Retirement "Gift"

  1. A friend I graduated with recently retired after devoting 32 years to a local hospital in the OR.
    Her gift on her retirement: a small folding canvass chair
    also a year long fight to get 60% of the value of her ESLB.

    Any wonder there is no loyalty or longevity left in nursing?
    What a wonderful example for the new nurses, stick it out here and you get "a chair" to collapse in after all the years of bodily abuse!
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   RGN1
    That is just UNBELIEVABLE!!!!
  4. by   mvanz9999
    LOL! Sorry, that's kind of funny. "Here's your chair!" After 32 years of standing, please sit.

    I do think this happens in a lot of fields outside nursing though. If I were to work at this place for 32 years, I'd get a 6-inch tall plexiglass trophy that says "Thank you for 32 years of service". The End.
  5. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from rck213
    A friend I graduated with recently retired after devoting 32 years to a local hospital in the OR.
    Her gift on her retirement: a small folding canvass chair
    also a year long fight to get 60% of the value of her ESLB.

    Any wonder there is no loyalty or longevity left in nursing?
    What a wonderful example for the new nurses, stick it out here and you get "a chair" to collapse in after all the years of bodily abuse!
    Wow, that's pretty crummy. I think she would have been better off not getting a "gift" at all. A folding canvas chair? Sounds like something you'd get for free for signing up for a magazine.

    RWS: Sorry for any spelling errors.
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Wow, that's bad. You'd think that after 35 years! she deserved something expensive.

    Like this... and it's not like it cost an arm and a leg, either. Geez, you'd think her coworkers would've chipped in!!

    http://www.nursesstationcatalog.com/...html?t_q=CJ724

  7. by   CHATSDALE
    ptb believe that nurses are as inchangable as cogs in a machine

    what ever happen to so and so?

    who??
  8. by   casualjim
    After 21 years in the military here's what I scored:
    -a medal that I can never wear anymore
    -a photocopy of a letter with a facsimile signature of a president that I didnt vote for
    - A piece of cake that I had to pay for.
    It's ok though, I threw myself a ginormous party.
    aloha
    Jim
  9. by   mvanz9999
    LOL! Sorry...

    See this is why I said it's not just nursing. It happens to pretty much everyone except the CEO's of Disney, Boeing, etc.
  10. by   Lacie
    Quote from casualjim
    After 21 years in the military here's what I scored:
    -a medal that I can never wear anymore
    -a photocopy of a letter with a facsimile signature of a president that I didnt vote for
    - A piece of cake that I had to pay for.
    It's ok though, I threw myself a ginormous party.
    aloha
    Jim
    LMAO, I didnt get cake Oh, it took 10 years later that I sent for my military records and when recieved noted I had been awarded 2 medals that I didnt even know about nor physically recieved lol.

    In regards to the nursing retirement, I think I would have had to laugh and tell admin to keep it as I'm sure they were wearing out thier chairs on thier duffs while she was bustin hers. I worked for Humana for years and every 5 years we got a pin with a stone accompanied with a thank you for service. Be curious to know what they did after 20???
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    Problem with longevity in Nursing is we've survived the revolving door of HR professionals within a facility who are the keyholders of "years of employment" records and responsible for identifying long term employees and awards. Managers also hold responsibility for acknowledgement too.

    One of my part-time staff (16hrs week) was a 10+ year employee who retired from FT status year before I became manager. Performing license check review, realized she was licensed in 1955 (3 months after I was born), therefore would be practicing FIFTY YEARS in 1995. When discussing with HR response was "we don't do anything formal after they retire, beyond acknowledging part time service every 5 yrs".
    Met with VP Patient Services and informed her I WAS going to make sure that during Nurse Week /Colleague Celebration nurse was being acknowledged. VP heartily agreed to what I proposed:
    • Got proclamation from House Representatives
    • Newspaper article written
    • Piece published in Advance for Nurses
    • Contacted local TV station
    • Poster display honoring all agency nurses and totaled years of nursing experience: over 1,200 years amongst staff
    When TV cameraman showed up, flustered the CEO who presented a Lenox vase on behalf of homecare agency. DH taped the evening news cast for the 30 seconds of fame. Great buzz in community, positive PR and good spirits through our agency.

    HR learned an important lesson regarding reward and recognition.
    I now get to participate in planning each years events.

    P.S.: Got Pizza banned from this years service recognition event too.

    Have planned 2 other staff retirement partys (both continue with me part time). Always look to Nursing Station as place to purchase gifts.

    One received: as they collect stamps.



    Other person received throw as always cold:
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Oct 7, '06
  12. by   mamason
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Problem with longevity in Nursing is we've survived the revolving door of HR professionals within a facility who are the keyholders of "years of employment" records and responsible for identifying long term employees and awards. Managers also hold responsibility for acknowledgement too.

    One of my part-time staff (16hrs week) was a 10+ year employee who retired from FT status year before I became manager. Performing license check review, realized she was licensed in 1955 (3 months after I was born), therefore would be practicing FIFTY YEARS in 1995. When discussing with HR response was "we don't do anything formal after they retire, beyond acknowledging part time service every 5 yrs".
    Met with VP Patient Services and informed her I WAS going to make sure that during Nurse Week /Colleague Celebration nurse was being acknowledged. VP heartily agreed to what I proposed:
    • Got proclamation from House Representatives
    • Newspaper article written
    • Piece published in Advance for Nurses
    • Contacted local TV station
    • Poster display honoring all agency nurses and totaled years of nursing experience: over 1,200 years amongst staff
    When TV cameraman showed up, flustered the CEO who presented a Lenox vase on behalf of homecare agency. DH taped the evening news cast for the 30 seconds of fame. Great buzz in community, positive PR and good spirits through our agency.

    HR learned an important lesson regarding reward and recognition.
    I now get to participate in planning each years events.

    P.S.: Got Pizza banned from this years service recognition event too.

    Have planned 2 other staff retirement partys (both continue with me part time). Always look to Nursing Station as place to purchase gifts.

    One received: as they collect stamps.



    Other person received throw as always cold:
    VERY NICE. The chair thingy seemed so...insensitive.
  13. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    P.S.: Got Pizza banned from this years service recognition event too.



    BRAVO!!! Especially for that!!!
  14. by   ArmyMSN
    Quote from casualjim
    After 21 years in the military here's what I scored:
    -a medal that I can never wear anymore
    -a photocopy of a letter with a facsimile signature of a president that I didnt vote for
    - A piece of cake that I had to pay for.
    It's ok though, I threw myself a ginormous party.
    aloha
    Jim
    Yeah, but your retirement pay for the rest of your life ain't bad. And the medal - some soldiers are proud to earn that.

    But the canvas chair? - that's pretty sad. I would have left it behind but thanks them for the thought. We nurses accept all kinds of junk/trinkets for "Nurse's Week" - a flashlight key chain was among the cheapest crap pawned off on us. I got a kick how some of the nurses were so happy to get their keychain. Only in nursing. No physician would accept that stuff.
    Last edit by ArmyMSN on Oct 7, '06

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