of the largest metro areas in the US. Many new grads left that area for jobs and some hospitals were closing at that time or at least closing some of their units. Some were on hiring/raise freezes for years. One place, with a union, agreed to a 10% pay cut for all employees, the alternative was massive layoffs so the union went with the choice that would be better off economically for most. Most of their veteran employees would have a harder time completely relocating their lives compared to a young new grad. And there wouldn't be anywhere else for them to find jobs in that area as other hospitals were facing similar issues. There are PLENTY of new grads pumped out each year there. No problem finding an employee. Employers know that. Where I am now, there aren't many nursing schools but there aren't many hospitals either and the hospitals know that too. "Lucky to have a job" is one of our managments favorite lines. Raises here are 0-75 cents. Most people get around a quarter.
    I think every area has stayed the same or had wages decrease, not just nursing.
  13. by   ArrowRN
    Quote from kcmylorn
    I have had quite afew nurse's with their MSN 's tell me- why do you think I got an MSN, or I didn't get an MSN to wipe butt.
    Word at the University I'm applying to is that beginning in 2014 MSN programs are going to be phased out and DNP well be the new standard reqiurement, so get your MSN while you can so you can be "gran-fathered in"...else one would be a DNP wiping butt.
    What I don't understand is why students are being asked to spend more on education to come out of nursing school to make less money than their grandmothers made in the same field?



    and this quote

    "That's what we get for abandoning the RN/LPN team nursing model. Having a RN only primary nurse model was NEVER economically viable. That's why hospitals are crawling with various "techs" now. Mark my words, we're gonna see the creation of such titles as "wound techs", "admission/discharge specialists", "IV techs", UAPs who are "trained" to pass meds. All unlicensed and all working under the RN resulting in the RN taking a much larger pt load in med surg. Have fun.... "

    is a scary thought. Just adding "tech" to someone job title could give employers the right to pay like $10/hr

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