question for all with any charges from past - page 2

Im wondering has it affected your employment status. I know a few people mentioned the had criminal charges on their record and went to board and no problem. Does anyone now work in a hospital or a... Read More

  1. by   apogee
    [QUOTE=Dixiecup]I had a class C felony expunged from my record and I've worked for the department of corrections for 13 years.
    Lighten up you - Your a lucky one you are.

    Edited by traumaRUs - reason: personal attack.
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Sep 14, '04
  2. by   VivaLasViejas
    I think the nursing boards take into consideration what the crime was, how long it was committed, if there have been any further problems, and whether or not the person appears to have learned from his/her experience. I was arrested once many years ago (drunk and disorderly, charge dropped), and then later was convicted of a misdemeanor (for failure to appear in court on a traffic ticket). It was expunged after 7 years by the court; even so, I still mentioned it in my application for RN licensure, but the board never once questioned me about it, and it's never been an issue at any place I've ever been employed.

    That's a far cry from a shoplifting charge that happened only a year or so ago, and such an individual would probably have some major explaining to do as to why they did it, and how they'd guarantee they would never, say, steal something from a patient or an employer.
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from sierralafry
    What if a charge was expunged from your record by the court? Will it still be a problem in the future?
    Interesting question because I was reported vindictively once to my BON. An individual convinced a peer review committe I was dangerous. The BON is obligated to investigate every accusation. They looked into my case, found no merit to the accusation, and expunged this from my BON record.

    Trouble is, the vindictive reporter got HR to list the accusation on my Group One background check and they refused to remove their accusation even after I was cleared by my BON!!!. So...this comes up every job interview when HR runs my background check. In other words I STILL have to deal with this 'expunged' accusation!!! But...expunged is still better than convicted....

    I manage it be being upfront, I know it will come up and I control the spin. I kept the letter from the BON and make it available if asked. So...while its a burr under my saddle, it is manageable. I also filed a rebuttal to the accusation with Group One and this is released with my history to all potential employers.

    Sadly this is how facilities 'control' nurses...this type of badmouthing goes on in many areas and is protected under third party laws. I fight it best I can.

    Good luck to all human nurses who are trying to overcome even the perception of a problem in their past...it does get aggravating fighting this ridiculously high standard sometimes.
  4. by   Peppermint
    [.
    Last edit by Peppermint on Jun 25, '06
  5. by   jannecdote
    Quote from a DOCcriminal recordS RN
    It is very improper for you to ask anybody if anybody has . It is none of your business. In all states the charge will tell you if you will ever be eligable to sit for the board exam. I can tell you this, if you have a felony conviction you can never be an RN/LPN. The best thing for you to do is contact your local state dept. of nursing. In the future please consider what it really is you are asking someone.
    Blah, blah, blah. I like this site for this very reason. In this dog eat dog world, it's great to have a place that provides you with answers to questions when you don't know where to turn and vice versa. I might be an old dog but I still need a new bone every once in a while. :chuckle
  6. by   gn04
    i JUST WANTED TO SAY THAT IT IS POSSIBLE AND HAS BEEN DONE, A PERSON CAN GET A NURSING LICENSE WITH A FELONY IT ALL DEPENDS ON THE CHARGE AND THE STATE THAT YOU ARE IN. IT IS SEVERAL NURSES WHO DID NOT HAVE FELONIES PRIOR TO GETTING A LICENSE AND HAVE COMMITTED FELONIES WHILE THEY HAD THER'RE LICENSE SUCH AS STEALING DRUGS AND WERE ABLE TO KEEP THY'RE LICENSE. I DON'T SEE WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE. I THINK THAT IF YOU HAD A FELONY PRIOR AND HAD MADE CHANGES IN YOUR LIFE ( OBVIOUSLY YOU HAD TO IN ORDER TO ENTER AND COMPLETE NURSING SCHOOL) THEN A PERSON SHOULD BE GIVEN THAT CHANCE WHAT IS AND SHOULD BE QUESTIONABLE IS IF YOU OBTAIN A FELONY WHILE ALREADY HAVING A NURSING LICENSE THEN THAT IS WHERE MORAL SHOULD COME IN AT. i WISH EVERYONE THE BEST OF LUCK IN ACHIEVING THERE GOALS.
  7. by   kim1234
    You go girl.................Now I realize why there is a nursing shortage?!?!?!
  8. by   Ex130Load
    In Arkansas, the state board of nursing tells NLCEX or licensing applicants to "fess up" everything, that it's easier to explain what happened than attempt to justify why a criminal act was omitted during the application process to include any act expunged.
    For those who complain that a decade of stellar performance (or longer) can easily be forgotten when a criminal act surfaces no matter how ancient, it partially goes back to "if you can't do the time, don't do the crime." What was your mind set during the criminal act? Most likely it was far from doing the right thing or thinking about longterm consequences. I stated ten years of work performance only for discussion purposes.
    For some folks, initial honesty goes a long way. Yes, there are inherent risks in fessing up ill deeds on a job, licensing, or NCLEX application. That's human nature, "You hid this from me, of what else are you are capable or what else have you hidden?"
    In another life when I was in a position to hire and fire, I personally assigned a premium value to those who fessed up passed transgressions. I thought it said much about one's character. I realize many are not as open-minded as I was/am. In today's litigous work environment, folks with criminal records, hidden or otherwise, are statistical liabilities.
    For those of you in a position to mentor, tutor, or lead, please tell all your charges of the consequences so that they can make more informed decisions. For those of you who elected to hide criminal acts, were outed by whatever mechanism, and subsequently were punished again after a significant period of stellar performance (ten years?), my heart goes out to you that you've not been given the benefit of the doubt by a more enlightened thinker of the "here and now." I think it's a testamony of character to realize the the error of one's and to change, to start walking the "straight and narrow."
    Just my opinion...
  9. by   rockermom
    Quote from donnar232
    Im wondering has it affected your employment status. I know a few people mentioned the had criminal charges on their record and went to board and no problem. Does anyone now work in a hospital or a place where a background check is done and were they approached and questioned. Im just wondering if there will be stumbles fro future employment. I want to work in a hospital >i am hoping to but if I have a charge thats 12 years old. I dont know. Thank you Donna
    Hey Donna -

    Was checking to see if you had any updated information you could share. I have an old misdemeanor too, and plan to petition the Tx BON soon, but until then, I was interested to hear others' experiences.

    Best Wishes
  10. by   imacatlover
    I was just wondering that if someone has a "founded" child abuse on their record whether that affects if they can get a nursing license or if it would jeopardize where they could get a job? I am taking all my required classes right now for my RN and I really hate to spend the next few years of my life going for my dream only to be turned down when I get all the way through school. I have done a few google searches on the web and came up empty. I am just wondering if there is anyone out there that can help me? Greatly appreciated!
  11. by   chrisandjac
    thank you
    Last edit by chrisandjac on Jun 12, '06
  12. by   LuvMyGamecocks
    I realize that everyone makes mistakes that can produce long-lasting consequences, and many do the best they can to erase/come back from their mistakes. However, what you SHOULD be worried about is the long-lasting consequences of the person being abused, rather than a job. I've sat here and tried to think of a tactful, TOS, nice way to say it, but I simply cannot. You SHOULD be embarrassed for having child abuse charges against you.

    With all due respect, if you were a DON investigator, would you want to give a nursing license to someone who has been proven to abuse children? I would think you'd be too much of a risk.

    Please don't edit. If this is too far out of TOS terms, please just remove my post. Thanks, mods.
  13. by   chrisandjac
    thank you
    Last edit by chrisandjac on Jun 12, '06

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