Should I quit? Idk what to do!

  1. I've been an RN for two years. I've worked two jobs since then. I'm stuck in a dilemma and don't know what to do.

    Okay so my full time job is in critical care, 2 miles from my house making a little over $26 an hour base plus differentials so in total I get $30 on a weekday and $32 on a weekend. I love what I do but the department keeps getting worse and worse d/t management and we are always short staffed. I have worked at this hospital for a total of 5 years (I was an aide before becoming an RN). I get about 6 weeks pto, but I'm only allowed to use 2 weeks per department policy. The rest we have to use if we call off or we can cash in. I'm almost done with my BSN and our tuition reimbursement is $5250 a year.

    My second job is my contingent job at a small county hospital in a geriatric, behavioral unit. I also pick up in med surg and icu if needed. This hospital is small and most people get shipped out to the hospital where I work full time if they have anything remotely serious going on. Even it's something like PN or a NSTEMI because they don't have a cardiologist or pulmonologist on staff.

    So at the second job I was offered a ft position in the behavioral unit. My base pay would be $23 an hour with differentials. So I'd make about $27 on a weekday and about $30 on a weekend. It's 20 miles from my house, but I could stay with my mom cause she lives near by if I need to. I'd start out with only 2 weeks PTO, get sick pay and my tuition reimbursement would be $1000. It's state retirement and slightly better insurance. Staffing is always great. It's rare to work understaffed there.

    What would you do? Thanks for reading!
    Last edit by vc01ca on Oct 11
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    I would ask myself what my long-term goals were and act according to that.
  4. by   not.done.yet
    I think it sounds like apples and oranges and you have to decide what you really want, then go from there. Best of luck!
  5. by   vc01ca
    Thanks for the replies. My family think it's crazy to leave a job farther away for less money. But then the folks I work with at the full time job think I'm crazy for not jumping at the opportunity. Our unit at my full time job has really gone down hill and we have a lot of people leaving d/t all the changes with management. Basically it boils down to I know I'd be happier at the second job, but I'd also not make as much.
  6. by   chelsea8886
    I agree with acting on your long term goals. I was in a similar situation- loved what I did at one job but management was horrible and we were usually understaffed and stressed. Currently my job isn't as satisfying but I can't complain since management is so wonderful. I do miss my old job though simply for the more skilled nursing. Best of luck!
  7. by   NurseSpeedy
    Unless your dealing with management that doesn't have a high turnover (I've seen so many different sets of leaders at several places that I've worked over the years it's crazy) I wouldn't leave a job just because management is a pain. In time they tend to weed themselves out and then you have a new manager...a year or so later another new manager. Some will be great, some indifferent, and some the devil reincarnated. My point is, a great manager may make it worth staying at a crappy job but a bad one should not be the main reason for leaving.

    The other facility may be great now...and with some really bad luck your old manager could one day be your boss again (I have had this happen-it stinks).

    These are two totally different fields. Which one do you see yourself wanting to work in another 20 years? That would be the one I would go for.
  8. by   Mulan
    State retirement, better insurance, great staffing (less stress) vs shorter drive, more money, bad management, short staffing (more stress).

    May have more money in the future with state retirement, better insurance.

    Money isn't everything, neither is a shorter drive.
  9. by   OCNRN63
    I don't know how old you are, but a job that offers state retirement benefits? That's almost unheard of.
  10. by   vc01ca
    I'm 35 years old. Yeah, the retirement benefits are great. Not many hospitals offer it. As far as long term goals as some of you asked, I'm not totally sure. I want to get my BSN, which I'm almost done with. I thought of the idea of getting a masters at some point, which I have no idea in what. I figured at some point in my later career I end up at the second job because the stress is less, but I was thinking more like when I was in my 50s. Ugh! Decisions! Lol
  11. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from vc01ca
    Thanks for the replies. My family think it's crazy to leave a job farther away for less money. But then the folks I work with at the full time job think I'm crazy for not jumping at the opportunity. Our unit at my full time job has really gone down hill and we have a lot of people leaving d/t all the changes with management. Basically it boils down to I know I'd be happier at the second job, but I'd also not make as much.
    A few more bucks an hour is NOT worth the problems with job one.

    State retirement and better insurance makes this decision a no brainer.
  12. by   Mulan
    Why not switch, full time at the second job and contingent at the critical care job, best of both.
  13. by   Crush
    Money isn't everything but in the long run you have to weight out the benefits versus any burdens in your choice. I think you've received some good advise so far here. Best wishes.
  14. by   FolksBtrippin
    I can tell you really want to make the switch to the behavioral unit. I think you should do it. If you can, stay per diem at the other place.

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