should I mention this in an interview?

  1. Hello all, thanks for any input in advance.

    I have one year left in my RN program and so I am starting to think about when I apply for RN positions. One of the standard interview questions that I have heard is "Why nursing?" Well, when I was 5 y/o I had a kidney transplant and basically spent a ton of time in the hospital. I kinda got hooked on anything medical and the patient care aspect. Also, I loved my nurses....they were so awesome. This is my honest answer of why I chose nursing. However, I'm wondering if this is something I should even mention in an interview. Obviously, if I'm interviewing I want the job, and the last thing I want is to be turned away from a position I want because of mentioning this. If I were to get the job I would for sure let the nurse manager know about it but am just not sure if I should mention it in an interview or not if that question comes up. What do you think?
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   Jay-Jay
    Difficult question, 1NAmyllion. I would be concerned about them not wanting to hire you in case you had medical problems as a result of the transplant.

    My best friend became a nurse as a result of having a kidney transplant. She was diabetic, and after over 20 years with the transplant, passed away in her sleep from heart disease. She did, however, have many good years as a nurse before that happened.
  4. by   DoubleblessedRN
    I don't think it would be appropriate to mention the specific illness or numerous hospitalizations, but maybe you could say something like "The nurses who once cared for me when I was hospitalized at a young age were wonderful and..." (or something to that effect) or maybe use a family member as an example instead of yourself. Good Luck!
  5. by   scribblerpnp
    Personally, I wouldn't mention your kidney transplant unless you have specific needs such as can only lift so often or so many pounds, etc. There is nothing wrong with saying you were in the hospital quite a few times as a child and the nurses were great, etc. The interviewer can't ask you why you were in the hospital. But they may ask you to give specific examples, explain yourself more fully, etc, just remain vague with a focus on the nursing care and not your illness. I just think it is about your privacy in the end. They don't need to know why you were in the hospital, but if it had such an impact on you that you wanted to be a nurse, you can definately express that. It may not matter either way, but no one is perfect and there is always the possibility that it might affect their decision. You may miss out on the perfect job because someone may feel you wouldn't be able to do your job.

    Maybe there are some nurse managers, etc out there who have any ideas of a better way to handle this?
  6. by   TazziRN
    I agree, I would not mention the transplant unless asked, but definitely mention the care you received.

    And I'm glad you're doing well. My dad is 9 years post transplant, so I have a special place in my heart for donors and recipients.
  7. by   iHeartNICU
    Thanks for all your responses. I'm really glad I asked because the answer seems to be a resounding "no." I guess I'll have to think of a way to say I had some wonderful experiences w/ nurses w/o mentioning me or numerous hospitilizations. Thanks again.
  8. by   CHATSDALE
    maybe just say that you have wanted to be a nurse since you were a child

    don't know if the rest is not overkill
  9. by   TazziRN
    Nothing wrong with making it personal, that you had a wonderful experience with nurses and want to join the ranks because you admired them so much, but leave the transplant out of it. If you make it too personal you could risk not being hired because of a pre-existing medical condition.
    Last edit by TazziRN on Nov 17, '06 : Reason: incomplete
  10. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from 1NAmyllion
    Hello all, thanks for any input in advance.

    I have one year left in my RN program and so I am starting to think about when I apply for RN positions. One of the standard interview questions that I have heard is "Why nursing?" Well, when I was 5 y/o I had a kidney transplant and basically spent a ton of time in the hospital. I kinda got hooked on anything medical and the patient care aspect. Also, I loved my nurses....they were so awesome. This is my honest answer of why I chose nursing. However, I'm wondering if this is something I should even mention in an interview. Obviously, if I'm interviewing I want the job, and the last thing I want is to be turned away from a position I want because of mentioning this. If I were to get the job I would for sure let the nurse manager know about it but am just not sure if I should mention it in an interview or not if that question comes up. What do you think?
    Yes, you should disclose this. I am a liver recipient and second career nurse. If anything, it makes you a better candidate for the job because you have "been on the other side of the bed" and have more empathy for the patient due to your experiences.

    The only disadvantage is that some managers will pick up the clue that you are immunosuppressed. I tell them - hey, that's what standard precautions are for.

    Good luck!
  11. by   BSNtobe2009
    I wouldn't mention that it was YOU, even though it is the truth. You can say, "Someone close to me...". It's still the truth, but sounds better.

    It's sad that there are so many judgemental people in the world, but there are, and I would hate to see a wonderful, talented graduate not get a job for even one assumption that may go through someone's mind.
  12. by   P_RN
    I worked with a man who became a nurse because he had been in a terrible accident and admired the Nurses greatly.

    He had one leg about 6" shorter than the other. He walked fine with a slight limp and wore a built up shoe. He said he never mentioned it and the subject never came up in the interview. After he was hired he proved to be such a good worker that no one thought twice.
    I agree with the others who say don't get too specific. You've wanted to be a nurse since childhood should be sufficient.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    You can always say you received excellent care from nurses in the past without getting into fine detail.
  14. by   SeanyRN
    I would mention it, be proud of it. It made you who you are.

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