RN bashing - page 5

I don't know about the rest of you RNs, but I'm sick of seeing all the posts where we are being bashed by those who aren't one. When I joined here, I actually thought it was a place for nurses to... Read More

  1. by   MassLPN2005
    I am starting an LPN nursing program this fall. I have heard "Oh you are only going to be an LPN?" so many times. First of all, all of the RN school were full with long waiting lists. I have pre- req's with a 4.0. This shool is all day every day, a ten month program. It was extremely competitive to get in. It has a 100% pass rate for the boards. I plan on going straight to my RN this was the quickest and best way as an adult for me to do it.

    But then again... why do I even have to explain myself? Has being an LPN become shameful somehow? I am remebering that the nurse that inspired me as a sick little girl to want to become a nurse was a LPN.

    Nurses have come so far. RN's have so much responsibility. LPN's do a lot of very important real nursing. We all have come such a long way. Lets have pride in and support each other. Oh and btw... I am a CNA now and I am a member of the health care team, an integreal one, but not a nurse. When I am a nurse, an LPN, please don't lump me in with the CNA's I find that insulting.
  2. by   RN34TX
    MassLPN2005 I hope you weren't talking about me when you said "Please don't lump me in with the CNA's I find that insulting." If so I apologize.
    LPN's are licensed healthcare professionals with responsibilities and scope of practice that clearly sets them apart from the CNA.
    I was only referring to the strained relationship between RN's and others in the healthcare environment, particularly CNA's and LPN's as these two categories work very closely with RN's.
    I like to brag to people in other fields that nursing has different levels that people can choose to start or stop at and you don't have to have a bachelors degree to be a part of it. Many other professions cannot say that.
    It should be looked at as a career ladder, not a hierarchy.
    I also started as an LPN due to the long waiting lists at RN programs. It can be very discouraging and I also heard all of the "your only going to be an LPN" crap, much of which came from people who never went to college at all!! What is that about?
    As far as shameful goes, becoming the best LPN that you can be is noble, not shameful.
    Being an RN who barely graduated by the grace of god with poor clinical and people skills who rely on their degree and title to back up their arrogance and hide their lack of knowledge, now THAT'S shameful.
  3. by   MassLPN2005
    Quote from RN34TX
    MassLPN2005 I hope you weren't talking about me when you said "Please don't lump me in with the CNA's I find that insulting." If so I apologize.
    LPN's are licensed healthcare professionals with responsibilities and scope of practice that clearly sets them apart from the CNA.
    I was only referring to the strained relationship between RN's and others in the healthcare environment, particularly CNA's and LPN's as these two categories work very closely with RN's.
    I like to brag to people in other fields that nursing has different levels that people can choose to start or stop at and you don't have to have a bachelors degree to be a part of it. Many other professions cannot say that.
    It should be looked at as a career ladder, not a hierarchy.
    I also started as an LPN due to the long waiting lists at RN programs. It can be very discouraging and I also heard all of the "your only going to be an LPN" crap, much of which came from people who never went to college at all!! What is that about?

    As far as shameful goes, becoming the best LPN that you can be is noble, not shameful.
    Being an RN who barely graduated by the grace of god with poor clinical and people skills who rely on their degree and title to back up their arrogance and hide their lack of knowledge, now THAT'S shameful.
    No I wasnt talking about you at all.
    Sorry if it seemed that way because you had the last post. :uhoh21: It just seems like LPNs get lumped in with CNAs by a lot of people...more "civilians" than professionals. I wish everyone were more educated as to what an LPN is and isn't yes, a real nurse, no not an RN.
  4. by   mattsmom81
    I was an LPN before I was an RN. I was a good nurse then and I'm a good nurse now.

    I remember 'a few' bad attitudes among the RN's I worked with, but I sensed MOST of them were sincerely trying to compliment/encourage me when they asked if I was going on to be a RN. The message I heard (again, from MOST) was there would be more opportunities, better pay, AND I was sharp enough to cut it in RN school. I chose to not let the vocal, bad attitude minority influence my goals or my attitude.

