Previous Bachelors degree going into nursing - do I need a BSN or just an ADN?

  1. 0 I am about to graduate from a university with a Bachelors in Psychology and a Bachelors in Spanish. I would really like to go into nursing. I've already been accepted into a school where I will get my RN/BSN in a short amount of time, but it is kind of expensive. Since I already will have 2 bachelors degrees, would it be better for me to just go through an ADN program that would be cheaper? Eventually, I would like to go through a MSN or DNP program to be a nurse practitioner and I've looked and they all say to have a BSN or your ADN with a previous bachelors, but I'm wondering if it'd look better that I went to a nice school for BSN instead of a community college for ADN. I'm just trying to decide what would be better for my career in the long run. I'm trying to factor in money, but loans are an option. Please help!!!
  2. Visit  k.ronning profile page

    About k.ronning

    Joined Nov '10; Posts: 2.

    17 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Ardneth profile page
    0
    My suggestion would be to go for the BSN if you can. All graduate schools require a BSN to go for a MSN or DNP, not all of them will allow for ADN + non-nursing BSN. It's not really an issue of a "nice" school with a BSN or a community college for an ADN. It's just BSN vs. ADN. If you know for sure what school you want to go to for your MSN/DNP, then you can rely on their requirements and just do what works best for you.
  4. Visit  MassED profile page
    0
    Quote from k.ronning
    I am about to graduate from a university with a Bachelors in Psychology and a Bachelors in Spanish. I would really like to go into nursing. I've already been accepted into a school where I will get my RN/BSN in a short amount of time, but it is kind of expensive. Since I already will have 2 bachelors degrees, would it be better for me to just go through an ADN program that would be cheaper? Eventually, I would like to go through a MSN or DNP program to be a nurse practitioner and I've looked and they all say to have a BSN or your ADN with a previous bachelors, but I'm wondering if it'd look better that I went to a nice school for BSN instead of a community college for ADN. I'm just trying to decide what would be better for my career in the long run. I'm trying to factor in money, but loans are an option. Please help!!!
    do you NEED a BSN vs ADN? Well to start out, obviously you NEED an ADN. As far as having that BSN, I believe it helps out when you're competing for a job and you have a BSN vs. another equally good candidate that has their ADN. I hear that they pay more for a BSN, but I've never experienced that - of course I don't know what the starting point for an ADN is vs the starting salary range for a BSN coming new into a facility, so it could help having that BSN. Of course moving into management they "say" you need that, but my managers appear to be grandfathered into their positions and don't have their BSN's. That is just irritating. How can a manager push for education when they don't have a higher degree than many of their staff?
  5. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    0
    I'd look closely at the hiring practices of the hospitals near where you plan to work after graduation. Many of the hospitals in my area prefer BSN prepared new grads and the graduates from the ADN program are at a disadvantage. I'd also look closely in to the quality and reputation of the programs- not all programs are created equally.
  6. Visit  mono2010 profile page
    0
    I'm in the same position and in my region..most of the hospitals want BSN prepared nurses. In doing my research about programs close to me, the ADNs took 2 years and the accelerated programs took 21months. Even though it costs more in the short term, it will prevent me having to do another 2 years after earning an ADN to get my bachelors.
  7. Visit  Noimanurse profile page
    3
    I have a bachelors in Biology, went back several years later and have obtained my ADN. Works well for me, was much cheaper, and while going to the community college I was able to work full-time. Many accelerated BSN programs do not under any circumstances allow you to work outside of college because so much is packed into their 12-18 month program along with a cost that is probably double that of a community college. From my research a BSN is a waste of time and money for ME since I already have a bachelors (sorry BSN'ers), but there are many MSN programs in my area that have a bridge program of somekind to allow me into their program. If nursing were to be my first and only educational degree, then a BSN might be the way to go, but for me it seems like double charting. It sounds to me you will already "have a leg up" on many nurses in just about any locale with your spanish and psychology. If others trouble you because you have an ADN, tell them in spanish ways to mess with their psyche...it will be fun. I enjoy being able to understand the chemistry and the anatomy of the body well due to my science background.

