Too many Negative remarks regarding Nursing School here!! Stop the discouragement!! - page 3

I can already imagine what responses I'll get....But anyway...I and im sure, alot of other people who are pursuing a degree in Nursing are tired of some of the remarks that are made on this site... Read More

  1. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from angel337
    \ venting can be good for your mental health.
    And the overall physical health of those who pi$$ us off.:roll
  2. by   Alexsys
    Everyone's experience was different, but we still have the right to vent about our own experiences. Besides if nursing is what you really want to do, then by all means dont let OUR experiences discourage you
    Last edit by Alexsys on Oct 18, '06
  3. by   leslie :-D
    and when you finally do experience the reality of nsg school, i would hate to read a post from you asking, "why didn't anyone warn me?"

    please be forewarned: if you find these comments discouraging, then you will be relatively 'easy pickins' when you're actually a student.

    so here's to you and your future as a student nurse.
    take a deep breath.......

    leslie
  4. by   weetziebat
    as 'allnurses' sounds, this site is full of nurses, techs, students etc. many of whom have had a rotten shift and need to vent. other nurses, techs and students understand.

    as a nurse with 35 years experience, i can say that imho nursing school was hell. i graduated from the rn program 20 years ago and truthfully from what i hear it has only gotten worse since then. it is hard work and don't let anyone try to tell you otherwise.

    there have been numerous enjoyable moments in my career - almost all having to do with delightful patients, and i've had some wonderful opportunities as a nurse that i probably wouldn't have had otherwise. it hasn't all been awful, and in fact i now have a job i really like.

    but there is no way, if i had it to do over, that i would ever become a nurse. especially in this day and age of patients and families just looking for someone to sue, and outrageous patient loads, which make it dangerous to be a nurse and even more dangerous to be a patient. administration and management who love only the almighty dollar, even at the risk of patient health and wellbeing.

    many times nurses just get more and more piled on their plate till they break down in tears and find another job, or another line of work. i have a friend with a master's degree in nursing who finally threw in the towel, and now works for and far prefers her job in home depot.

    now, you may not want to hear this. yes, it is discouraging. but the truth is the truth, and if you want sunshine i suggest to just read the threads that have to do with current events or humor. like the armed forces, you can go to the recruiters for tales of sunshine and opportunity or you can ask the actual soldiers etc. who are in the trenches. might not like what you hear, but hey, maybe its the truth.

    i'd just suggest you not make assumptions about something you are not even involved in yet, and give a little credit to those of us who are showing up every day to work and putting up with all the crap you don't want to hear about.

    end of my rant.
  5. by   texas_lvn
    op, just curious what your thoughts are. you have over 4 pages of nurses, and other staff supporting you and wishing you well, yet I do not think you have responded. What say you?
  6. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from weetziebat
    i'd just suggest you not make assumptions about something you are not even involved in yet, and give a little credit to those of us who are showing up every day to work and putting up with all the crap you don't want to hear about.

