Snow emergency excuse? - page 2

so, here in nyc, we're expecting a big one this weekend. my friend is working tomorrow night, and is anticipating a problem getting in to work already (they're saying it's going to be at it's worst... Read More

  1. by   z's playa
    Quote from begalli
    Definitely not a good excuse for not showing for work unless the person is snowed in and the roads are closed and, if this is the case and they know ahead of time that this may be a possibility, they need to make arrangements that will enable them to be there.

    In the event of a major disaster we are required to report to work. A major disaster around here would be an earthquake. Of course we wouldn't just leave our family unsecured, but we are still requried to report. During a major earthquake, the phones are not working properly, that's why the plan is to show up. If you're not needed, you're sent home.

    For me, this is a hard because I'm also part of my city's emergency response team. But work has to come first.

    So I really don't see what the difference is between snow and possible dangerous roads following an earthquake (not to mention dangerous buildings).

    I agree with you. I feel healthcare professionals are obligated to show up unless it is a detriment to the health or well-being of the individual.

    So you're saying that after a major earthquake, buildings have fallen down in to the street, bridges have collapsed, water pipes a burst eveywhere..and begalli has manged to get into work dispite all odds....through chaos and mayhem...you could actually be sent home after you got there?...To go through that treacherous journey again?

    I'm sorry..the mental picture made me laugh. but yes I do see how you need to be there in an emergency. It is a hospital after all. :chuckle
  2. by   begalli
    I know z, crazy eh? But you know what, it's okay, earthquakes big enough to cause problems like that are rare, rare, rare. (finding wood to knock on).

    It's never happened (wood again) but what would end up happening is that many many people would be trapped in their area and unable to show up. So the people who do make it in more than likey will be used and not sent home. Guaranteed.

    I will simply put on my cape, spin around a couple of times and be there in no time flat. No problem.
  3. by   kae rn
    I think it is great that you respond, snow doesn't get these responses. People just don't answer their phones if you call,.....Maybe there should be a better snow policy, like you should call in during a Level 2 emergency or ......
  4. by   boulergirl
    Oh boy, doncha just LOVE those snow emergencies! UGH!

    "I can't come in to work cuz I can't get out of my driveway." Well, then, you should have salted the driveway or parked on the street. I had a co-worker who told me she couldn't understand these people from the South who don't know how to drive in snow and ice. She came from Chicago, where you learn to travel in it on a normal basis.
    Here in Georgia, if there's rumor that a flake of snow might fall, they break out the salt trucks and snow plows, and it's all they talk about on the news. And of course, there's the obligatory camera footage of people in the supermarket stocking up on milk and bread.
  5. by   ragingmomster
    The last really bad storm I was working for the county jail. The sherrif called on his friends in emergency management and many of the staff caught rides down the highway with plows. When the plow we were in hit the end of it's section of the highway, we just sat and waited for the next crew to meet up with us and go the next section.

    We also stayed over in a nearby hotel and were carted back in the next morning.

    What fun! :stone
  6. by   BittyBabyGrower
    I have called in 2x in 18 years for snow. If it is way too horrible and the highways are closed then I wouldn't go. Our hospital sees how many people call in due to weather and if it is a certain percentage then it is declared a snow day and we don't accumlate sick points.

    Only fools, nurses and policemen go out in bad weather

    Oh and one of the times I called in I couldn't even get off our street to the main street....there were drifts up to the windows and even my big truck couldn't get thru.
  7. by   z's playa
    Quote from boulergirl
    Oh boy, doncha just LOVE those snow emergencies! UGH!

    "I can't come in to work cuz I can't get out of my driveway." Well, then, you should have salted the driveway or parked on the street. I had a co-worker who told me she couldn't understand these people from the South who don't know how to drive in snow and ice. She came from Chicago, where you learn to travel in it on a normal basis.
    Here in Georgia, if there's rumor that a flake of snow might fall, they break out the salt trucks and snow plows, and it's all they talk about on the news. And of course, there's the obligatory camera footage of people in the supermarket stocking up on milk and bread.

    Regarding the comment on "you should have salted the driveway or parked in the street."

