School's Voluntary Withdrawal From NLN? - page 2

There are a number of Florida public colleges granting the BSN scheduled for "Voluntary Withdrawal in June 2004" on the NLN Accreditation schedule. The definition states that the schools have... Read More

  1. by   BabyRN2Be
    The big, very expensive, private university around here has a clause in it's catalog that actually states that students completing the program may not be eligible for sitting for the state boards. The program (a BSN one at that) has a reputation of not producing the brightest crayons in the box. No, I'm not opening a can of worms because I want to get a BSN, it's just that this university is ~$15K a semester. I wouldn't want to spend all that money and not be eligible to sit for boards. :uhoh21:
  2. by   TopCat1234
    Quote from kristinww
    it depends on the state - some states require multiple accreditation, some do not. i spoke to the national board. that explains the huge dropout of the big universities. i feel better!
    i bet being accredited by the nln costs more than the ccne. so if your state only requires one accreditation, why not go for the less expensive one?

    and be careful on this description of "accreditation". there is "accreditation" by one of the six regional councils that accredit institutions of higher learning and then there is the "accreditation" by one or more of the nursing councils.

    topcat
  3. by   alcala19801982
    BSN programs around the country will be switching to CCNE because it's a higher body of accreditation than the NLN. ASN programs will be NLN accredited.
  4. by   KristinWW
    Quote from alcala19801982
    BSN programs around the country will be switching to CCNE because it's a higher body of accreditation than the NLN. ASN programs will be NLN accredited.
    But suppose your program has NEITHER? I called the State Board and gave them the name of the school, and they verified that I would be eligible to sit now, but I wonder about the school. This is a very large university and they are currently building a new nursing wing, so they can't be going away.
  5. by   KristinWW
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    The big, very expensive, private university around here has a clause in it's catalog that actually states that students completing the program may not be eligible for sitting for the state boards. The program (a BSN one at that) has a reputation of not producing the brightest crayons in the box. No, I'm not opening a can of worms because I want to get a BSN, it's just that this university is ~$15K a semester. I wouldn't want to spend all that money and not be eligible to sit for boards. :uhoh21:
    Sound like your "around here" is the same as mine, except our private school has a much better program and better reputation for its nursing program than the other. The private also has the highest NCLEX pass rates; my current school has one of the lowest.
  6. by   RNKITTY04
    I am in a ASN program. My school does not have NLN accreditation. It was explained to us by the director of our program that NLN accreditation is very expensive and that our school decided not to renew their license.
    I will be sitting for NCLEX in Sept, and if I choose I can move anywhere I want.


    These are FACTS. Believe it or not. End of story.

    Sorry if I sound harsh but I have been over and over this with a local community college and I just wish people would get their facts straight before spreading panic and false information.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Anyone worried over eligibility for testing and licensure would be well-advised to check with his/her state board of nursing about its requirements regarding things such as accreditation of schools. And, anyone planning on advancing his/her education would be smart to consider the university(ies) he/she plans on doing this with as well, to see how THEY work with those about coming to them with a non-accredited degree in nursing. JMO.
  8. by   BadBird
    It is my understanding that NLN accredited schools have a stricter/harder curriculem and have more credits per class so when you want to go on for your BSN all your credits transfer. An example is a NLN accredited college required chemistry labs and 4 credits where others don't, many BSN programs require those labs or they won't take your credits.
  9. by   mayberry
    OK...I'm lost. What does CCNE stand for exactly? My opinion of the NLN, as low as any opinion can be, is the pits. The "tests" offered by this organization are vague, and on a good day pitiful. The questions they ask are from very unit specific areas (IE oncology, ob/delivery) and not from areas where more nurses are. So...my point, if you are going to offer "standardized tests" than make your tests more "standardized". Furthermore, my other gripe with the NLN test..more often than not there are 2 right answers to your questions....how about more specific questions with ONE right answer. My point, your tests S..k!!!

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