    Overall, as many of have already stated, you need to research your area and what works for you. There are already to bachelors degree to your credit, why? What had you planned on previously? Use what you have and continue building on it for your future.
  8. Visit  Noimanurse profile page
    0
    On another note, if you have these two bachelors degrees, is there a hospital in your area that would hire you as a translator, social worker, counselor, or etc. of some kind? Many hospitals have tuition assistance, some hospitals combined with schools of nursing will also offer free nursing education to their employees. I could get a free BSN now that I'm an RN due to the facility we are associated with.
  9. Visit  msjellybean profile page
    0
    Quote from Malenurses
    I have a bachelors in Biology, went back several years later and have obtained my ADN. Works well for me, was much cheaper, and while going to the community college I was able to work full-time. Many accelerated BSN programs do not under any circumstances allow you to work outside of college because so much is packed into their 12-18 month program along with a cost that is probably double that of a community college. From my research a BSN is a waste of time and money for ME since I already have a bachelors (sorry BSN'ers), but there are many MSN programs in my area that have a bridge program of somekind to allow me into their program. If nursing were to be my first and only educational degree, then a BSN might be the way to go, but for me it seems like double charting. It sounds to me you will already "have a leg up" on many nurses in just about any locale with your spanish and psychology. If others trouble you because you have an ADN, tell them in spanish ways to mess with their psyche...it will be fun. I enjoy being able to understand the chemistry and the anatomy of the body well due to my science background.

    Overall, as many of have already stated, you need to research your area and what works for you. There are already to bachelors degree to your credit, why? What had you planned on previously? Use what you have and continue building on it for your future.
    You pretty much summed up everything I was going to say. With the exception that my bachelors is in dietetics.
  10. Visit  RNperdiem profile page
    1
    Only you can decide of course, but look at a couple of things.
    1. How much debt are you carrying? If you have student loan debts from your previous degrees, I would not recommend you taking on more.
    My hospital pays for continuing education. Tuition reimbursement can help you go from ADN to BSN if you need.
    2. Compare costs. How much is "kind of expensive"? How about school reputation and quality of education?
    MBARNBSN likes this.
  11. Visit  red2003xlt profile page
    0
    BSN all the way.
  12. Visit  iPink profile page
    0
    [partial quote] "...but I'm wondering if it'd look better that I went to a nice school for BSN instead of a community college for ADN."

    OP, I don't want you to demean ADN programs. I know way too many smart nurses who have their ADNs.

    You don't have to have a BSN to get into MSN programs. There are many career changers who decided to do the Direct-Entry MSN program than an Accelerated BSN. In fact, there are Universities in my area that offer it. These programs are only offered to students with at least a bachelors in a non-nursing field.

    If price is your biggest factor, than go for the ADN and then bridge to an RN-to-MSN later. I personally prefer the ABSN programs, because for me, I'll finish quicker taking that route. It would have been a total waste of time and money to get an ADN (sorry ADNers). Later, I'll specialize as an FNP.

    Another note regarding ABSN programs. Many recruiters will highly suggest you not work during the program, however, there are some students who was able to work full or part time and successfully complete the program. It all depends on if you can handle it.

    Good luck to you.
    Last edit by iPink on Nov 22, '10
  13. Visit  TheLastTime profile page
    0
    I faced this two years ago. The Associates and Bachelors were almost equal in duration (about 15 months). It was also a wash in terms of prerequisites required. I went ahead and got the BSN.

    Right now in my area (Central Florida), BSNs are getting interviews and offers. The only Associates that are getting in that I've seen are ones that already had a previous deal worked out with the hospital.

    There is a difference between a bargain and a value.
    Last edit by TheLastTime on Nov 22, '10
  14. Visit  nurse simmy profile page
    0
    I'll share my experience. I needed to become a nurse as quickly as possible to feed my family. I have a bachelors, but choose the ADN route instead of an accelerated program. I don't have enough sciences and would have had to do at least a year of prereqs to get in the program. It is also more competitive, and I would have had to wait longer to get accepted. But the biggest issue was cost. The community college I'm attending is affordable, the other program wanted me to pay graduate fees for the classes since they classified me as a grad student because of the BS. $350/credit hour or $80/credit hour, I did the math, and decided a facility with a tuition reimbursement plan could help pay for the BSN.

    ~Simmy


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close