    end of my rant.
    :yeahthat:
  7. by   Wendy_RN
    I am not flaming you in anyway, but I have to agree with the others who have responded. Nursing school is stressful. You cannot imagine what it is like for the student and their family unless you walk in their shoes. It is physically, emotionally, and financially draining for a lot of people. I watched classmates file bankruptcy, divorce, etc. during the time we spent in the program. Some of these same students failed out of the program. No one is trying to discourage you or anyone else from becoming a nurse. I am supportive of anyone who wants to become a nurse. I say go for it and prove all of the discouraging posts wrong. Just know that when you are feeling the same stress as the other students on this site that you do have a place to vent, just as they have done.
  8. by   barbie90210
    [font=book antiqua]ah nursing school! those were the good old days. i remember one clinical instructor who was a former army sargeant. i remember her saying to me "ok - what are the five?". (five rights of med administration). i felt like saluting. it was a religious school and she was trying to convert the catholics to christianity. this didn't go over well and i believe they eventually let her go. she did say to me "you have the potential to be a great nurse" but never stopped riding me. i will never forget another old school instructor. she was maybe 60 - very old school. she said to us "be sure to clean that foley catheter tubing with alcohol after you empty it - you don't want to get urine on the hospital's nice carpets". it was so sweet - i have never forgotten it in 20 years. i had some pretty unpleasant experiences but some of them were because i wasn't really applying myself. i ended up taking boards as a non-grad and then transferring years later to finish my bsn at another school. i remember some good clinical instructors i had. the first im injection i had to give i just kind of "froze". i had the syringe and i was looking at my target body part but couldn't stick the patient. the instructor gently just took my hand and pushed the needle in. i guess some things about nursing school you never forget, do you? the best advice i can give is that many people around you feel like they are drowning but don't want to show it. when you get out in practice remember that even the most unpleasant people have something to teach you. one pretty bad manager i had after my new grad program said something i remember to this day. when trying to find a vein it sometimes helps to make a warm compress. i know you aren't supposed to - but microwave a wet towel or use some hot packs on the arm wrapped in a chux. you can put the arm in a dependent position or inflate a bp cuff instead of using a tourniquet. what she said that was especially useful was "you have to know where there is a vein and where there is not a vein". that was very true. all the time i see people going for veins in hands. of course, you are supposed to start distally and work your way up the arm but an iv in the hand is quite impractical. elderly patients will pull them out and they will easily infiltrate. you have to feel where there is a vein and where there is not a vein - especially on african americans and obese people. people should always shave that site as there is something (rare but true) known as a "hair embolism". many people have contributed to my knowledge base even if they weren't particularly nice. see what you can learn from them - even if they are unpleasant. back to school - participate in study groups, bond together, and things will seem easier even if they aren't! :mortarboard:
  9. by   GregCP, RN
    I've been with my wife for 6 years...no kids. I've come to the conclusion that RN school made me sterile. In additon, my hair started to thin, I've gained weight, and became a borderline alcoholic. OTHER THAN THAT, IT'S BEEN A HELL OF A RIDE! GOOD LUCK IN NURSING SCHOOL! :wink2:
    Last edit by GregCP, RN on Oct 19, '06
  10. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from GregCP, RN
    I've been with my wife for 6 years...no kids. I've come to the conclusion that RN school made me sterile. In additon, my hair started to thin, I've gained weight, and became a borderline alcoholic. OTHER THAN THAT, IT'S BEEN A HELL OF A RIDE! GOOD LUCK IN NURSING SCHOOL! :wink2:
    :roll :roll
  11. by   Antikigirl
    Quote from GregCP, RN
    I've been with my wife for 6 years...no kids. I've come to the conclusion that RN school made me sterile. In additon, my hair started to thin, I've gained weight, and became a borderline alcoholic. OTHER THAN THAT, IT'S BEEN A HELL OF A RIDE! GOOD LUCK IN NURSING SCHOOL! :wink2:
    My hubby agrees fully! LOL!!!!!!!!!

    I know if I talk about RN school, it is typically to help others avoid the situations that I went through that caused probelms. No one can tell you better than someone that has been there, done that! Oh I made my share of things that weren't time managed, tests I screwed up on, clinicals that I was half asleep from studying...been there! But all an all I enjoyed RN school...and will typically say so!

    The first thing I thought when I saw this post was "oh dear, if negativity here seems to be a highlight to some, and upsets certain people...what are they ever going to do once an RN!" You will run into collegues you don't mesh with and are negative, other staff members that will frustrate you, policies at work you don't like, staffing issues, and sorry...but patients are not the most happy bunch of folks with a automatic love of nurses for the most part (hard to be happy when you are ill or stressed).

    I take negativity not as a downer, but as a chance to learn from someone else's frustration and vent, and try to be proactive and positive about it!

    Also, many nurses burn out if all they see is the negativity of their work...trust me, almost got me my third year as an RN. So I had to find the positives whether they were at face value, hidden, or something I mentally had to change within myself. That has made me so much happier in my career choice and I am sticking to it!

    See beyond the negativity that you see, and learn from it . And...I sooooooooo agree with the other posters that so many folks don't have anyone to vent to...that is very difficult in this very emotionally demanding job. I wished it had been here when I was in my blue funk...but I found it soon after and much better for it !
  12. by   Mudwoman
    When I applied for nursing school in Ft Worth, TX in 1992, there were 35 slots and 640 applicants. Going by grade point avg, if you didn't have a 4.0, you didn't get in. I had a 3.8 and didn't get in. So, I went to the hospital LVN school and applied. 30 slots and 413 applicants. We took tests all day long, and the 60 highest scores got an interview. I got in. Out of 30, 21 of us graduated.

    To me.......nursing school was a lot easier than the real world of nursing, and nursing school is one of the hardest things I've ever done.
  13. by   casi
    As a want-to-be nursing student reading the horror stories helps me loads. It gives me a clue of what I'm getting myself into.

    Hopefully nursing school wont be too much of a shock for me.

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