'Uniform' Dress Code - page 2

I was prompted to join a nursing forum today so I could research what my employer is implementing as far as a new dress code. Although the committee who drafted this new policy stated that this was... Read More

  1. by   moongirl
    I think you are right, same color- you pick the style, what difference can that possibly make? Some would prefer drawstring, some elastic, some like front pockets, some like a big side pocket on the pants.
    One of the hospitals I rotated thru had surgical in green, OB in purple, the heart people, CCU, ICU in blue. Honestly it was great.
  2. by   meownsmile
    We went through several phases of this. First it was a patterend top with white pants or a specific color pants only. Then people got away from that and were wearing the color for pants with the same color tops. Problem was noone enforced what THEIR own decision was. Then we went to each department having their own color. RT wore red scrub tops/white pants, lab wore blue/white pants, one floor wanted green, one floor wanted ceil. Then they started floating everyone everywhere to fill gaps in the staffing and we all clashed like a bad movie. That went by the wayside.
    And they never gave us any uniform allowance at all.

    Now everyone wears what they want as long as it is clean and non wrinkled. The only problem with that is I still feel there should be some lines drawn. A 85 year old woman with a broken hip doesnt need to be cared for by someone wearing Tweety and Sylvester on their clothes. Sorry but if you like those prints, work pediatrics. There are plenty of patters/colors/flowers that are mature and dont make people feel they are being cared for by their granchilds daycare provider. I know people like to cheer up their patients but somehow i dont think the pediatric prints do it. If we want to be treated as professionals lets start by wearing clothes appropriate for the age patients we are caring for. JMO
  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from jannieannie79
    .... (funny, but I have yet to come across ANY RN, RT, PT, or CNA who does not introduce themselves as such upon entering the room).
    ...From experience, I say that they are full of it.
    I would really like the local news to investigate...even if it is only an internet poll.
    Hi,
    Oh yeah, I certainly known folks who were not nurses refuse to correct patients or anyone else who calls them "Nurse".

    At three of the hospitals I've work at were uniforms color coded, although, only one required the nurses to be color coded too, usually the nurses had free choice on their uniform color.

    I actually got a kick out of my one Nurse coworker who chose to wear the PCT color because it was a "pretty raspberry".

    I am for it, and do not know anyone who felt this was painful or inappropriate, sure a little bit of a crimp in style but, at work, who cares.

    Gen
  4. by   BSNtobe2009
    I don't think having a dress code increases professionalism, however, I firmly believe it increases the visability to patients and I don't think an introduction is enough for most patient's to remember. There are too many people that go in and out of a room, and it's hard to keep track of whom.

    I also think it will help new staff members, doctors, and traveling nurses to recognize who is who when they need assistance or help.

    Housekeeping, I have never understood why they wear scrubs. They are non-medical.
  5. by   jill48
    I have been saying for years that I'm all for the dress code. I think nurses should wear all white. Not that white looks good on me, considering i'm chubby, but I would do it. Now I don't want to offend any CNA's or therapists of any kind, because most of them are awesome; but I am so tired of a family member tellling me "That nurse (while pointing to a CNA/therapist/etc.) told me to do something this way" or "that nurse told me that my mom has a urinary tract infection or something" and just having all these ancillary staff informing people of things they shouldn't be. Plus, I think it would be alot easier for patients, family members, doctors, etc. to know nurses from other staff. I've never worked anywhere where every single person that walked in a patients room announced who they are.
  6. by   MIA-RN1
    I totally agree with the post about wearing age-appropriate scrubs. on postpartum, we can get away with scrubs having babies on them but I don't like seeing cartoon characters either. I have a couple floor-appropriate scrubs like the "Joe Cool" Stork delivering babies and one of babies faces--but mostly I wear solid top. I don't like to think of a patient having a hemmorrhage or FDIU and being cared for by a nurse wearing tinkerbell or garfield.
  7. by   OC_An Khe
    I don't have a problem with a dress code per se, professionals should know how to dress appropriately for the situation. By the way do they have set colors for the MDs? Maybe instead of white lab coats the Surgical residents can wear green, medical residents blue, attending must wear suits (no dresses or skirts) etc. Of course there can be a color code for admin also. Say black for accounting, pin stripes for senior management, oh and secretaries must wear loose fitting slacks.
  8. by   AuntieRN
    At my hospital the nurses wear any combination of port wine, white or port wine and white, the CNAs/Nurse Techs wear a combination of either white and carribean blue or all carribean blue they are not allowed to wear all white...the lab wears ceil blue and white or all ceil blue, resp wears all navy pt wears I think burgundy polo shirts and Kaki pants, the OR team wears purple...the one that gets me though is...housekeeping wears port wine tops and black pants (not scrubs though)...but to me it doesn't appear to make a difference most pts still think whoever walks in their room is their nurse...
    We do not get a uniform allowance from work either. We have to buy our own scrubs. Other then the colors we get to choose what style we want to wear....but we are not allowed to wear prints of any kind it all has to be solid.
    Last edit by AuntieRN on Nov 26, '06 : Reason: had to add another thought
  9. by   barbyann
    Quote from ocankhe
    I don't have a problem with a dress code per se, professionals should know how to dress appropriately for the situation. By the way do they have set colors for the MDs? Maybe instead of white lab coats the Surgical residents can wear green, medical residents blue, attending must wear suits (no dresses or skirts) etc. Of course there can be a color code for admin also. Say black for accounting, pin stripes for senior management, oh and secretaries must wear loose fitting slacks.
    roflmao
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It is one thing to be forced to wear a certain color...quite another to force the same style...and simply RIDICULOUS that we will be forced to buy them from ONE VENDER!:angryfire
    I agree. In nursing school we could only buy our uniforms from one company, and lo and behold that one company didn't carry tall pants. So i got tall pants from another company, but it was an act of Congress to get 'approved' to do that.
  11. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I agree. In nursing school we could only buy our uniforms from one company, and lo and behold that one company didn't carry tall pants. So i got tall pants from another company, but it was an act of Congress to get 'approved' to do that.
    I had the same issue in nursing school as well. Vendor didn't carry tall sizes. And the program director wouldn't let me order the men's style (which would've been long enough- I tried them on!). Nor was I allowed to get them from another source. I ended up with pants four sizes too big so they'd hang down to my ankles- and the crotch came to my knees.

    after a few weeks of this, my clinical instructor asked what was up with my pants. I told her, she rolled her eyes about what I'd been told and said, 'good lord, just get some navy pants that fit and we won't tell anybody!' And of course, nobody ever noticed, including the program director when he saw me in my rule-breaking pants.

    Stupid, isn't it? I concur that the one-vendor thing is highly suspicious. The hospital needs to pay to have the scrubs tailored to fit if that vendor doesn't have scrubs that fit certain employees properly. See if they want to go down THAT road.
  12. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    I am a nursing student who must wear wine colored scrubs and a white jacket, which I have no problem with.

    The problem is that when you go through one vender to provide scrubs it seems to give them permission to charge an arm and a leg for them. We have to go through a particular vender because they are the only ones who have the school patch. It is very hard to get through nursing school as just a torso, as I had to give up my other arm and leg for my books.

    Swtooth
  13. by   traumaRUs
    I don't care for the most part what a provider is wearing. However, I want their nametag at chest height and in big letters and I want them to introduce themselves every single time they come into the room!

    That would make me happy.

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