    It gets so freaking cold here that salt....is redered useless. We get so much snow all at once....the salt is just buried. As for the street parking...there are many by-laws that say your car will be towed during the winter because the snow plows plow the road at night and if your car is there it hinders the work. they don't have time to go around it. And I guess the desire to plow THROUGH your car is too great to bear so they just tow it. :chuckle

    As for getting out of the driveway AFTER these snow plows have plowed the road? Well...30 cm of snow.....plowing road for 2 blocks...it gets p-r-e-t-t-y high at the sides of the road...basically making it impossible to get out without a snow plow of your own..and if its mixed with ice? Well forget it. We're talking boulders!!!!!!!

    So there are many people who call in for a snow emergency including shutting down schools and actually telling people to stay home from work.

    gotta love a snow day!!!!!!!
  8. by   dolphinRN
    In the past 10 years, I have lived more than 20 miles away from the hospital where I work and both houses have been down the hill from the only way out of the neighborhood. I drive a car, not an SUV, and have always made it in to work. The strange thing is, all of us that live further out seem to make it in without any problems. The ones that call in are the ones that live within 5 miles of the hospital. Figure THAT one out.

    When we are expecting bad weather, the hospital does allow those that want to stay over to do so. Staff are also reminded that until enough of the next shift shows they are not to leave.
  9. by   boulergirl
    Regarding the comment on "you should have salted the driveway or parked in the street."

    It gets so freaking cold here that salt....is redered useless. We get so much snow all at once....the salt is just buried. As for the street parking...there are many by-laws that say your car will be towed during the winter because the snow plows plow the road at night and if your car is there it hinders the work. they don't have time to go around it. And I guess the desire to plow THROUGH your car is too great to bear so they just tow it. :chuckle

    As for getting out of the driveway AFTER these snow plows have plowed the road? Well...30 cm of snow.....plowing road for 2 blocks...it gets p-r-e-t-t-y high at the sides of the road...basically making it impossible to get out without a snow plow of your own..and if its mixed with ice? Well forget it. We're talking boulders!!!!!!!

    So there are many people who call in for a snow emergency including shutting down schools and actually telling people to stay home from work.

    gotta love a snow day!!!!!!!
    You brought up some good points! Hard to argue with those...
  10. by   CoffeeRTC
    Depending on what area you live in that excuse might work.
    My fav is "I cant drive in the snow...I'm afraid to drive in the snow..etc."
    How about having someone drive you? It is your responsibility to get to work. This is coming from staff that live less than 5 mile some within a mile!! That's what God gave us feet for (these are young and health staff!)

    Last year..seven mo pregnant working a 3-11 I packed a bag...just new I would have to stay over.
    A few years ago our maintance man would pick the local girls up..no excuses with his 4X4!

    I already got my call to come in today! Not sure if I will yet :uhoh21:
    Hey my mail man is here already...
  11. by   doobiedo
    I was one of those that always lived within 5 miles of work and never missed a day due to snow (and also ticked by folks who lived even closer calling out let alone the ones who lived greater then 20 miles away who couldn't come in!!)...but then again I don't mind driving in snow...it's the other idiots I am concerned about! the ones who drive like the roads are dry and don't allow enough car lengths between them in case someone slides or stops fast...

