Snow emergency excuse? | allnurses

Snow emergency excuse?

  1. 0 so, here in nyc, we're expecting a big one this weekend. my friend is working tomorrow night, and is anticipating a problem getting in to work already (they're saying it's going to be at it's worst during her commute in).

    so here's my beef: although she is my good friend, she lives 35 miles from work, as do many of the others (some live further than that). i, on the other hand, live about 5 miles away. every winter, i hear about how these people can't get to work because of the snow, or their mother, father, husband or dog will not let them drive in the snow to work. am i the only one who feels that we, as health care professionals, have an obligation to get to work?? and also, isn't this something you need to consider when you decide to take a job that is so far from your home?? now, i'm talking about nyc/long island, where there is a hospital every 5 miles, not the boon docks (where some of you may be). and i'm also not talking about a school nurse job or a doctor's office, where no one would be there anyway if the weather is bad. it's a hospital, where sick people are, and will stay, until they get better.

    i just can't bear to listen to the complaining anymore, especially when i don't agree with their rationale. i can get into an accident on my way in, too. i can't not say anything (i'm just not that type), so i know i'm not going to be popular when i get into work tonight. speaking of tonight, i'm working overnight. so my friend calls me up and says "they might start holding people over before it snows, so you might have to stay". my shift ends at 8 am, and the snow is supposed to begin in the afternoon. i can't imagine that they would hold the entire night shift over in anticipation for a storm.
  2. Visit  ProfRN4 profile page

    About ProfRN4

    ProfRN4 has '19' year(s) of experience. Joined Apr '03; Posts: 2,225; Likes: 1,286.

    76 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  dekatn profile page
    0
    Then again, maybe they will start calling people to come in early, before the snow!!!!!!!! (lame attempt at humor) If co worker is afraid she can't get to work tomorrow, maybe she should consider packing a bag and staying at the hospital or hotel close by.
    Our facility will pay for rooms for staff to stay in at a local hotel when the weather gets that bad.
    I'm with you on this one. if a nurse knows they aren't going to be able to travel in the snow, they should make arrangements ahead of time instead of making it so hard on the ones that did make it in.
  4. Visit  HappyNurse2005 profile page
    0
    im with you. i am not graduating until May, but if it snows i certainly wont expect that i can't show up at work b/c of the snow, bad roads, etc. it does help that i am 5 miles from my door to hospital, but even so-
    i agree with you. the patients need you, snow or not.
  5. Visit  DelightRN profile page
    0
    Where I am, we're definitely considered essential personnel. Sometimes we'll pack a bag and come to work early (as I did during Hurricane Isabel), sometimes we'll stay over indefinitely until other staff members can make it in. Our facilities department will occasionally go out and pick up nurses, if they live a reasonable distance from the hospital.

    Its not what I would call *fun*, but we are extremely well compensated when this happens.
  6. Visit  JenTheRN profile page
    0
    I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan where we get A LOT of snow. People who live here know that we get a lot of snow, or at least they should. I can understand people not wanting to come in for a shift that is not essential (ie, not working on a floor, not taking care of patients, not short-staffing your unit), but if you live where the weather is bad, you know you're gonna have to make some sacrifices. Be that staying at a friend/family member's house who lives closer to your hospital, or staying in a hotel/or at the hospital overnight. As nurses, we have an obligation to our patients and to our units. As we all know, emergencies do come up. But when you know ahead of time that the weather is going to be bad, you need to plan ahead. On the other hand, I don't think that people should be risking thier lives to come to work....but then that ties in to the planning ahead thing-if you plan ahead, you shouldn't have to risk your life in bad weather.

    Is this making any sense or am I rambling? I work in a small hospital, and most of our staff live within 5 or so miles of the hospital. Those who don't, usually do have a back-up plan when it comes to bad weather. We usually don't have a problem with people calling in due to "bad weather".