    If someone is chastising an LPN about not returning to school, why not simply state its not a priority in their life right now, but they appreciate the encouragement? That's what I say when someone implies I 'should' get my BSN-MSN.
  5. by   Angela Mac
    Quote from fnp2b
    i also believe that everyone is important, but i believe in levels of importance. the lpn that just changed the sheets for a patient is not as important (notice i said not as..they are still important) as the md that has to go into the family room to tell the family that the patient that the lpn has just changed the sheets for has just been diagnosed with malignant cancer.
    it also falls into the level of responsibility. i have said this before and i will say it again. rn's are not paid considerably more than lpn's because society has it out for lpn's. it is simply due to the fact that rn's have a greater level of education than lpn's and they have a greater level of responsibility than lpn's, so in reflection they are of greater importance...(not saying that lpn's are not important because they are and if you want to be technical so are the cafeteria personnel) every one in a hospitial is important. from the janitor to the ceo of the hospital, there are just different levels of importance.

    "its never to let to be what you might have been"
    you have so much to say.....becuase you are an rn student, you publically bash nurses who know what the workplace is like and have been there since you were still in high school. if you don't have the experience to comment, refrain from doing so......oh, by the way, a nurse with experience is valued more than one who is booksmart.....you have alot yet to learn.
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I was an LPN before I was an RN. I was a good nurse then and I'm a good nurse now.

    I remember 'a few' bad attitudes among the RN's I worked with, but I sensed MOST of them were sincerely trying to compliment/encourage me when they asked if I was going on to be a RN. The message I heard (again, from MOST) was there would be more opportunities, better pay, AND I was sharp enough to cut it in RN school. I chose to not let the vocal, bad attitude minority influence my goals or my attitude.

    If someone is chastising an LPN about not returning to school, why not simply state its not a priority in their life right now, but they appreciate the encouragement? That's what I say when someone implies I 'should' get my BSN-MSN.

    One of our secretaries and CNA's are starting LPN school in the fall. I asked one of them if they were considering continuing on the RN school, and she said she hadn't thought about it. What I said to her was "you really should think about it....blah blah blah." I asked her if she could tell the difference between what the LPN floor nurses and the RN floor nurses did. She couldn't and I said the difference was $200.00/week.

    She could have gotten all sensitive and called me a snooty arrogant RN and I don't care. I think without encouragement and gentle cheering on people they might not realize their potential, or feel they are good enough. When I say to a LPN "you should get your RN" it's a compliment. Not that RNs are smarter or better, but the LPN I'm talking to has what it takes to tough out school and that they deserve that $200.00/week.

    All that person has to say is "No, LPN is my one and only goal right now." I'm sure it gets tiresome though have people tell you to get your RN all the time. But sometimes the reasoning is sincere. I'd hate to think of my favorite secretary and CNA not getting all they deserve.
  7. by   nursebedlam
    Medical dominance is really not my thing. I don't respect dominance in the work place or anywhere else. I love being a RN.
  8. by   Rhoresmith
    fnp2b all i can say to you is [sigh] in my 20 years of being in and out of medicine the rn's i met like you were the ones that burned out fast because they are on their own. if you go in to a hospital and have that attitude what lpn, cna is going to do anything extra to help you. who is going to cover your back ? all the book education in the world will not make up for the years of hands on education these other team members have. you go in with that attitude about how much more you make and guess what you better be the best da** nurse out there cause you are going to find you will get no one to back you up. i have seen this with many new grads and even some rn's that have been around a little (notice that word little) while. in defense of new nurses (rn and lpn) most are willing to listen to the veterans and realize that in nursing experiance is worth more than any book out there
    hope you grow up and realize this before you start working (yes i brought age in because ask any nursing instructor life experiance in nursing is a big big plus)

    rhonda future lpn and very proud of it
  9. by   SCRN1
    This is how I feel also.
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    One of our secretaries and CNA's are starting LPN school in the fall. I asked one of them if they were considering continuing on the RN school, and she said she hadn't thought about it. What I said to her was "you really should think about it....blah blah blah." I asked her if she could tell the difference between what the LPN floor nurses and the RN floor nurses did. She couldn't and I said the difference was $200.00/week.