    I was driven in by a National guard hummer one year and a jeep another year ...hospital got me in but I was on my own getting home the next day!...left a real bad taste in my mouth after that.....I stayed overnight once in a LTC facility in a bed that had just been vacated because of death. (not real pleasant for me)... but in over 20 years in the hospital I don't remember ever once even a meal or any kind of compensation in return from the facility in appreciation......just another reason I left it all behind.....:>)
  12. by   LPN1974
    Well, I live in Arkansas, and we are not prepared for even the least little bit of snow or ice.
    They usually start sanding the streets if it even looks like snow or ice.
    Just a thin sheet of ice or a couple days of snow even has schools letting out for the duration of it. We have alot of rural areas, so alot of people who work at my facility do live 35 and 40 miles away.
    My facility has the policy that CRITICAL care personnel MUST be on the job. NO excuses.
    That means, nurses, dietary, cna's, and some kind of maintenance department coverage, etc.
    I have known of nurses in my department coming in well before the bad weather hits and spending the nights there, right thru the storm, until the roads were clear enough to get back out on their days off.
    I live just about 7 or 8 miles away and I usually do not have to spend the night at work. I just drive it. I agree that 8 miles is no comparison to 35 or 40, but as you say, you knew this when you took the job.
    I don't feel it's fair to expect the ones who live the closest to provide all the coverage while the ones who live further out to stay home until roads are passable.
    In fact on my shift alone, I am the only one who lives as close as I do. The other nurses all live about 35 to 40 miles away. So how could I provide all the coverage? Impossible. They just might as well pack that suitcase and come on, cause one person can't do it.
    My facility helps all they can...they will provide a van to pick people up and bring them to work in the worst snowstorms, and then take them back home.
    And if they don't want to stay on the job, there are motels fairly close and I'm sure the facility would provide transportation there and back. It's just a fact of life if you work where I do.
  13. by   Antikigirl
    Now I live in a place that rarely snows, and when it does snow it usually melts fast leaving black ice. That is how it always is...we are rain country and come cold...we tend to turn icy (happens maybe once or twice a year...short spans like a day or two)...and I live in a very rural area where that pretty much shuts you down because of all the dirt roads and hills (pretty hard to drive on without killing yourself in ice conditions...which again...are rare so we are not accustomed to driving in it, or the Department of Transportation isn't as quick to respond with sanding out here!).

    What I did is I was an eagle eye when it came to the weather reports, and had a room set aside at my facility for me to stay in. If the ice started falling or even snow (we had freezing rain..oh goodie), I would get to work the moment that hit and get there and stay. I had to work the weekend it happened and was the ONLY nurse that could!

    Luckily for me the majority of the probelm had its icy boarder 10 miles east of me! WHEW...I was able to get to/from work just fine! My neck of the woods was barely hit. Where as the rest of the east of me...OUCH they got pelted!!

    I had two other back up plans...knowing folks that can drive in snow, and I felt comfortable with their driving on ice too.

    I let my employer know I was doing all this, they proably thought I was overdoing it..but I let them know after last years bad snow/ice storm we got (that one was 5 days..again we are NOT use to this huh?)...I was going to do my best to get there no matter what! And that is exactly what I intended to do...if I had to call in...it was because of something I couldn't control past all my plans!

    However, I don't believe that risking your life in icy or snowy conditions is worth it at all! I can get another job, but I will have a harder time getting a new car or wow...a new body part or life if the risk of driving came to a sad conclusion!

    Some people have more driving skills than others, some come from areas where they have learned to drive in this, some people are calmer drivers and don't overcorrect, and many other factors. I happened to be a person who ONLY started driving at 28 because of nursing school...I can't drive in these conditions nor do I want to because I will suffer an accident (seirously..even my hubby hates driving with me!!!!!). I would be one of those folks to try and wind up hurting myself and someone else! Best I stay off the roads for safety.

    So if someone says they can't make it in due to snow or ice, your facility should have a gameplan for these conditions to cover. It isn't worth a persons life trying to get to work in conditions that even the police and department of transportation say 'don't drive in this!'.

    I work for a living, but my work doesn't rule my life! Best to be prepared and plan for times like this..but bottom line, you can't make it in bad weather, you call in! Hey, I would tell a patient this wouldn't I...I better listen too!

    Also, as others have mentioned, some places consider snow/ice emergencies...this can be so true, especially when the state government and EMS agencies say not to drive! At that point...sorry to say, who gets called in emergency situations to help a facility??? Yep, the ones closest to the facility (like in power outages, fires, and other emergencies where personal are needed to help get patients out or housed). So if you live close...sorry...just like us that live outside..you chose that! I have had to do my share too...always coming in to cover because I lived the closest for many years! Now I don't...but at least I try really hard!!!!!!! (I am a planner anyway...I always plan for things like this! I would love to make a good living planning for emergencies!!!!! I am very good at it!).
    Last edit by Antikigirl on Jan 22, '05

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