    PS-This totally doesn't apply to those who live in areas which usually don't get bad winter weather!
  7. Visit  ProfRN4 profile page
    0
    Quote from dekatn
    Then again, maybe they will start calling people to come in early, before the snow!!!!!!!! (lame attempt at humor) If co worker is afraid she can't get to work tomorrow, maybe she should consider packing a bag and staying at the hospital or hotel close by.
    Our facility will pay for rooms for staff to stay in at a local hotel when the weather gets that bad.
    I'm with you on this one. if a nurse knows they aren't going to be able to travel in the snow, they should make arrangements ahead of time instead of making it so hard on the ones that did make it in.
    She thought about that (but asking to be paid if she came in early to avoid the weather). Hopefully there is some kind of plan in effect. They used to go and get people, but they don't seem to do that anymore.
  8. Visit  wam79 profile page
    0
    Not a problem for me where I am now.
    When I lived in CT and we had snow we would
    call and give rides to people who had transportation problems.
    If the storm was a big one a lot of staff would just stay at the hospital.
    We would bring in a bag with a change of clothes ect...
    The hospital supplied a place to rest and free meals during the storm.
  9. Visit  wonderbee profile page
    0
    During the hurricanes down here in Florida, we were required to pack a bag and bring our families if we had to. I would think that snow storms would be no different in that regard.
  10. Visit  Heartman profile page
    0
    Rhode Island winters are typically unpredictable but we do occassionally have significant snow.

    It seems that it has been a matter of pride to get in to the hospital through the worst that mother nature has thrown at us.

    And if you get stuck there, a sort of holiday spirt prevails. The work gets done and we have a good time.

    I guess it's a matter of attitude.

    Heartman
  11. Visit  Mystery5 profile page
    0
    I live a little over 1/2 hour from work. I reside in the Cascades of Washington State. I have a 4WD vehicle. I think it's a neccessity and responsibilty to have a vehicle to get to work and unfair to co-workers to expect them to pick up the slack.

    The same, however, could be said for someone with kids who get sick a lot, or some other situation that causes absenteism.
  12. Visit  kae rn profile page
    0
    I agree with you all. Plan ahead!! I live very close to where I work and I am always there. I would welcome fellow nurses to stay at my house, but of course no one plans on it (It is easier to call off). They just plan on me being there and taking a double load. Of course I always pack extra food, and clothes for while I am there, because mandation is always a possibility. Never mind my kids are home unattended and some mature adult can't plan ahead, yes that makes me a little angry.
  13. Visit  begalli profile page
    0
    Definitely not a good excuse for not showing for work unless the person is snowed in and the roads are closed and, if this is the case and they know ahead of time that this may be a possibility, they need to make arrangements that will enable them to be there.

    In the event of a major disaster we are required to report to work. A major disaster around here would be an earthquake. Of course we wouldn't just leave our family unsecured, but we are still requried to report. During a major earthquake, the phones are not working properly, that's why the plan is to show up. If you're not needed, you're sent home.

    For me, this is a hard because I'm also part of my city's emergency response team. But work has to come first.

    So I really don't see what the difference is between snow and possible dangerous roads following an earthquake (not to mention dangerous buildings).

    I agree with you. I feel healthcare professionals are obligated to show up unless it is a detriment to the health or well-being of the individual.
  14. Visit  Nurse Ratched profile page
    0
    Some of my hospital co-workers are horrendous about planning ahead - honestly I wonder what cave they are living in to apparently NOT hear that inclement weather is on the way. Some fail to leave any extra time to slow down on the roads and arrive late, best case scenario. Others do simply call off.

    In a major recent storm, the hospital powers-that-be apparently told ALL hospital administrative personnel that they had to be on the job - weather was not an excuse and those who thought they couldn't drive in it could call and would be picked up and brought in. The attitude from the top was it's kind of hard to get your front line people in when the generals aren't even there.

    The house super also had at her disposal a number of 4 wheel drives to go out and fetch folks who were using weather as a reason not to come in. Only problem was they tried to back out on the implied other end of the bargain - getting same folks HOME at the end of the shift. Understandable carrying-on ensued and four wheelers somehow appeared to tote staff home. One nurse volunteered to come in from an outpatient affiliate to help out for four hours, and then was mandated to stay another four, "because there's no one else." Mind you, she had already worked 8 hours before she got in.

    Bottom line, there needs to be better planning from both top and bottom.

    I was pleased to see that mgt was pressured to be there (altho lord knows, keep 'em off the floor; at least at my facility they're more harm than help lol.)


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