    She could have gotten all sensitive and called me a snooty arrogant RN and I don't care. I think without encouragement and gentle cheering on people they might not realize their potential, or feel they are good enough. When I say to a LPN "you should get your RN" it's a compliment. Not that RNs are smarter or better, but the LPN I'm talking to has what it takes to tough out school and that they deserve that $200.00/week.

    All that person has to say is "No, LPN is my one and only goal right now." I'm sure it gets tiresome though have people tell you to get your RN all the time. But sometimes the reasoning is sincere. I'd hate to think of my favorite secretary and CNA not getting all they deserve.
  10. by   Angela Mac
    the LPN you are still continuing to bash--me--did not say that I deserve as much money as the RNs....you either took my comments out of text, or you lack good reading comprehension skills. I am not insecure as you keep ranting about. I am a medical professional, I am a good wife and mother of 3 wonderful kids: one of which is in his second year of med school. I am a published novelist and awarded prize poet......insecure? do you even know the meaning of the term? As I said before- don't bash nurses- if you have not witnessed or experienced anything in the workplace- you have not seen an LPN perform the same duties as an RN, in your eyes, we are all bedmakers....enough already, get a grip boy------I hope FNP2B does not stand for future nurse practitioner- because baby- you do not have what it takes........
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jun 18, '04 : Reason: Removing edited material
  11. by   Rhoresmith
    you didnt read what I said, the money you put in big bold letters what you thought you would be making, and it is the attitude I read in most of your post you ARE NOT A NURSE EITHER just a student also. I will be an RN as a matter of fact I want to get a masters and either be a nurse practioner or a nursing instructor BUT I had to get into the program that I was accepted into first and I worked my but off 17 crdt hours first semester all A and B's (after being out of school 25 yrs and working TWO JOBS and having 2 teenage children one with Chronic Migraines) then in the summer where 6 is considered full time I took 7 crdt hours one being A& P I which was a 16 week class in 8 weeks and I made an A and an English class that I had to write 2 research papers in got an A and then first semester of nursing program took A &P II and full load of nursing classes and got B's in nursing and sorry to say C in A&P, in this time my only two brothers were both deployed in Iraq and my dad had open heart surgery and we bought another house and move over Christmas break... and then spring semester was my first semester with just 12 crdt hours ever.......plus I am a student senator. NOW what I was saying is YES when you get out on the floor there WILL BE AN LPN WHO KNOWS AS MUCH AS YOU MAYBE NOT BOOKWISE BUT EXPERIANCE WISE yes she/he will.and I have been a hospice worker a Respiratory therapist and a CNA, never had the money to go to school was busy raising 3 children so yes I have 20+ years in medicine in many different settings
    and it is MRS to you !!!!!!!!!!!
    Last edit by Rhoresmith on Jun 18, '04
  12. by   Angela Mac
    Rhoresmith---please don't let his ignorance upset you. He does not have a clue and is in for a rude awakening.....like you said.......he will burnout quickly.......it won't take much for him to upset the physicians.....and besides.....he may not even pass his boards.....so let him rant & rave, I swear that he gets off on pushing our buttons. You are an intelligent woman, it is people like FNP2B that give the nursing profession a bad image. I wrote a little quote that is appropriate- ONE ON AN EGO TRIP DOES NOT TRAVEL FAR.......good luck & may you have a wonderful future
  13. by   Rhoresmith
    Thank you !!! but sometimes I read and read and then HAVE to reply !!!! would like to have a crystal ball and look into his future hahahaha

    Rhonda

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