Recognizing Your Nurses - page 2

“To fully engage employees and make them feel like they want to push the company forward just like the CEO, they need to be recognized. Humans have this need to be recognized and when they are, they... Read More

  1. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from Libby1987
    To above posters:

    I think OP was referring to middle managers who can only do so much to recognize staff. Can you credit a middle manager who hits the floor with you and makes an effort to give praise or recognition, as does OPs managers?

    Or does the executive management's budget for staffing really negate everything that a supportive manager does for their staff/unit? Should the middle manager just give up efforts to show appreciation?
    It costs nothing to back up your staff. It costs nothing to encourage safe clinical care over pandering to unreasonable people. It costs nothing to fight for better staffing...it might be a futile fight, but at least staff knows she tried. I for one would appreciate a push for better staffing even if we don't get it.

    Most of the practices I appreciate my manager so much for are doable by anyone. It's just that a lot of managers wouldn't. Can't have bad customer service scores ya know...so just ask how high when a family says "Jump."
  2. by   Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    Quote from RegularNurse
    I prefer to be recognized monetarily.
    Fair enough...wouldn't we all. But in reality with only so much of the much frequently discussed "budget" to go around - our efforts are usually not recognized with a large bonus (if only). Money is great, but when that's not available some type of recognition feels better than getting neither.
  3. by   Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    Quote from Libby1987
    I think everyone realizes that, but your previous post dismissed the OPs ideas for middle managers doing their part.

    I would rather support OP's effort into writing and submitting suggestions (for a part of the picture) then to respond with a "yeah but".
    Thanks for your comments and support. I'm a new writer to the site and putting your ideas out there can be a little intimidating. Going through the comments is a whole other story.

    I have worked on many units where there was absolutely no attention paid to recognition - and honestly I didn't even know what I was missing until I got it. I'm well aware that we would all love more money instead of praise, but that's usually not a possibility. So, when middle management does go out of their way to show appreciation in ways they can, I take it for what it's worth and know they are trying.
  4. by   Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    I work under who I call the Ernest Shackleton of nurse managers. She supports us when conflict arises, be it with families or attending physicians. She encourages us to call security if at any moment we feel unsafe or even uncomfortable -- she recognizes that a verbally abusive family member is going to distract us from patient care. Not just physically aggressive ones. She has fought and been granted more staff during budget planning, even permission to hire during a hiring freeze. And get this: when we are critically understaffed, she and the assistant manager work the unit.

    Don't get me wrong, I love cookies. Especially when there are many of them. But how I feel appreciated is -- to use the Shackleton reference again -- to have a leader who will get in a tiny boat and row through the treacherous Antarctic oceans to help her staff. Not one who tells us to be Nurse, Waitress, Concierge, Diplomat, and Professional Gluteus Maximus Kisser...that we will like it...now have a cookie.
    Agree with a lot of what you said, especially about having a leader who is willing to paddle upstream for their unit. Many managers are not willing to work the floor - or simply do not possess the skills to do so. I've worked under a few managers who had no experience in the field they were hired as a manager in to. A leader who stands up for the team (instead of just telling them who to be, how to act and how much grief to take) deserves recognition just as much as her team does.
  5. by   Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    Quote from WKShadowRN
    Fair enough. I did imply there is value in it, but I feel more value and a better investment is to invest in employees through support.
    There is a lot of truth to that - support is key. Maybe I did not express my thoughts well, but that is exactly what I feel my current manager provides. Her availability, willingness to help on the floor and small gestures all convey an overwhelming sense of support and appreciation. We all know that many management styles exist (and with your support in an area I have never been in - management) I appreciate your feedback. What I do know is that every unit is different and it's certainly not a one size fits all. Yes, promoting a culture of safety is imperative. Why is a culture of gratitude any less important? Can they not coexist?
  6. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    I'll admit that the management team of my unit do occasionally do things to prop up morale, such as making waffles for breakfast for the team on duty (very rare occurrence), and once in awhile send out an email commending us for our hard work. But those emails seem mildly patronizing to me, because for every one of those, we get a dozen or more telling us what we're doing wrong, and manifold more "we're desperate for staff of both shifts for the next week" ones. Our physician group will bring in pizza on Fridays and pastries on Saturdays (for some of the staff) but only for the day shift. Our managers do not come out of their offices to help when the unit is falling apart, mainly because they can't do what we do - they don't know how - but also partly because they've got more important things to do. The only time this changes is in the event of a mass casualty, because they know we're going to get blow-back from the wards if we force transfers of patients they've already said they can't take. It's not enough to talk the talk. At some point you have to walk the walk.
  7. by   Asystole RN
    I have found that the best and least expensive way to recognize an employee individually is to write them a thank you letter and have it sent to their home.

    I personally use the app Felt and hand write thank you cards on my iPad in my free time and send them on. Even though it is not live ink it is still my handwriting and I can customize the cards with pictures or whatever. Sending these cards makes a HUGE impact because it singles them out to let them know you created something unique for them without embarrassing them in public where social pressures may require them to shrug it off.

    The fact that no one writes letters anymore really allows it to stand out.
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    1) Love the Shackleton reference. He is one of my heroes. Read Lansing's book Endurance when you get the chance.

    2) In my experience, all of the recognition stuff that DOES happen, happens about 75% for the day shift, 25% for nights on an individual basis, more like 99%/ 1% on a corporate level.
  9. by   Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    1) Love the Shackleton reference. He is one of my heroes. Read Lansing's book Endurance when you get the chance.

    2) In my experience, all of the recognition stuff that DOES happen, happens about 75% for the day shift, 25% for nights on an individual basis, more like 99%/ 1% on a corporate level.
    That's very true - night shift never seems to receive the same recognition. A few nurses where I work started a night shift committee. They ensure that they get/plan all of the same activities the day shift gets to enjoy. They even recently pushed for (and actually got) food trucks to come by during the night - so the night shift can have a decent hot meal when our other facilities are closed or have limited menu items. The night shift committee is a great idea - I wish someone would have thought of it when I was on night shift for what seemed like forever. I was definitely not cut out for those hours... and was far too sleepy to ever come up with a great idea like that lol
  10. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from Ashley Hay, BSN, RN
    That's very true - night shift never seems to receive the same recognition. A few nurses where I work started a night shift committee. They ensure that they get/plan all of the same activities the day shift gets to enjoy. They even recently pushed for (and actually got) food trucks to come by during the night - so the night shift can have a decent hot meal when our other facilities are closed or have limited menu items. The night shift committee is a great idea - I wish someone would have thought of it when I was on night shift for what seemed like forever. I was definitely not cut out for those hours... and was far too sleepy to ever come up with a great idea like that lol
    This is the topic of my MSN and DNP research. I publish and present on topics related to shift work and nurse fatigue.
  11. by   Been there,done that
    I prefer not to be referred to as " YOUR nurse" .. unless I am administering care to you within the nurse- patient relationship. Only my patients own me.
    Otherwise.. please refer to me as you would any other professional.
    Last edit by Been there,done that on Nov 28, '16

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